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Discussion Starter #1
I've been riding for over 12 years with minimal incidents on a variety of bikes. But a couple of months ago I had a two minor drops at initial take off speed on a new bike luckily with minimal damage. At first I thought it was me not understanding the new bike but after taking it back to the dealer I soon found out it was a mechanical issue. The mechanic wondered how I could have ridden it the way it was. The point is that even though this information helped my ego I still questioned my ability and started re-thinking the events step-by-step to see if I did anything wrong.

I reviewed riding technique books along with my memory to figure out what things I could have done better to avoid the situations. In reviewing the books and my memory of the events I did find a few things I could improve on but they likely had little to do with the minor falls.

Several years ago and a couple of bikes ago I had two drops, one on the track and one on a mountain road during a too spirited ride with friends. Both were low sides, both due to overconfidence, and both were avoidable. As a safety conscious rider the mountain road ride occured during the late winter months on a nice day. I should have realized that road debris (gravel) could be on a turn even if gravel wasn't on other previous parts of the road. A friend of mine also joined me on the low side crash but luckily we weren't injured and the bikes suffered minor damage. I learned some great lessons that have helped keep me on my toes. Confidence is a fragile thing, do what you can to ride with it but not too much as it can get you in trouble.
 

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Marc, I live just across the state border in PA and I am a rider coach for the MSF. I hear stories like yours very often during the experienced rider courses. Maybe you should look into taking an erc. You would use your own bike and exercise techniques that are essential to riding. Taking a class would also increase your confidence besides your abilities. It seems your mind is set up to be a good, safe rider. Maybe a little push in the right direction would be beneficial.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the thought but I've taken all of the MSF courses. I'd like to consider myself an intermediate to advanced rider. And while I enjoyed taking MSF courses I think they could be improved to help new and continuing riders. I'm continuing to improve my skills by taking track days and track schools. I'm looking at a few for later this year. Thanks anyway.

Marc, I live just across the state border in PA and I am a rider coach for the MSF. I hear stories like yours very often during the experienced rider courses. Maybe you should look into taking an erc. You would use your own bike and exercise techniques that are essential to riding. Taking a class would also increase your confidence besides your abilities. It seems your mind is set up to be a good, safe rider. Maybe a little push in the right direction would be beneficial.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Always good advice when riding with a group. But you're right that people don't take this advice seriously at times. The low sides I noted happened about 10 years ago and they also helped me explore what I did wrong. I took classes, read books and articles and attended track days. This also helped me tame the spririted street rides and insist that riders that rode with us and especially newer riders to take it easy. We always tell new or less experienced riders to ride at their level and that we'll always wait at turns so they don't have to rush. In the past ten years we've only had one newer rider (a friend of a friend) go down but luckily he didn't get injured.

Anyone have stories or incidents that caused them to lose their confidence then find ways to get it back?

best advice: Ride your own Ride. often forgotten when the fun begins.
 
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