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Discussion Starter #1
I have a one week old (100 miles on it), CBR1000RR 2009. It just started giving 4 long blinks followed by 3 short ones when the ignition key is turned on. When running, the light is solid. I haven't had a chance to call the dealer yet, and so was wondering (and I will buy a manual for this thing eventually), if anyone can offer some help with interpreting this code. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

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Ok, so the dealer reports that this code doesn't exist. I am going to re-assess the code(s) and report back here when I know more.
 

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It would seem it is giving a 33 and a 34 now that we semi-verified it over the phone. Those are codes that I have seen reference to in these and many other forums. They will look at it for me in a few days.
 

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And BTW, I think I can explain posters submitting codes that don't exist (as I did, and have read others doing). The first long blink is not part of the code. There is a pause and one long blink that precedes a code and presumably comes between mulitple codes that are given. I gleaned this from the mechanic at the Honda shop where I purchased the bike.
 

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bike is still at the dealer. I will update you when I get it back. It was running super rough, holding back, felt like it had about half of its horsepower, it was a mess. Brand new with about 80 miles on it when this happened. I was profoundly disappointed and let the dealer know this. I should know something in the next day or two. I owned a VFR for 11 years and never had a single problem with it. I have high expectations for this CBR1000RR needless to day. It wasn't shutting off, just persistently giving the same MIL codes and running like crap. My biggest concern was with continuing to ride it that way, like when I had to ride it back to the dealer 30 miles away. They assured me (and I hope they were right) that it should be OK.
 

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Well this situation has now descended into the horrible. the dealer acknowledges that there are multiple problems not the least of which is the one with the servo controlled exhaust valve. It is not working and they can't fix it, nor can they duplicate the issue on demand so they can video it to have the Honda techs in California see it. The top CBR1000RR guy in the country has been working on this and can't fix it (1 week later). The dealer, incredibly, has asked me to take the bike back and ride it, despite the fact that it will sometimes not start, the engine may cut out, it runs like **** when the valve malfunctions, it is spewing gasoline somewhere in the system as you can smell it everywhere when this issue occurs, etc, etc .. unprofessional and dangerous and, I believe not in keeping with the standards that Honda claims they uphold in all their dealings. I can't believe this. Bike is defective and the dealer can't fix it and they want me to accept it that way and ride it. I wouldn't have believed it unless I heard it from the the mouths of Honda folk. I am now looking for anyway I can to accomplish getting the bike replaced with another from the dealer as I don't feel I should have to endure this from a bike that went to hell with 60 miles on it. Lemon laws, county attorneys office, better business bureau, etc .. here I come. I will be hitting up the owners of the dealer and the GM next.
 

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Well I thought I would update everyone on this bizarre and elusive issue with my new CBR1000RR. Let me preface all this with that, I have never had so much trouble with a new bike ever, and so I was very upset when Honda Motor Corp. didn't step up immediately, and even seemed apathetic. I now know that they were working diligently with the shop in the background and only neglecting me and passing on bad (very bad) information to me too infrequently. To make a very very very long story short, they (Honda), finally relented and let the shop entertain swapping the ECM in the bike with one from a new bike on the dealer floor. When that one wouldn't fail (mine would only fail every now and then and with no patterns we could discern), they got the even better idea to put the 'unhealthy' one in the new bike. This caused failures that were seen by all and documented. They (Honda) immediately swooped in and stole it away to study it somewhere, as they maintained all along that a solid-state ECM could not fail and it would be fruitless to replace it and the wiring harness. They overnighted a new one from CA installed it in my bike, and then began all the thorough engine testing that I insisted on, as my bike had been running horribly rough for so long with no fix in site. Engine was OK (still hoping that is really is), plugs were replaced, oil checked for gas etc, leak down tests performed, etc, etc. I finally have my bike back and it is running OK, FINALLY. It spent three weeks of its first month with me out of commission. I ended up with a Two Bros M2 installed on the bike as part of troubleshooting the issue. They didn't want to remove the exhaust valve actuator and insisted that if the stock exhaust were removed it would eliminate the issue, as the problem of the cable wrapping the wrong way and not opening the valve would be a non-issue. Boy was everyone wrong about that. Disappointing because this advice came from the best and the brightest at Honda (top model guy in the country was very involved daily on this issue). They should have known that it was the position of the actuator (and it communication with the ECM) that was causing the issue (bizarre) and not the physical presence of the stock exhaust and it failing valve that was the culprit. In my opinion this is recall material as it renders the bike unrideable. We'll see what comes of this. I have asked for an update, but think I won't receive one. They still don't know how the ECM is failing, just that replacing it seems (so far) to have fixed the problem. Again, my issues are with Honda's reluctance to step up in a big way IMMEDIATELY, and their advice of stop gaps and workarounds and cheap fixes (I heard more than once from people that they were trying to 'limit their losses'). The f'ing audacity of telling a customer that. I am still stunned by that remark from the owner of the dealerships and service people. In the end, a 700 dollar ECM fixed the issue. It would seem people are still having trouble seeing the big picture because the costs of this issue for all involved were/are far higher than that was (lost work time, stress, demo bike I rode for days (they finally did this for me), deal on the M2, all labor costs, new battery, actuator, the time of about a million people that worked on this for weeks, etc, etc, etc. The big picture people. Now everyone at the shop hates me I am sure (too bad as that is my shop I will/must use for ongoing service), and I have a new and very unpleasant experience with Honda (my longtime motorcycle favorite) to ponder and spread the word about. I am just getting started btw.
 
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