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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all

I need to overhaul my brakes, they are two years old and were feeling tired the latter part of 2009. So I have been looking, and have come up with Bendix MRR pads and HEL SS brake lines. I was also thinking of Brembo pads and Goodridge brake lines or other combinations. I have only used OE pads, EBC HH pads and Goodridge lines in the past, I preferred the EBC HH over the OE pads but they went off before they wore out from a visual sense. Does anyone have any good or bad experiences or advice upon this?

Bendix MRR Racing Pads front Honda CBR900RR CBR1000RR @ moto-racing.co.uk

HEL Stainless Steel Braided Brake Lines @ moto-racing.co.uk



Thanks ............... Hoody :cool:
 

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Hi all

I need to overhaul my brakes, they are two years old and were feeling tired the latter part of 2009. So I have been looking, and have come up with Bendix MRR pads and HEL SS brake lines. I was also thinking of Brembo pads and Goodridge brake lines or other combinations. I have only used OE pads, EBC HH pads and Goodridge lines in the past, I preferred the EBC HH over the OE pads but they went off before they wore out from a visual sense. Does anyone have any good or bad experiences or advice upon this?

Bendix MRR Racing Pads front Honda CBR900RR CBR1000RR @ moto-racing.co.uk

HEL Stainless Steel Braided Brake Lines @ moto-racing.co.uk



Thanks ............... Hoody :cool:
I'm not super knowledgeable as a mechanic, but I'd be surprised if changing the lines would make any difference other than looking cooler (possibly). Have you tried the Carbon Lorraine pads? Some of my fast buddies rate them for both road and track. Also, have you tried fresh fluid?
 

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I'm not super knowledgeable as a mechanic, but I'd be surprised if changing the lines would make any difference other than looking cooler (possibly). Have you tried the Carbon Lorraine pads? Some of my fast buddies rate them for both road and track. Also, have you tried fresh fluid?
You clearly haven't tried steel lines. The difference is huge over stock lines.
I make my own lines using Goodridge clear-coated hose.
I run EBC HH's.
 

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you lose feel with stainless lines as there is no give at all.

i love ferodo street sinter (i hate ebc as they seem to hard)

try a fluid change and some good pads and i think you will be happy
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info, the HEL lines are a deffo for looks as well as function. Reading the info HEL are claimed to be better than Goodridge (how much psi they can withstand etc) they would say that :eyebrows: I might try the Bendix pads, just to see what they are like. I do like the sexey red Brembo's, I have some friends who rate them highly. :confused:

I hear you about changing the fluid, I have not changed it yet. While changing it, I thought I would change the lines and pads too :D

.............. Hoody :cool:
 

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FYI...the front lines are OEM braided from the junction down to the calipers on my RR5. Not many people are aware of this. The part from the master to the junction is regular line. I would think the new ones are similar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Not sure on the RR8, they just look like rubber. The new ones will be two lines, master to caliper direct, rather than a junction. I am sure you understand?

.......... Hoody :cool:
 

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You can tell because they are small diameter and have a smooth plastic covering. Should all be standard equipment on machines of this caliber.
 

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you lose feel with stainless lines as there is no give at all.
I disagree with this.
Feel is hugely improved because the lever is transmitting exactly what the caliper is telling you, without losing anything to pressure variations in the lines.
 

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I disagree with this.
Feel is hugely improved because the lever is transmitting exactly what the caliper is telling you, without losing anything to pressure variations in the lines.


well there's a surprise!!

so why don't manufactures fit them as standard to all bikes as there a cheaper option and as you say much safer as more feel!!

a lot of road riders don't like the rock solid feel you get with all braided systems.

honda don't fit full ss lines for this reason.
2 lines straight to the calipers is classed as a (for race set up)

personally i like braided lines cos they look good and are £50 instead of the stupid price honda charge for oe lines.

each to there own i suppose:)
 

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I disagree with this.
Feel is hugely improved because the lever is transmitting exactly what the caliper is telling you, without losing anything to pressure variations in the lines.

^^^This!

I currently have red Spiegler SS lines on my 09 repsol, and the EBC HH pads as well. Although I have been told that the Vesrah sintered pads are the way to go...
 

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well there's a surprise!!

so why don't manufactures fit them as standard to all bikes as there a cheaper option and as you say much safer as more feel!!

a lot of road riders don't like the rock solid feel you get with all braided systems.

honda don't fit full ss lines for this reason.
2 lines straight to the calipers is classed as a (for race set up)

personally i like braided lines cos they look good and are £50 instead of the stupid price honda charge for oe lines.

each to there own i suppose:)
I would think OEM lines would be a lot cheaper than braided lines. The price of OEM parts is totally irrelevant to what it costs to manufacture them. You might pay $10,000 for a bike but the cost of producing the actual bike you bought is probably $2000 at most. The rest is in transport, marketing, design, testing, infrastructure, legal compliancing, profit, warranty claims, insurances, racing sponsorship, etc.
I think the reason that very few manufacturers run them as OEM is that they have a limited life span.
I've never met a road rider that prefered OEM lines over steel lines but I'm sure there must be some around. Stock lines with fresh fluid every year work just fine for the vast majority of riders.
How on earth do you know the reason Honda doesn't fit steel lines?
The reason would be either cost or because they don't last as long as the flexible rubber lines.
Two lines from master cylinder to calipers is required under all roadracing regs I've seen but I don't know the reasoning behind it.
As for looks, I used to run plain steel braid but they're obvious to a roving eye and illegal on the road so I used to run them inside lengths of fuel hose to make them appear OEM :)
Now I use clear-coated Goodridge line which looks just like legal lines so I don't need to hide them despite them still being illegal.
 

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Were you aware the Blade comes stock with braided lines? I'm guessing that's what you mean by "steel lines."
Nope, I haven't seen an '08 Blade up close enough to notice.
So your point is not that steel lines won't make a difference generally, only on the 1000RR because it already has steel lines?
 

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I just did a _quick_ Google and couldn't find anything about the 1000RR having steel lines.
 

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I'm pretty sure the user manual recommends you change your brake fluid every 2 years so give that a try first.

I'd recommend you remove the pads from the caliper and give the inside of the caliper a good clean with an old toothbrush and warm water as well.
 

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I'm pretty sure the user manual recommends you change your brake fluid every 2 years so give that a try first.
Regardless of what the manual says, brake fluid has a _maximum_ life of two years even if you never use it. And if you overheat it just once it's ruined.
I recommend changing it yearly.
 

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answer to blade racers quote


like i said they remove some of the feel and that is why there not usually oe fitment on most bikes.



as for how do i know the reason honda dont fit full braided line as standand is there was a long article about it in motor cycle news a while back and the person answering the questions was the tech guy from honda UK so i think he would know.


The following article aims at describing how to prepare a bike for use on a track. In the first part we’ll deal with preparation of a road-legal bike for a track day, and in the second part the modifications for racing.
Track day preparation
Most organisations in the UK don’t have any special requirement in terms of bike preparation, so you can get away with minimal changes. In general they are all aimed at reducing the risk of damaging other riders so all plastic/glass parts that can splinter have to be removed or covered in gaffa tape. This include:
* mirrors
* indicators
* headlight/rearlight
* number plate
This will also reduce the cost of repair in case of a minor spill. Likewise, it may be a good idea to consider removing the side panels of the fairings (if applicable) before venturing on the track.
Everything else is common sense , so check the chain is properly tensioned and lubed, brakes are working and tyres have plenty of tread left: nobody will compliment you on your crashing skills in the wet when their session is delayed or canceled because of you. Talking of brakes, it is strongly recommended to fit braided hoses at the front: although they might remove a certain degree of feel, they will greatly reduce brake fading which would spoil your enjoyment after two laps.
 

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answer to blade racers quote

like i said they remove some of the feel and that is why there not usually oe fitment on most bikes.

as for how do i know the reason honda dont fit full braided line as standand is there was a long article about it in motor cycle news a while back and the person answering the questions was the tech guy from honda UK so i think he would know.

Talking of brakes, it is strongly recommended to fit braided hoses at the front: although they might remove a certain degree of feel, they will greatly reduce brake fading which would spoil your enjoyment after two laps.

And this guy stated that the reason they don't use them OEM is only due to reduced feel?
Despite them apparently (I haven't been able to confirm this) being standard fitment on Fireblades since '04?
The tech guy may well know the reason but that doesn't mean he's going to tell us what it is. Ask the people that were told numerous times that the '08 Blade was designed to burn oil to give you some idea of the honesty of company reps.
Steel lines allow you to more accurately modulate the brake and that to me is feel.
 
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