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post #1 of 27 Old 05-01-2009, 12:25 AM Thread Starter
 
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sprocket question

so my new to me 929 has 9400 miles on it and i ordered a 15 tooth front sprocket for it. the sprockets on it are fine and the chain is fine but I hear that you relly should replace them in sets. I was just going to just put the 15 tooth front on there and call it a day. its not going to break the bank if I need a whole new set in 6k miles. Nor will it if i do a whole set right now but i don't feel like spending all the cash since i just dropped a bunch on other parts.

will doing just the front be that bad?

i deffinatly want the regear but I'm not sure how much. I know 1 down in front is popular but I'm not sure If I want to add in the rear or keep it stock. maybe if I live with the -1 in front for a while I will have a better idea and know what I want in 6k when I go to get a full set
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post #2 of 27 Old 05-01-2009, 12:59 AM
 
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Re: sprocket question

I just bought a whole new set up chain and sprockets 520 conv. for my '06 1kRR. Check out Super Bike Supply Brad has great prices. You could probably do the whole set up for less than you think.
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post #3 of 27 Old 05-01-2009, 1:16 AM
 
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Re: sprocket question

i have a 02 954 and currently running -1(15) in the front and +1(44) in the rear and it has alot of low end!!!

It is best to change sprockets and chains in sets. Altho if the sprocket is Aluminum it will wear faster than the chain. My rear sprocket was shot and I had a 44 lying around so i put it on.

You can get a good DID chain for 105$ and the two sprockets for about 80$. If you dont think you need a new chain you will be fine with just getting the sprockets.

I do like -1(15) and stock (43) set-up. I think when it is time for a new chain ill go back to that. hope this helps
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post #4 of 27 Old 05-01-2009, 1:53 AM
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Re: sprocket question

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Originally Posted by matt.k View Post
so my new to me 929 has 9400 miles on it and i ordered a 15 tooth front sprocket for it. the sprockets on it are fine and the chain is fine but I hear that you relly should replace them in sets. I was just going to just put the 15 tooth front on there and call it a day. its not going to break the bank if I need a whole new set in 6k miles. Nor will it if i do a whole set right now but i don't feel like spending all the cash since i just dropped a bunch on other parts.

will doing just the front be that bad?
If you want the absolute maximum life out of them then you replace them all but it's not necessary if they're still in decent condition.

"I won't forget that ride for a while. Maybe you're right. Living fast might be worth the final crash. Maybe that's the secret you fliers know." - Flight of the Intruder
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post #5 of 27 Old 05-01-2009, 1:55 AM
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Re: sprocket question

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Altho if the sprocket is Aluminum it will wear faster than the chain. My rear sprocket was shot and I had a 44 lying around so i put it on.
It depends on the quality of the chain and sprockets and their maintenance.
A good aluminium sprocket can out last a crap and poorly maintained chain.

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post #6 of 27 Old 05-01-2009, 2:37 AM Thread Starter
 
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Re: sprocket question

any sudgestions at to where i should look for a wole set. it might not be too late to cancel my front sprocket order but even if it comes i can still mix and match brands i guess as long as they are still 530
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post #7 of 27 Old 05-01-2009, 3:04 AM
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Re: sprocket question

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any sudgestions at to where i should look for a wole set. it might not be too late to cancel my front sprocket order but even if it comes i can still mix and match brands i guess as long as they are still 530
You can mix 520, 525 and 530 if you have to but the chain will probably wear faster.
Try online dealers and Ebay.

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post #8 of 27 Old 05-01-2009, 5:37 AM Thread Starter
 
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Re: sprocket question

I wasn't talking about mixing sizes just different company's or design sprockets like having a steel front and aluminum rear or something.

and on that note if i go ahead and get a rear sprocket as well should I stick with stock size? I am getting a vortex racing 15 tooth front that's for sure but if i get a matching steel rear sprocket from them should I go up at all or try just the -1 front?

also if i do both i will have to replace the chain too so what company or features should I be looking for? how many links? can I do this all myself or should i have a shop do it If I'm taking the rear sprocket off too? I have a good deal of mechanical inclination but i haven't done more than a chain adjustment before on a bike

Last edited by matt.k; 05-01-2009 at 5:49 AM.
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post #9 of 27 Old 05-01-2009, 7:39 AM
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Re: sprocket question

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Originally Posted by matt.k View Post
I wasn't talking about mixing sizes just different company's or design sprockets like having a steel front and aluminum rear or something.

and on that note if i go ahead and get a rear sprocket as well should I stick with stock size? I am getting a vortex racing 15 tooth front that's for sure but if i get a matching steel rear sprocket from them should I go up at all or try just the -1 front?

also if i do both i will have to replace the chain too so what company or features should I be looking for? how many links? can I do this all myself or should i have a shop do it If I'm taking the rear sprocket off too? I have a good deal of mechanical inclination but i haven't done more than a chain adjustment before on a bike
I'm not aware of anybody doing aluminium front sprockets so all aluminium sprockets are run with steel fronts.
My point was merely that all 5xx sprockets are the same pitch, they just vary in width. All will work with a 530 chain.
Only you can decide what gearing you prefer but certainly a -1 front is a good start.
Neither sprocket is difficult to change but the chain requires some tools to cut it to length and to rivet the new chain together.
You can do it without a riveter though.
You need to grind off the heads of the rivets and punch the pins through to break the old chain off and to cut the new chain to length. Then you need to peen the new rivets over to hold the new chain together.

"I won't forget that ride for a while. Maybe you're right. Living fast might be worth the final crash. Maybe that's the secret you fliers know." - Flight of the Intruder
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post #10 of 27 Old 05-01-2009, 8:56 AM
 
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Re: sprocket question

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You can do it without a riveter though.
You need to grind off the heads of the rivets and punch the pins through to break the old chain off and to cut the new chain to length. Then you need to peen the new rivets over to hold the new chain together.
Blade, do you really want to recommend someone doing this method on their own? Having done it several times, it is a very high precision operation to rivet a chain. The link must be properly assembled with grease and the O rings (or X rings) in place. The side link must then be pressed on SQUARELY with the proper tool (not a C clamp) to a precise dimension so as to put the correct squish on the O rings. Then with the riveter, the pins are mushroomed, again to a specific dimension. All these dimentions are outlined in the shop manual. Failure to do this properly can result in a binding chain, premature wear or worse, having the link come apart and your chain flies off taking out your cases and possibly jamming, locking you rear wheel at highway speeds. That can't end well.

Either get the proper tools or have it done professionally at a shop, period.
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post #11 of 27 Old 05-01-2009, 10:04 AM
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Re: sprocket question

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Blade, do you really want to recommend someone doing this method on their own? Having done it several times, it is a very high precision operation to rivet a chain. The link must be properly assembled with grease and the O rings (or X rings) in place. The side link must then be pressed on SQUARELY with the proper tool (not a C clamp) to a precise dimension so as to put the correct squish on the O rings. Then with the riveter, the pins are mushroomed, again to a specific dimension. All these dimentions are outlined in the shop manual. Failure to do this properly can result in a binding chain, premature wear or worse, having the link come apart and your chain flies off taking out your cases and possibly jamming, locking you rear wheel at highway speeds. That can't end well.

Either get the proper tools or have it done professionally at a shop, period.
I have no problem with it and I'm sure many people do it like this already rather than spend the money on the proper tools.
Of course, I'm assuming some degree of common sense.
You don't need any special tools to assemble the riveted link correctly.
As you say, the manual shows you what is required in the finished job.
You can also peen the rivets over with a small bearing in a vice.
I've done many chains and I've never used any kind of special tool to put the side plates on. What tool are you talking about exactly?
They press on very easily.

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post #12 of 27 Old 05-01-2009, 10:26 AM
 
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Re: sprocket question

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I have no problem with it and I'm sure many people do it like this already rather than spend the money on the proper tools.
Of course, I'm assuming some degree of common sense.
You don't need any special tools to assemble the riveted link correctly.
As you say, the manual shows you what is required in the finished job.
You can also peen the rivets over with a small bearing in a vice.
I've done many chains and I've never used any kind of special tool to put the side plates on. What tool are you talking about exactly?
They press on very easily.
Your skills blade are far better than most on this forum so when advise is given, that has to be considered especially when it's safety related.

The press is part of the riveting tool. It's just a special piece that fits over the side plate to push it on square with the screw clamp. Are your side plates not very snug as they pass over the pins? Even master link plates are quite snug going on from my experience.

I think if you used the tool you'd change how you feel. With as many chains that you have done, would it not have warranted the $80 cost of the proper tools? The job is done better and no doubt faster in the end.
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post #13 of 27 Old 05-01-2009, 10:46 AM
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Re: sprocket question

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Originally Posted by denzee View Post
The press is part of the riveting tool. It's just a special piece that fits over the side plate to push it on square with the screw clamp. Are your side plates not very snug as they pass over the pins? Even master link plates are quite snug going on from my experience.

I think if you used the tool you'd change how you feel. With as many chains that you have done, would it not have warranted the $80 cost of the proper tools? The job is done better and no doubt faster in the end.
I can't recall ever having trouble putting the side plates on with either type of link (both riveted and clipped are master links). After they're on you have to squish the o-rings down to the right width which you can't do by hand but vice grip pliers work just fine.

I have the proper tools but I have had to do chains when I didn't have the tools with me and many people regularly still fit chains with no special tools. Personally, I do recommend buying the tools to do the job but that doesn't change the fact that most people refuse to spend the money.
Is it RK or EK that are now doing those riveted links that don't require a riveter? They're using a screw or nut that you simply wind down until it fractures at the correct torque. Never seen one but they may be the solution for those that don't want to buy the right tools.

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Re: sprocket question

maybe I'll just put on the front sprocket for a while and call it good. changinge out the chain dosn't sound all that bad but I imagine it would be time consming if you kept having to mess with it to get the right ammount of links. is there an easy way to know how many links you want with a particular setup?

some sort of calculator or anything? or an easy rule of thumb like +- 1 link per tooth?
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post #15 of 27 Old 05-01-2009, 3:24 PM
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Re: sprocket question

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Originally Posted by matt.k View Post
maybe I'll just put on the front sprocket for a while and call it good. changinge out the chain dosn't sound all that bad but I imagine it would be time consming if you kept having to mess with it to get the right ammount of links. is there an easy way to know how many links you want with a particular setup?

some sort of calculator or anything? or an easy rule of thumb like +- 1 link per tooth?
You decide what gearing you want, then fit the chain and mark it to length.

"I won't forget that ride for a while. Maybe you're right. Living fast might be worth the final crash. Maybe that's the secret you fliers know." - Flight of the Intruder
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