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Discussion Starter #1
Hi There,

I have ordered a new cam chain and tensioner lifter from Honda and hoping to replace them this weekend.
For replacing the cam chain:
1. Remove cylinder head cover (valve cover). would i need a new gasket here?
2. Set TDC, ensuring IN & EX cam sprockets are level with casing.
3. Retract and remove cam chain tensioner lifter (CCT).
4. Is there enough space to remove old cam chain from the top? Or do I need to remove anything else? Do I need to loosen cam shafts? Will I be able to sling new chain from the top around lower crank sprocket and then around cam shaft sprockets?
5. Should I check valve clearances?
6. Check TDC, ensuring IN & EX cam sprockets are level with casing.
7. Install and release new CCT.
8. New valve caover gasket??? Or just sealant on half-moons and use old gasket?

Thank you in advance.
 

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Nobody????

Are you cutting the chain or putting in a continuous one?

I just cut the old chain, attach the new one to it and pull it through the engine, then rivet it together.
 

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I'm not sure about the 1000RR but on the 954 i took the clutch cover of, removed guides and tensioner and intake cam sprocket. Whit these removed it was very easy to put the new chain to it's place. If the new chain is oem it's continuous.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for your replies.

Its a continuous chain, so I'll have to remove crank shafts and remove right-hand side crank case cover to pull the starter clutch.

Honda never couriered my new cam chain tensioner lifter from Johannesburg to Cape Town (South Africa), so I need to wait!
 

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Thanks for your replies.

Its a continuous chain, so I'll have to remove crank shafts and remove right-hand side crank case cover to pull the starter clutch.

Honda never couriered my new cam chain tensioner lifter from Johannesburg to Cape Town (South Africa), so I need to wait!

Just because it comes continuous doesn't mean that you can't cut it and rivet it together ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Problem is I don't own a chain breaker/riveting tool set and I'm not planning on purchasing one for 1 job.....
(maybe not the best, but for my drive chain I use a punch and hammer on my masterlink)
 

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Problem is I don't own a chain breaker/riveting tool set and I'm not planning on purchasing one for 1 job.....
(maybe not the best, but for my drive chain I use a punch and hammer on my masterlink)

That's fine, but weigh up the small cost of the tool compared to the amount of additional work involved in putting it in continuous ;-)
Motor Motorcycle Bike Timing CAM Chain Cutter Breaker Rivet Riveter Repair Tool | eBay

If you remove the cam sprocket you will need LokTite to reinstall it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Noted.
Think I'll stick with continuous chain and do the additional work. I'll take is as a learning experience.

Thank you once again.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Are you cutting the chain or putting in a continuous one?

I just cut the old chain, attach the new one to it and pull it through the engine, then rivet it together.
Bladeracer, should you have a spare minute, would you mind setting out the EXACT procedure you follow with an open chain? Seems like I'll have to wait another week for my parts, so I'm concidering your suggestion.
 

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I checked the 1000RR service manual and to change the chain you will need to take the clutch cover and valve cover off. Remove the starter gear, tensioner, all guides and 1 off the sprockets. I would remove the intake cams sprocket. You can take off the cams if you wan't but i wouldn't do it if it's not necessary. While you open the covers i would check the clutch and valve clearences at the same and if it needs adjusting then i would take the cams of.
You will just need take the bolt from the bottom of the sprocket first of then turn it to tdc whit the marks lining and then take the clutch cover and last bolt of the sprocket of.

If you cut it then you just cut the old one allso and tie it to old one and pull from the untied end of the old chain while holding the untied end of the new chain until it is on it's place so that you can rivet it. Just need to take the valve cover, tensioner lifter and top cam chain guide of.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks mika_u. I'm planning on doing exactly that. Seeing that I already have a closed timing chain, I will just take off both cam sprockets.
Will let you know how everything went.
Appreciate the assistance.
 

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I checked the 1000RR service manual and to change the chain you will need to take the clutch cover and valve cover off. Remove the starter gear, tensioner, all guides and 1 off the sprockets. I would remove the intake cams sprocket. You can take off the cams if you wan't but i wouldn't do it if it's not necessary. While you open the covers i would check the clutch and valve clearences at the same and if it needs adjusting then i would take the cams of.
You will just need take the bolt from the bottom of the sprocket first of then turn it to tdc whit the marks lining and then take the clutch cover and last bolt of the sprocket of.

If you cut it then you just cut the old one allso and tie it to old one and pull from the untied end of the old chain while holding the untied end of the new chain until it is on it's place so that you can rivet it. Just need to take the valve cover, tensioner lifter and top cam chain guide of.

You will usually need to pull the chain through by turning the crank, which will also require you t turn both cams also to avoid the pistons coming up and hitting them. Use a screwdriver down a plug hole to see if the outer or inner pistons are nearing the top, then turn the cams to close any valves on those two cylinders before continuing to turn the crank until the other pair are nearing the top, turn the cams to close those valves - and so on until you pull the camchain through. Keep tension on the chain all the time as sometimes it can bunch up inside the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So I finally completed the job. I decided to remove both cam shafts, took me 3 tries to get timing correct. Worst part was actually stripping the bike!
After re-assembling, she fired up the first go. Even though it is slightly softer, I still hear the engine noise coming from the right-hand side. I have done plenty of research on this topic and it looks like the 1000 blades tend to have a noisy motor or it is timing chain and tensioner. Seeing that I have replaced the timing chain and tensioner, and still hear the noise..... does this mean it is my noisy engine? Or can something else be wrong?
Forgive my ignorance, I've only owned the bike for 2 weeks and haven't even ridden her, so unfortunately I have no idea what it should sound like.
 

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New bikes have very thin casings. I wouldn't think the 1000RR is any noisier then other sport bikes. You can still hear the valves and chain through the casing even if isn't worn and the tensioner lifter working properly. I owned a 04 1000RR few years and it was 1 year old and under 15000 km:s driven when i bought it. And still you could hear various different sounds from the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'm meeting a mate of mine with a identical blade to hear his motor to compare.

Thanks, you guys are legend
 
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