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Discussion Starter #1
could aftermarket aluminum clutch plates (with OEM fiber plates) cause a hard and knotchy shift, most pronounced in 1st to 2nd. Refuses to go into neutral from 1st or 2nd. I'm fairly certain the new plates are the culprit, but wanted to ask around before I dive in. I just replaced the oem steels and this is what I'm experiencing. Shifting was normal before the install. My only thought is I screwed something up in the process, but I've replaced clutches before without mishap. :hmm:
 

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kc954 said:
could aftermarket aluminum clutch plates (with OEM fiber plates) cause a hard and knotchy shift, most pronounced in 1st to 2nd. Refuses to go into neutral from 1st or 2nd. I'm fairly certain the new plates are the culprit, but wanted to ask around before I dive in. I just replaced the oem steels and this is what I'm experiencing. Shifting was normal before the install. My only thought is I screwed something up in the process, but I've replaced clutches before without mishap. :hmm:
If you had no problem before the clutch plates replacement then by the method of elimination either the new plates are at fault, or you screwed up somewhere along the line during installation. As fitting new clutch plates is pretty simple I would suspect the new plates. I guess an easy way to find out is to put the original OEM steels back in......a pain I know, but the easiest way to find out.
If the clutch was performing fine before, why did you replace the steels anyway?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
turns out that my friend, who originally bought these plates for his 954 (bike was stolen before he installed them), left out an important detail that they have to be "broken in" with a few high rev launches, and my initial experience is normal. Thats what he said, I already took them out and put the old steels back in. I replaced them because 1) they were free, and 2) less rotating mass in the clutch assembly = faster-reving motor.
 
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