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Discussion Starter #1
What is the most common skill that you see inexperienced riders either not using or using incorrectly? Street or track does not matter, lets compile a list.
 

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Trying to do too much in a corner. Simplifying what you have to do entering a corner is a quickest way around it. For example, you can do braking and downshifting much earlier and be on the throttle already when you hit the apex. Then you can move the braking and downshifting points further into a corner as you feel more confident. I've seen (I also did) riders going through corners in false neutral (clutch pulled in all the way) because they didn't get a chance to be in the right gear and be on the throttle out of corners.

Another thing too is that many riders think they have to pull the clutch all the way in when shifting, when infact you can set it up to only pull about 1" and snap to shift instead of gradual release of clutch which can be somewhat inefficient.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Trying to do too much in a corner. Simplifying what you have to do entering a corner is a quickest way around it. For example, you can do braking and downshifting much earlier and be on the throttle already when you hit the apex. Then you can move the braking and downshifting points further into a corner as you feel more confident. I've seen (I also did) riders going through corners in false neutral (clutch pulled in all the way) because they didn't get a chance to be in the right gear and be on the throttle out of corners.

Another thing too is that many riders think they have to pull the clutch all the way in when shifting, when infact you can set it up to only pull about 1" and snap to shift instead of gradual release of clutch which can be somewhat inefficient.
:clap:
 

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New rider forgot to turn off blinkers, Look over their shoulder for impending danger, They try to keep up with more skilled riders, or ride above their skills level. Also new rider do not scan ahead enough, someone once told me that when your riding a motorcycle, when you get surprised, slow down.
 

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most new riders in here get these bikes and have no idea what it takes to control one they just like how they look on sport bikes add to that that almost everybody is racing the streets no turn signals so they are the most likely to cause accidents
 

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For street riding, not taking into consideration that no-one sees them and everyone is trying to kill them.
 

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fixate on something instead of looking where they want the bike to go, my friend just got a new r6 and was going around a corner but looked straight ahead and went off the road trying to keep up with another rider.....another guy was doing a wheelie and should've let go of the bike but held onto it and scrape his knees down to the bone (IDIOTS!!!)
 

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fixate on something instead of looking where they want the bike to go, my friend just got a new r6 and was going around a corner but looked straight ahead and went off the road trying to keep up with another rider.....another guy was doing a wheelie and should've let go of the bike but held onto it and scrape his knees down to the bone (IDIOTS!!!)
Yep. This is something that I still struggle too (does that make me an idiot? :smilebig:) Not so much on the track, but on the canyons. I know I can stay much calmer and stable if I look ahead, I sometime struggle to take my eyes off dark patches and marks on the ground. In the corner of my head, 'that's oil, you'll slip!' continues to ring, until I pass it, and nothing happens. There seems to be always something new to watch out on the streets even if I have been there a hundreds of times. However, even in the case of going over the patch of oil, looking through the turn will get through it safer than trying to do something about it in the mid-corner. I've had two wheels slide on a streak of oil for about 10-15" without crashing because I kept off the brakes and throttle hand steady. Not so easy as it sounds though...
 

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Yep. This is something that I still struggle too (does that make me an idiot? :smilebig:) Not so much on the track, but on the canyons. I know I can stay much calmer and stable if I look ahead, I sometime struggle to take my eyes off dark patches and marks on the ground. In the corner of my head, 'that's oil, you'll slip!' continues to ring, until I pass it, and nothing happens. There seems to be always something new to watch out on the streets even if I have been there a hundreds of times. However, even in the case of going over the patch of oil, looking through the turn will get through it safer than trying to do something about it in the mid-corner. I've had two wheels slide on a streak of oil for about 10-15" without crashing because I kept off the brakes and throttle hand steady. Not so easy as it sounds though...

Not you, the wheelie kings are idiots
 

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Trying to control the direction of the bike solely by leaning the bike with their body weight instead of leaning the bike over by counter steering: it's not natural to turn right to go left and visa versa. It's hard to teach people to do this and once they learn, they sometimes will revert back to trying to guide the bike with their body lean, unintentionaly. Hope all that makes sense...
 

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number 1 think was already said, not looking through the turn/target fixation
second I think might be not trusting your tires. that one is a big problem for new riders.
 
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