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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everybody, (Hi Dr. Nick!)

I just purchased a 95 900RR and I'm running into some electrical problems. :huh: It appears the regulator/rectifier is not working as the voltage going to the battery at 5k Rs is climbing above 16v. My first resistance (Ohm) test on the stator plug made it appear it was out of spec but I had different readings on a second test. Most likely user error and i'll retest it again. :O I'll do an AC test on it in a little bit also. The current regulator on the bike appears to be from a Suzuki and the bike has 30k miles on it so I'm guessing it is possible the stator is bad.

Anyways, I know I'll have to replace the regulator regardless whether or not the stator is bad. I was looking at an inexpensive regulator from a 2002 954RR and wanted to get it but I need to ensure it will work first. I figure it should. :idunno: The voltage one motorcycle regulator puts out should be the same as another as long as it's a 12v system and the engine sizes are similar right?

I've searched all over and I've found individual posts regarding different regulators 900 owners have used but no definitive cross reference chart. :down: Perhaps we could start compiling the data to create one? :idea:
 

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OK first, Always do your electrical charging tests with a fully charged battery. If the Voltage is over 14.9V with the bike running then the regulator is most likely faulty. Why replace with anything other than the correct part? A Regulator/Rectifier from another type of bike might well work, But connections, specifications etc may well be different, so the cost, if you get it wrong, are almost certainly going to outway any saving you may have made.

Generator Low Power Load Test

You shall need to make a special tool for this: Solder about 30cm of wire to the terminals of a spare 55W headlight bulb. Fit suitable crimp tags on the flying ends of these wires to insert into the connector block on the generator stator. Attach the meter clips onto the soldered joints on the end of the headlight bulb. This “Bulbtool” allows voltages to be measured while pulling a handy 4 or 5 Amp test current through the headlight bulb.

Leave the RR disconnected from the generator. Set the meter to read AC RMS VOLTS. Start up the engine. Connect the Bulbtool across any 2 of 3 phase wires from the generator. Measure the AC RMS VOLTS, at low IDLE speed. The voltage should be between 12V AC RMS and 15V AC RMS. Do NOT blip the throttle or rev up the engine, the bulb can burst with too much voltage applied.

Repeat this measurement for each combination of 2 probes on 3 wires, and write down the readings. The readings should all be similar, say 13.21, 13.00, 13.31. Volts If they are different or have any low values, say 13.21, 10.77, 10.82 Volts, then this indicates that the generator stator has an internal turn to- turn short circuit and the generator stator must be replaced.

The generator connections have to carry very high currents, typically 20Amps or more per phase, and all the time. If replacing terminals or crimps, these MUST be soldered after crimping. All readings closely similar and within range of 12V AC RMS to 15V AC RMS shows generator is good. Low readings or diverse readings shows generator stator is defective. Generator must be replaced.
 
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