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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hope this isnt a repost.


From someone stationed in Baghdad. He was recently bitten by a camel spider which was hiding in his sleeping bag. I thought you'd like to see what a camel spider looks like. It'll give you a better idea of what our troops are dealing with. Enclosed is a picture of his friend holding up two spiders.

Warning: not for the squeamish! :eek:
 

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Well now I understand why the spiderholes are so big in Iraq. I have heard that the spiderholes are so big that criminals have actually been known to hide out in them when the heat was on. :D
 

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GEEE-SUS!!!! and he lived to tell about it??? :eek: I have never, in my life, seen a spider that big...then again, I have never been to Iraq....I hope your friend is okay after being dinner for that "creature"....did he suffer any kind of side effects?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Wind Spider
Also known as Camel spider, Wind scorpions, Solifugid.
Galeodes arabs

Despite their fearsome appearance and their strong bite, solifugids are unlikely to harm humans. In the past they were considered venomous and extremely dangerous but it is now thought that the only risk of injury resulting from them is caused by shock or infection following a bite. There is no evidence of venom in any part of their body

This weird looking arachnid is not in fact a scorpion or spider at all but belongs to its own order- solifugid. This species can attain a leg span of 5" and a body of 2". Wind spiders are fast moving aggressive hunters, capable of over powering much larger prey than itself. Its front pair of legs are modified as feelers to detect and pull its prey into its large over sized jaws. Its three pairs of legs are capable of speed making this creature a fast moving killing machine.

They're not quite as big as your hand (unless you're a five-year-old), and very shy and secretive. They do like to hide in the shadows, and they do run very, very quickly for a critter (they can reach about 10 MPH, the fastest known non-flying arthropod). They make no noise whatsoever, they have no venom whatsoever, and they do not eat flesh--they eat small desert arthropods like crickets and pillbugs. The rumors of their attacking camels, or crawling onto sleeping GIs' faces, apparently stem from one of two things, both of which may be true to some extent: (1) they may use hair to line their burrow when they are about to lay a batch of eggs, said hair being clipped from dead camels or other dead mammals (and a sleeping GI is not much different), and/or (2) dead camels are covered with flies, and crawling over a camel corpse may make for a convenient way to get a good meal of flies.
We have camel spiders in the sandy parts of the southwest U.S. and Mexico (in Mexico they are called matevenados), considerably smaller than the Middle Eastern types, but of the same shy, unassuming habits. Completely harmless and beneficial critters, like the desert equivalent of a praying mantis.
 

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maybe he was speaking of shaq's hands.

you could race them across the desert for fun
 

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Discussion Starter #18
bubba said:
maybe he was speaking of shaq's hands.

you could race them across the desert for fun
hey, I was just posting the info that came with the pic. They're were a couple more pics, but not as clear as the first one. I agree those two spiders stuck together in the pic look pretty damn big compared to a hand!
 
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