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Discussion Starter #1
Ok here is the deal. I keep blowing the 10A fuse for the blinkers and the brake light. It will usually take about 10-20min before it actually blows. I have aftermarket front and rear turn signals and the front running lights are fine so I started with the rear turn signals and disconnected them. I then played with the front brake, turning it on and off, and blew the fuse. I think I have it narrowed down to the brake light now. I recently replaced the rear shock and read on a previous post that the brake light wire runs pretty close to the rear shock. So I am planning on checking that next. I am pretty intimadated with the electrical system and would like to know any possible ideas of what it might be or where to start looking. :idunno:

Thanks,
George
 

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If you're using aftermarket signals and they are made by Lockhart Phillips, check to make sure they are not getting hot and shorting out. I've heard of issues where the bulb plugs into the socket, sometimes the positive contact for the bulb was in sideways (spring pushing it up) and it would be in contact with the housing for the bulb (ground) thus resulting in a short.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Right thats what I was thinking. So I completely disconnected the rear turn signals, put in a new 10A fuse and played with the front brake lever. The fuse still blew with leads me to believe its in the brake light wire....somewhere.


Jake said:
If you're using aftermarket signals and they are made by Lockhart Phillips, check to make sure they are not getting hot and shorting out. I've heard of issues where the bulb plugs into the socket, sometimes the positive contact for the bulb was in sideways (spring pushing it up) and it would be in contact with the housing for the bulb (ground) thus resulting in a short.
 

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Can you borrow or buy a multimeter? It would help trace the cause of the short and you will be certain when you have it fixed before blowing any more fuses.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
AMTFGH said:
Can you borrow or buy a multimeter? It would help trace the cause of the short and you will be certain when you have it fixed before blowing any more fuses.
I have never used a multimeter before but I am sure I can figure it out. How do you suggust I would go about troubleshooting for a short?
 

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gliberios said:
I have never used a multimeter before but I am sure I can figure it out. How do you suggust I would go about troubleshooting for a short?
With the fuse out and power off, set the meter to resistance (ohms) and connect one lead to the wire that feeds the stop light (green with yellow stripe on mine), and the other lead to ground. The meter will show infinite resistance or open-circuit normally, but in your case it could be showing low or zero number of ohms.

Then you will have to trace the harness from the tail light towards the front of the bike. Try moving the harness about a bit and you should find the point where the meter shows open then short circuit. It is handy to have a meter with an audible tone for short circuit.

Instead of ground, I should have said the bike's chassis somewhere....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
got it all figured out! Ended up being the connection to the rearset. I guess is got loose and heated up on the exhaust and was shorting out. Thanks for the help!
 

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gliberios said:
got it all figured out! Ended up being the connection to the rearset. I guess is got loose and heated up on the exhaust and was shorting out. Thanks for the help!
Great! Glad you found your shorts :D
 
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