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Anyone know how to bleed breaks?

hey org members,

need help bleeding breaks and changing fluids, can anyone quickly give me a quick tutorial, and also spark change? should I do if from tank side or radiotor side?


thanks

Mark
 

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Re: Anyone know how to bleed breaks?

Spark Plugs, I always went through the top. After the first time, its fairly easy. Use the plug wrench that came with the bike to remove them. When you get to pulling the coils off, they can be stubborn. I found it best to unplug them all, the gently use a screwdriver to break the seal by prying up on them.

Now as far as bleeding goes... If you have use of a mity-vac or bleeder of some sort, they are great!..... to start with and get the majority of the fluid flushed. If not you can do it by hand, it will just take a little more time and elbow grease. To do it by hand it is easiest to have a friend help you. Take the top off the resevoir and remove the little floaty-piece (technical term). You need to keep the reservoir about half full all the time, but dont let it get too low and suck in air. Take an 8mm box-end wrench and some tubing and put it on the caliper nipple. (wrench then tubing). Now, while a buddy/wife/somebody pumps the brakes, you crack the bolt and let it flow into a jar/bottle. Keep pumping and filling the reservoir until you see clean fluid comming out the other end. Tighten that side, then go to the other. Do the same thing to the other side and rear. If you get any air in the system or your brakes are mushy, I have found that if you put it all back together, then lean the bike over to the left as far as you can, making the mc the highest point of the system, then pump the brakes and maybe tap on the bango bolt, you will be able to free any trapped air.
Hope this helps,
Chris
 

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Re: Anyone know how to bleed breaks?

abtech says: "ALWAYS USE A MITY-VAC!"

(He hates those things) :rotfl:

We used to have a KB on bleeding the brakes but I lost it. Need to do one on the plugs too...
 

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Re: Anyone know how to bleed breaks?

MarkN929RR said:
hey org members,

need help bleeding breaks and changing fluids, can anyone quickly give me a quick tutorial, and also spark change? should I do if from tank side or radiotor side?


thanks

Mark
I just installed new stainless lines and R1 Calipers on my brother's '93 FZR1000 this weekend, so I'll give you a brief summary.

I removed his existing calipers and lines, routed the new lines (carefully--stainless lines can wear through wiring pronto, even with the plastic sleeve), then installed them on the new calipers and the master cylinder. after everthing was nice and snug, I removed the brake reservoir cap and filled the reservoir. Then I slowly pumped the lever a few times, held the lever down, unscrewed the banjo on the right caliper, screwed it down again, and released the lever. I followed this procedure for both calipers until I had brake fluid and air squishing out. Next, I used the bleed screw on the brake calipers (versus the banjo bolt) and pumped the lever slowly/methodically a few times, before holding the lever down, unscrewing the bleed screw and screwing it in again. Basically the same procedure as for the banjo bolt. After I had a nice stream of fluid coming out (and not air bubbles) out of both calipers, I moved up to the "doulbe banjo" on the master cylinder, and followed the same bleeding procedure--but tapping the master a few times (gently) with the wrench to get the air bubbles out. Then I did the same with the bleed screw on the master cylinder. By this time, I had a very firm lever and an air-free system.

Things to note:

Keep an eye on the fluid level in the Reservoir--keep filling it, as the level will go down quickly once you are actively pumping.

You should have a couple of feet of rubber tubing to place over the bleed nipples and into a catch bottle of some sort (so you don't have a messy brake fluid spill) as you're bleeding, and you should have plenty of clean rags to clean up any brake fluid, as it can damage your bike's paint (and to cover the instrument cluster when you're bleeding the master).

You can also buy a pump system bleeder, but I find it unnecessary as bike brake systems bleed rather quickly, and so long as you are patient you are rewarded with a great feel at the lever.

Maybe overly simplistic, but this is how I do it and it has worked fine... :thumb:
 

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Good info. Just want to stress that after having tubing in place, you open the bleeder bolt, squeeze the lever, close the bleeder bolt, release the lever. Repeat until bled.

Installing Speed Bleeders will make the job go quicker and make it a one-person job, because you won't have to close the bleeder bolt before releasing the lever. The speed bleeder has a check valve in it that does that for you. So, you just keep pumping the lever.

Cover everything up really well. Brake fluid will ruin paint and plastics in short order.

Another thing to do to get more air out is, after you're done for the day and all bleeder bolts are closed up, etc., take a bungee cord and compress the brake lever, holding it squeezed in overnight with the bungee cord. Then the next day repeat the bleeding sequence.
 

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One little trick that i was told about a year ago, Is when you think you have just about all the air out. But you still just a little mush when you first start to squeze the lever.

Take a piece of velcro, Squeze the lever pretty hard, Wrap the velcro around the lever. So that the velcro keeps presure on the lever. And let it sit over night. Wile it sits over night the last little bit of air get adsorbed in to the fluid. In the morning grab the lever , Take the velcro off,( or what ever you used to tye the lever back) And relesase the lever slowly.


I know it sounds like a load of B/S. And i thought the same thing till i tryed it. And sure enought that little last bit was/is gone. I frist tryed that my self when i put SS brake lines one my 12. Getting that last bit of air out of the banjo bolt was driveing me nuts. So i thought i would give it a try and sleep on it. Need less to say i was a verry happy camper the next day.
 

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Venom said:
One little trick that i was told about a year ago, Is when you think you have just about all the air out. But you still just a little mush when you first start to squeze the lever.

Take a piece of velcro, Squeze the lever pretty hard, Wrap the velcro around the lever. So that the velcro keeps presure on the lever. And let it sit over night. Wile it sits over night the last little bit of air get adsorbed in to the fluid. In the morning grab the lever , Take the velcro off,( or what ever you used to tye the lever back) And relesase the lever slowly.


I know it sounds like a load of B/S. And i thought the same thing till i tryed it. And sure enought that little last bit was/is gone. I frist tryed that my self when i put SS brake lines one my 12. Getting that last bit of air out of the banjo bolt was driveing me nuts. So i thought i would give it a try and sleep on it. Need less to say i was a verry happy camper the next day.
Yep I do the same thing. Works a treat :thumb:
 

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My 2cts.

Don't waste time and money on Speed Bleeders, bleeder banjo bolts, Mity-Vac, handlebar overnight squeezing, dead chicken waving etc.

After you try it every other way, and it still does not get all the air out...

You can resort to the following:

First, get some lever pressure using normal bleeder screw and pump technique.
Remove reservour cap.
Remove one caliper.
Push the pistons back into the caliper, forcing the air back up through the reservour.
Replace that caliper and repeat with the other.

Good results every time. :smilebig:
 

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Zippy said:
My 2cts.

Don't waste time and money on Speed Bleeders, bleeder banjo bolts, Mity-Vac, handlebar overnight squeezing, dead chicken waving etc.

After you try it every other way, and it still does not get all the air out...

You can resort to the following:

First, get some lever pressure using normal bleeder screw and pump technique.
Remove reservour cap.
Remove one caliper.
Push the pistons back into the caliper, forcing the air back up through the reservour.
Replace that caliper and repeat with the other.

Good results every time. :smilebig:
That will definitely work. But you'll be pushing crappy, partical encrusted, burnt fluid back through the master cylinder.
 

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Venom said:
One little trick that i was told about a year ago, Is when you think you have just about all the air out. But you still just a little mush when you first start to squeze the lever.

Take a piece of velcro, Squeze the lever pretty hard, Wrap the velcro around the lever. So that the velcro keeps presure on the lever. And let it sit over night. Wile it sits over night the last little bit of air get adsorbed in to the fluid. In the morning grab the lever , Take the velcro off,( or what ever you used to tye the lever back) And relesase the lever slowly.


I know it sounds like a load of B/S. And i thought the same thing till i tryed it. And sure enought that little last bit was/is gone. I frist tryed that my self when i put SS brake lines one my 12. Getting that last bit of air out of the banjo bolt was driveing me nuts. So i thought i would give it a try and sleep on it. Need less to say i was a verry happy camper the next day.
This is really just a bandaid, as the air and fluid will seperate in a short period of time leaving the brakes just like they were before.

Here is the way we do it and it works period.

First, if you have a MityVac, find the box it came in, place it back inside along with the instructions and return it to the place you purchased it. With less than half of that money in your pocket, order a bleeder banjo bolt for the master cyclinder and install it before you begin.

Put the bike on a race stand, so it's relatively level (side to side).

I suggest buying a set of Speedbleeders to make this simple job even easier. If you don't have the Speedbleeders, then just get an 8 mm open end wrench, about 2 to 2.5 feet of clear plastic hose and an empty coffee can.

Pull off the rubber caps on the bleeders (doing one side at a time) and place the clear hose over the nipple and the other end into the can.

Remove the top of the reservoir and top it off with fresh Motul 600 DOT 4 racing fluid.

Pump the lever a few times until you get some serious resistance and then while applying pressure on the lever, open the nipple with the 8 mm wrench about 1/4 turn and as the lever begins to move, tighten it back up.

Repeat this last step until you no longer see any air bubbles in the clear tubing. Note you will have to keep an eye on the reservoir level to make certain you ALWAYS have plenty of fluid.

Once you no longer see any bubbles, move to the other caliper and repeat.

Let the brakes sit for about 5 minutes and then repeat the bleeding operation.

Now take the handle of a large screwdriver and start tapping on the brake line (again one side at a time) beginning at the caliper and slowly moving upward toward the master cylinder. If you have the stock lines, then make certain you carefully tap both sides of the junction and then follow it up to the master cylinder.

Again let the brakes sit for about 5 minutes and then move your clear plastic tubing to the bleeder bolt at the master cylinder and using the same technique, bleed this nipple until there are no air bubbles in the tubing.

This last step is the most important, as the air bubbles always travel up to the top of the lines (as well as get stuck in the T junction on stock systems). I have heard so many people tell me they have bled the brakes 10 or more times and the brakes are still squishy and then they go out and buy a MityVac and go through a couple of quarts of brake fluid and still have crap for brakes. Everyone that says they have "totally" bled the brakes (but didn't do the master cylinder) has always had a ton of air in the top of the lines and are amazed when they see even more bubbles come out of their supposedly "airless" system.
 

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abtech said:
...First, if you have a MityVac, find the box it came in, place it back inside along with the instructions and return it to the place you purchased it. ...
but, but, but the Mity Vac is a TOOL and it looks neat! :)

I will try your instructions when I replace my RC51 lines. Bought the SS lines to do it last summer....except for the speedbleeders...$
 

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I changed my brakelines today after work, and bled them per Abtechs instructions :) Works like a charm :thumb:

I don't have speedbleeders, but it's still a one man jobb if you ask me. The bleeder nipple on the master cyl. helped a lot!!

SO looking forward to spring so I can test the bike with the PCIII and the new brakelines :D
 

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Fire929blade said:
I changed my brakelines today after work, and bled them per Abtechs instructions :) Works like a charm :thumb:

I don't have speedbleeders, but it's still a one man jobb if you ask me. The bleeder nipple on the master cyl. helped a lot!!

SO looking forward to spring so I can test the bike with the PCIII and the new brakelines :D
Where did you get the bleeder nipple for the master cylinder?
 

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Zippy said:
Don't waste time and money on Speed Bleeders, bleeder banjo bolts, Mity-Vac, handlebar overnight squeezing, dead chicken waving etc.

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:
 
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