Honda Motorcycles - FireBlades.org banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey I was just wondering if only using engine mods, (no nos & no turbo) could my 1998 900RR be made to run with the new 1000 cc bikes, I was thinking big bore 970, head work, cam, and big carbs. I was just wondering what your opinion was. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,390 Posts
maybe in a straight line but the 900 is a tank compared to the 1000, I think...:idunno:
but when its complete let us know, sounds awesome!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,278 Posts
I know there's one guy on here and another bored that made his put out about 153 at the wheel, he did a big bore kit but it wasn't as big as the 970

Sime where ya at, chime in here
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
it all comes down to the rider and the situations. When i had my f3 I could out ride many 1000cc bikes through the corners but in the straights they were gone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Yeah I doubt this bike will ever see a track since it's a streetfighter, right now it's a good everyday bike I just want the most power I can out of it without having to brake down and get a new liter bike... So as far as horsepower to the rear wheel can it match the new bikes, and if so what is the best way to accomplish it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
take the money you were going to spend building the motor and combine that with the sale of your 900 and buy a new 1000. The 900 will never handle like the new 1000s do, and once you put all that money into the motor, you will have a much more finicky motor that needs more maintenance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
If you ride the bike I wouldn't do it. You will end up spending a ton of money for a bike that needs more maint. and is much harder (breaks) parts. Adding 30-40 hp to a stock bottom end in an older bike is sure to break stuff. Plus the bike won't be worth any more money when you do go to sell it. Just ride what you got for now, and buy a new ride when your ready.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,390 Posts
take the money you were going to spend building the motor and combine that with the sale of your 900 and buy a new 1000. The 900 will never handle like the new 1000s do, and once you put all that money into the motor, you will have a much more finicky motor that needs more maintenance.

thats what I'm talkin bout!!!!!!!!!!:thumb:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,876 Posts
learn to ride the 900 to its fullest before thinking of upgrading. A lot more of it is in the rider than most think
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
543 Posts
If the 1000 is too pricey you could always get a 929 or a 954. They are also quite an improvement over the 900 IMHO. Please don't be offended when I say that riding a 900 once was all it took for me to decide that I didn't want one. It was love at first ride for me on the 929. It's only natural to want newer faster better whatever, there is value in being content with what you have. (which is a stinking fast bike) I agree with sinfuldragon about learning to master your ride. I am considered by friends to be an good rider, but I have a long long way to go before I would say that I have mastered the 929. I intend to practice until either I have mastered it or I reach my potential and I don't give a damn if I can keep up to anyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
take the money you were going to spend building the motor and combine that with the sale of your 900 and buy a new 1000.
Agreed. You will NEVER get your money back for your motor/transmission work. I bought my bike complete with motor/tranny work and carbs for $3800...so I did extremely well. Sell the 900RR, and put the balance toward a 1000RR. You can get them now for around $6500-7500.

asujosh1 said:
The 900 will never handle like the new 1000s do, and once you put all that money into the motor, you will have a much more finicky motor that needs more maintenance.
twojays280 said:
You will end up spending a ton of money for a bike that needs more maint. and is much harder (breaks) parts. Adding 30-40 hp to a stock bottom end in an older bike is sure to break stuff.
My Formula Xtreme 945cc 900RR makes 153.6 at the wheel and is insanely fast. It also handles extremely well - most likely very comparable to the 1000RR (but then again, it has many upgraded components on it).

That's a load of BS though about needing more maintenance and being finiky. I have had my bike since mid-03 and (apart from a faulty reg/rectifier plug) have NEVER had a problem with it. It runs in any weather, rain included and has come out of many Michigan winters (since 1995) to see the following riding season through without missing a beat. Now it's running around in Melbourne Australia just the same as it did in Michigan (my bike has been to 4 countries heh heh!).

Adding 30-40hp on any bike will challlenge the stock bottom end. That's why my bottom end had Titanium rods, lightened and balanced crank, as well as Cosworth forged pistons. So it's strong as a bull. If you are doing a big bore kit, you would as a matter of course change the rods, bearings and prep the crank.

Basically, it all depends on what parts you use, how you build it and how you maintain it. Me, I just use 10W40 Amsoil every 3000 miles, plus new Iridium plugs every two years. Hasn't seen me wrong.

A suitable big bore kit for the 918cc motor is a 973cc. However, it's going to cost you about $6-7K to do, maybe more......especially with a set of Keihin flatslide carbs which will be about $1200 alone, and you'd be advised to do an undercut transmission (gears 2-6). I know of a guy who built a 973 motor, totalled his bike in a wreck (not his fault, car's fault) and within the last 3 months was lucky to get $2K for it and that was WITH a set of 41mm flatslides. The motor only had 2000-3000 miles on the rebuild so it was practically new.

Just get a new(er) bike! Modding the motor is just not worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
"Adding 30-40hp on any bike will challlenge the stock bottom end. That's why my bottom end had Titanium rods, lightened and balanced crank, as well as Cosworth forged pistons. So it's strong as a bull. If you are doing a big bore kit, you would as a matter of course change the rods, bearings and prep the crank."

That's not what the original post stated. Yes if you spend that kind of time and money to create a strong bottom end you will not have as many problems and a strong reliable motor can be built. The original poster asked about doing a big bore kit, cams and headwork. Add that to a stock 98 900rr bottom end and you have a really fast grenade.

Why do people always take things out of context???:idunno:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,278 Posts
he didn't take anything out of context some things were made clear some weren't, so he just spoke from his experience is all
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
"Adding 30-40hp on any bike will challlenge the stock bottom end. That's why my bottom end had Titanium rods, lightened and balanced crank, as well as Cosworth forged pistons. So it's strong as a bull. If you are doing a big bore kit, you would as a matter of course change the rods, bearings and prep the crank."

That's not what the original post stated. Yes if you spend that kind of time and money to create a strong bottom end you will not have as many problems and a strong reliable motor can be built. The original poster asked about doing a big bore kit, cams and headwork. Add that to a stock 98 900rr bottom end and you have a really fast grenade.

Why do people always take things out of context???:idunno:
Whoa...steady down there fella!

Not sure what you are on about. I don't feel my response wasn't out of context in the slightest.

Along with head work and big carbs (presumably flat slides), the poster asked in a general sense about doing a big bore kit. He didn't go into detail on what comprises a big bore kit any more than what goes into headwork. In case you didn't realise it, the pistons and bore resizing that make up a big bore kit are a part of the bottom end. So how can this construe that the bottom end would now remain 'stock'?

Quite simply, a big bore 'kit' can, and should include rods, crank, flywheel and transmission mods as well. If you're implying that he intends to fit only the piston kit and leave the other OEM parts of the bottom end unchanged, then I'll pay that. But you are simply making an assumption here that he wasn't planning bottom end strengthening, as I too made the assumption that he might!

Given that, because he didn't go into the detail that we needed to know, I did. I answered with my own experiences, as Atreyu pointed out.

When someone goes to the the trouble and expense of breaking a motor down to do a big bore kit, if the person doesn't think of it themselves, usually the engine builder will suggest strengthening the bottom end to handle the increase in power. Because with the engine apart, that's the easiest time to do it.

Like I said, I don't see where any part of my response was out of context.:confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
maybe in a straight line but the 900 is a tank compared to the 1000, I think...:idunno:
Nope.

The 98-99 900RR was 396.8lb (180kg). The 2004/5 1000RR was 398.2lb (181kg).

These two models are much of a muchness, weight-wise.

That being said, this is still too heavy in relation to the current competitor literbikes. Honda realised this and put the '06 1000RR on a diet. The bike lost 17lbs, plus it picked up a 3% power boost! That has made the bike much more competitive.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top