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Discussion Starter #1
My second 929 is getting the bloody code 35 fault light just like my first.
The thing I've gathered from what I've read it's usually the servo stripped its teeth or maybe the exhaust valve stuck.
(My first 929 was exactly that , servo stripped teeth.)

If I manually turn the servo with the key off I can easily turn it to both ends and when I turn the key on it centralises with no problems. I can't turn it with the key on as you would expect so how else does the exhaust gas recirc system play up?

Are there sensors on the air box flap? I'm just wondering what the system monitors so that it thinks it's got a fault?I can't see the air flap without removing stuff obviously but the cable off the servo to it is moving ok. Maybe if it was snapped at the airbox that could be a problem but how does the ECU know its not moving?
 

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The ECU only knows about the valve/flapper through the servo. There's no sensors or anything like that. It is possible to throw up the code by having the servo in the wrong position when you turn the key on.

It's worth opening up the airbox and removing the plastic flapper and mounts for it, and just leave the cable in place.

There's a thread for how to remove the servo and not have the code come up - it involves a bit of soldering and maybe 1-2 dollars in parts.

edit: http://www.fireblades.org/forums/how-articles/102769-how-delete-htev-servo-no-fi-light.html
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah I've seen the replacing with parts topic, but I like to keep things stock if possible.
If the servo was broken and going to cost £100's to replace then fair enough, but from what I can see the servo is functioning correctly, well as far as moving anyway.
I wonder if the servo has "home position" sensors then?

If like you say the valve and flapper have no detection then that leaves the servo only to report back its position I'm guessing.
 

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Yeah I've seen the replacing with parts topic, but I like to keep things stock if possible.
If the servo was broken and going to cost £100's to replace then fair enough, but from what I can see the servo is functioning correctly, well as far as moving anyway.
I wonder if the servo has "home position" sensors then?

If like you say the valve and flapper have no detection then that leaves the servo only to report back its position I'm guessing.

The servo has to be set up as per the manual I think for the MIL to go away.
I would strongly recommend removing the airbox flapper entirely if you intend to retain the servo motor as it overloads the already way overloaded servo gears.
The usual cause of the gears stripping is the HTEV becoming coked up so replacing the servo without cleaning the HTEV bushes is a waste of time and money.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I was working on my front brake pads this morning. Whilst I was already on the floor I decided to take a look at the servo and basically did the above. Turned it fully one way then turned the key on, then the other way etc.
The code 35 has been flashing for nearly a month and I pretty much just ignored it as I've gathered from here the whole system isn't that important anyway.

I rode to work today and it stayed off! I can only assume something was stuck , and me working it back and forth cleared the Jam.

You think I should still bin the cables connecting to the air flap and HTEV then? Thus allowing the servo unloaded movement. ? I actually have an 'as new' HTEV that I bought off ebay with a throw away bid might be worth a quick swap out to keep the servo from straining?
 

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I was working on my front brake pads this morning. Whilst I was already on the floor I decided to take a look at the servo and basically did the above. Turned it fully one way then turned the key on, then the other way etc.
The code 35 has been flashing for nearly a month and I pretty much just ignored it as I've gathered from here the whole system isn't that important anyway.

I rode to work today and it stayed off! I can only assume something was stuck , and me working it back and forth cleared the Jam.

You think I should still bin the cables connecting to the air flap and HTEV then? Thus allowing the servo unloaded movement. ? I actually have an 'as new' HTEV that I bought off ebay with a throw away bid might be worth a quick swap out to keep the servo from straining?

I suggest removing the flapper and cable, yes.
If the servo motor is working fine then it's up to you whether to retain it until it fails, or remove it now. If you remove the cables to the HTEV then there is no reason to retain the servo motor at all.
 

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If you remove the cables to the HTEV then there is no reason to retain the servo motor at all.
Unless you don't want a MIL light the whole time, in which case leave it plugged in.
 

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Unless you don't want a MIL light the whole time, in which case leave it plugged in.

Okay, I'll rephrase it to "no useful purpose in retaining the servo motor" :)
 

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I actually didn't know about the HTEV until I binned my 954 and got it jammed up with pea gravel which ended up stripping the gears on the servo. It took a bit of research to figure out why the bike was running so terrible, I really thought the crash had damage a lot more than what was visible. The HTEV is a pretty clever bit of engineering. Had they used better parts, it would be bullet proof.
When I took the servo apart I was really ticked that they don't sell replacement gears for it since it seems like something that would fail under normal use anyway, :mad: and once the gears strip the device is useless even with the cables disconnected. You can get the MIL to clear at idle, but once the servo hits a spot that the gears are stripped, it will throw the MIL again.
The bit that ultimately led to the removal of my system was the cost to fix the pointless POS, which led me to getting very familiar with the workings of said POS, which then led me to spending more money on a fuel management system and becoming pretty familiar with it's workings. (the install was not quite as easy as described by the manual) The best way to learn about these things is to pick up a manual and learn to do it yourself imo.
In the end, I don't regret it a bit! :thumb:
 

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In the other case, same as 35 cods. But whatever I change a new one,it still through 35 code. I read and read service manual at 188/488 page..

manual suggest to replace new ECU..don't know what's going on with it...
 
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