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I have one like this.....

BIKE-IT HEAVY DUTY CHAIN VICE TOOL

It works well.

As for a chain cutter... well if I am replacing a chain then it's because it is worn out anyway, so I just use a hacksaw. I think my riveter has a pin to push out the links if you really wanted to though.
You have to remove at least one plate to cut a new chain to length...
 
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I don't consider it essential to press the pins out of the plate as the plate will usually pry off with a screwdriver once you grind or drill the heads off. The OEM chain doesn't have a master link as far as I'm aware but otherwise you should be able to find the master link by the hollow pin heads and it's not too difficult to drill those out.
Then you just hook the new chain onto the end of the old one and pull it around the front sprocket. Loosen the adjusters, push the wheel as far forward as it'll go and cinch the axle nut to hold it place.
Hook the lower run of chain around the rear sprocket at about 2 o'clock and lay the excess top run over it to hold it in place.
Pull the top chain up off the teeth, pull it tight and hook the last roller into the last sprocket tooth adjacent to the end of the lower run of chain. Mark that pin and the next one with a texta or paint marker. Hook the old chain on and pull it back through so you can grind the pins off in a vice and then do the same to pull it back around the front sprocket. I would recommend removing the sprocket cover and cleaning all the crap out of there and inspect the front sprocket teeth (it does three-times more work than the rear sprocket) and spline, in which case you don't need to use the old chain to pull the new one through.
Put the _well greased_ o-rings on the master link, press it through the ends of the chain on the rear sprocket and put the _well greased_ outer o-rings on.
Press the plate over the pins and clamp the master link together so the plates are the same width apart as the links each side of it. Do not crush the plates together more than required or you risk damaging the o-rings. You can clamp it using the rivetor but large pliers work fine as well.
Set the back of the link into the base of the riveter and screw the rivet pin in to spread the rivet head. Do the same to the other pin.
If you don't have a riveter you can have a mate hold a sledge hammer against the back of the pin (through the wheel) and punch the rivet with a large nail (better if you grind the head of the nail round so it's about 50% bigger than the hole in the rivet).
Even easier, put a box alongside the swingarm about 400mm high and lay the chain on that (on its side of course, so you'll have to disengage it from the front sprocket or remove the sprocket from the shaft) to punch it.
 
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