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anyone have any tips on this? or if anyone is local and may wanna give me a hand with this? i would appreciate it..
 

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Where in NJ are you? It's not hard to just bleed them. First loosen the cap on the master cylinder reservior. Get a piece of tubing that fits snugly over the bleeder nipple. (ok, ok, I said nipple. :D ). Put the other end of the tubing in an old can or soda bottle. Open the bleeder nipple, squeeze the brake lever. Close the bleeder nipple, release the brake lever. Repeat until you see no air bubbles coming out. Keep a close eye on the reservior and add brake fluid as needed, don't let it run dry or you'll have lots of air in the lines. Close everything up and lightly tap on the lines to bring more air up, then repeat the bleeding procedure. When finished, tighten everything up and pump the brake lever. You'll do this one side at a time for the front. I like to start on the "high" side... the right. Another trick is, after you're done, hold the brake lever in overnight with a bungee. Then bleed again the next day.
 

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I picked up some speedbleeders for a few bucks and it made bleeding the brakes very easy. They have a one way valve in them so when you have them one turn loose all you have to do is pump the brakes and keep the master cylinder full.

www.speedbleeder.com Now it is correct
 

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Yeah, forgot to mention those, I have them too. Makes it a lot easier. The check valve in the speedbleeder means you don't have to keep opening and closing the bleeder nipple...just open it and pump the lever.
 

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What I do is submerge the hose attached to the bleed screw in a container with fresh fluid then open the bleed screw and start pumping away on the lever while keeping the resevoir full. You dont need to close the screw before you let off of the lever because aftre a few pumps the hose will be full of fluid and it cant suck any more air. This method uses more fluid which IMO is a good thing because you get a good flush. Start with the caliper farthest from the master cylinder.
 

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FullForce said:
What I do is submerge the hose attached to the bleed screw in a container with fresh fluid then open the bleed screw and start pumping away on the lever while keeping the resevoir full.
True only if you don't loosen the bleeder too much. Otherwise, you can still pull air between the threads of the bleeder and caliper, thus the reason some will teflon/seal the threads. Speedbleeders use a sealant on their threads and can be purchased on the site but there is probably an equal available on the commercial market for a much lower price.

It also helps to use a very tight fitting clear hose so you can see your progress and prevent air entry via the nipple.
 

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Although the speed bleeders make the overall job a lot easier, spending 15 bucks or so on a bleeder banjo bolt is the hot setup for truly bleeding your brakes. Unless you crack open the banjo bolt (with a towel underneath it) after you are finished bleeding the calipers, there is no way you will ever get all of the air out of the system without an MC bleeder. Remember that the air bubbles always travel to the top of any liquid. I have seen people pump a gallon of fluid through their brakes and never get the air out of the master cylinder area of the lines.

Check with Dan @ Street & Comp or LP Racing for the part, it's the best sub 20.00 mod you can make on your bike.
 

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As I am getting just enough rain to keep me from riding today, I decided to start getting ready for Grattan. :rolleyes:
So I spent most of the afternoon driving (not riding :rant: ) looking for Motul SBF600. Of course, y'all know I couldn't find it locally. (All was not lost though, I was driving the Z06 :D

Anywho, I got on my 'puker when I got home and surfed around and found a supplier which happened to be one I've used before for automotive stuff. They are selling 500ml. for $12.95. How does that compare to what you guys pay?

The real reason for this rambling is to post this brake fluid comparison I found while surfing. It's not a hard read and definitely geared to folks like me who are not interested in the theory and stoichiometry of any automotive fluid. However, I thought it interesting enough to share.

Check it out Brake fluid comparo
 

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FullForce said:
What I do is submerge the hose attached to the bleed screw in a container with fresh fluid then open the bleed screw and start pumping away on the lever while keeping the resevoir full. You dont need to close the screw before you let off of the lever because aftre a few pumps the hose will be full of fluid and it cant suck any more air. This method uses more fluid which IMO is a good thing because you get a good flush. Start with the caliper farthest from the master cylinder.
I've been using Fullforce's suggestion the last couple times, works well especially as a one person operation.

HG, I thought the new Galfer lines came with the bleeder m/c bolt but they DON'T! Not unless you get someone to throw them in. I just put on these and had to use my other m/c bleeder bolt on this set. I assumed it was going to have it, but it didn't. BTW, I like these alot better then the standard lines that pinched up against the fender.
Galfer straight threaded onto caliper lines/kit

BTW, the torque values are half of what the stock values are, I don't know why. M/C banjo bolt 12lbs, stock I think is 25lbs. I'm getting just tiny bit of a leak right at the crush washer and master cylinder (after zip tieing the brake lever for a couple hours). Should I torque the m/c banjo bolt a tincy bit more? I have shop paper towels surrounding the banjo lines around the m/c bolt and saw just a tiny area that was absorbed onto the paper towel.

Edit: sidenote - I ordered the lines pictured but was either talked into or sent the only ones they had (conversation when called on status). The one's I received are angled 90 degrees just after the caliper mounting. I gotta go, just stopped into work for a second. Later!
 

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SD,

Please elaborate or clarify why you say the torque value is 1/2? I just want to know the source of this info (manufacturer, DK, Superman or general concensus type of reference)

It's just that every time I've changed lines on my bikes, I've always used the factory torque values without any problems later. So,...
 

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Huh. The Galfer set I bought came with the MC bolt bleeder. They didn't used to, so I had purchased one for around $18, but then I ordered the lines and it was included for the same price as lines a friend had previously bought that didn't include it. Thought that was kinda odd. Maybe they've stopped including them again. :idunno:
 

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Skully said:
Harbor Freight sells a $4.00 brake bleeding kit which is worth its weight in gold.
Advance Auto Parts sells that same kit and I have it. It works good but my hoses started swelling from being stretched over the nipples in the kit and from the fluid and it doesnt hold a good seal anymore. :(
 

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maxib said:
SD,

Please elaborate or clarify why you say the torque value is 1/2? I just want to know the source of this info (manufacturer, DK, Superman or general concensus type of reference)

It's just that every time I've changed lines on my bikes, I've always used the factory torque values without any problems later. So,...
Superman? :rotfl: SuperDave is a nick name I got from friends (ref - SuperDave Osbourne) Believe me, not necessarily a compliment, but earned none the less. :smilebig:

The torque values are on Galfer's web site and in the instructions. Caliper adapter is 12 ft/lbs, line nut to adapter 6.5 ft/lbs, and double banjo bolt 12 ft/lbs. If you torque to stock specs you may crush the crush washer causing leaks.

[end of thread jack]
 
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