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Where to begin..... I'm not going to go through steps or anything like that because thats what a manual is for. I just figured I'd do a small write-up for some tips I found along the way by mistakes or figuring things out after the fact.

Initially I was going to replace the CCT with another automatic, as well as do valve checks and install pair block-off plates. That soon turned into a world of fun.

Block-off plates are simple, mine are Driven and can be had for 30 bucks or so. Helps with getting rid of clutter, looks better (which you will never see), and most importantly it gets the bike ready for the dyno. (1st Pic)

Valve checks are somewhat more challanging, but are not all that difficult. The valve cover can be somewhat tricky to get out. Trick for that is picking it up slightly, and sliding it directly back and over the throttlebodies (if you left them in) After that it is pretty straight forward via the manual.
DO NOT OVER-TIGHTEN THE VALVE COVER BOLTS!!! (I broke one, hence the engine drop.. :()

Now to the engine drop... Read the manual. This is just generalizing and helping with main points. You will need a buddy to help get the bike up on the saw horses and engine removal/install. Will probably also need a breaker bar for swingarm pivot nut and front sprocket.

Swingarm needs to come out first. Found steel at Lowes shaped in a V (for welding?). It is PERFECT for getting the rear of the bike up if you have 2 sawhorses. Take the rearsets off and use that space between the bolts and lift the bike up with a friend with that V at the top bolt hole. The bottom of the rear fairings will have to be unbolted and moved up a bit so it doesnt touch but it works very well for 6 dollars worth of steel.
Front sprocket is difficult to get off. Once up though you can put a rod (or garden hoe in my case) through the swingarm and rear tire, then give it hell.
The swingarm pivot nut requires a 24mm (or 5/8) hex head. I did not have one so I went to Lowes and got a 5/8 hex bolt with some 5/8 nuts to screw on the end. Put the nuts on the bolt and find a welder or have someone do it for you like I did. They should do it for free as it takes 5mins tops. You now have a hex head to take the pivot nut off for about a dollar to $1.50.. :thumb: (Pic 2, 3, 4)

I took the throttle cables out of the throttlebodies, it was a bit of a pain to get them out and back in but is doable. I didn't take off the throttlebodies for the drop then. If you do take them off then you might as well put them in a bag with the cables attached and hang off the bars or something.

Now I didn't remove the kickstand, rearsets, or throttlebodies. You can save a bit of time and leave those attached.
(Pic 5)

Pop a jack under when disconnected, label things that are not obvious and thar she goes!

Getting back together is fairly straightforward and actually went quicker for me than getting it apart. First bolts I put in were the ones that attach to the frame right below the frame slider bolts, then the pivot bolt. Use grease where needed and might as well clean before you put stuff back together. (Pic 6) :smilebig:

Common problem it seems... Make sure to get air out of the cooling system. Let run with cap open and fill when needed. You will feel the radiator get hot when it is starting to circulate. Blip the throttle a few times after it is good and hot to help get some of the air out. Keep filling when needed. It will make a mess and take a little while...

Take your time and have fun!!! I learned a ton and am happy to be back on the road. :thumb:


PS: I am no expert. I just did this and figured I would share things I had to figure out to make it easier for others in my position as some of these things are not yet on the web...
 

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Thanks for these tips, im currently in the process of pulling the motor on mine... next thing for me to do is separate the swingarm from the motor... the 5/8 bolt head looks like a pretty smart idea, saves some $ too... thanks again... any tips on re-assembly?
 

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I found it easier to reassemble. Just nice and slow to get it up with a jack and get the bolts in place (lower 2 first then top) Make sure the wires are up and out of the way so that nothing gets pinched.

Depending on how you did the throttlebodies, it could be a bit time consuming... If you took the wires out like me it was a pain in the ass but is still doable and don't have to mess with taking them off/on.

Just make sure every plug finds its mate, they are all slightly different so you can't cross anything.

Just follow the manual (+/- some of the things I listed) and you should be fine. Double check all of the connections and make sure you get everything back together correctly and torqued down.

Of course if you have questions me and/or others on here are happy to help! :thumb:
 

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If i do it again im leaving the swing arm with rear wheel attached to the engine until the engine is clear of the frame. Just sayin.
Great write up Camper!
SA954RRWA542,
That's how I did it when I had to put in a timesert. I basically just propped up the bike on jackstands and removed the frame and subframe from the engine

Here is what I had to remove:

-Fairings (just the bottom and the sides)
-Tank and Airbox
-Remove the airbox Flapper cable and set it aside.
-Throttle Cables
-Radiator bolts (Top 2 bolts with rubber bushings that are connected to the frame)
- All wiring connectors that come off of the main harness from the battery tray, to the coil pack sub harness connector and everything in between. All connectors are somewhat unique and color coded besides the 2 black 2-pin connectors (label these because I got them mixed up on reassembly)
-Clutch cable from the engine side.
-Rear brake slave cylinder
-Exhaust Can (or at least the mount)
-Exhaust valve cables and Servo.
-Disconnect rear shock from frame




 

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If you don't mind, I can add a tip. I have just removed the motor and I am separating the crankcase.

Anyway, when removing the throttle body from the motor, it will be a pian to remove them. So, use a hair dryer on the rubber parts to help you ease the throttle body off. DO NOT PULL BY THE FUEL RAIL, as stated in the manual. Find a hard point on the throttle body and gently pry.

Also, I removed the motor in my shed, because I was able to use the rafters as a hoist point for the rear and to remove the swing arm. Plus I was able to hoist the bike high enough to remove the motor easily.

Hope this helps.
 
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