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Discussion Starter #1
not me - but a friend of mine has a new bike and I guess it as a lengthy headstem that was left 'extra long' so he could trim it - is this typically cut with a hacksaw, grinder, machine shop?

It's a pretty pricey ride and I didn't want to f it up on him but he asked for my help and I know there's a few of ya's here...some that are engineers :smilebig:
 

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You're talking about the "steerer tube" I think. The part of the fork that goes through the headset?

I've never personally done it, but I know the procedure is to wrap masking tape around the spot to be cut, use a new, fine toothed hacksaw blade, and saw patiently, do not force it through.

A hoseclamp will work as a guide.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
is the goal to end up with as flat/smooth surface as possible (I mean requiring extra precision and filing, polishing, etc to maintain squarness of the edge) to prevent fissuring or would the sawcut surface be ok.

I'm also aware of the low temp. of release for the resins involved, and was wondering if this would be a reason not to use a band saw or cutoff wheel etc.

lastly, respirator? mask? nuisance mask?

Thanks LTL :)
 

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Yep, as flat and smooth as possible. I personally would grind it square, but it's up to you.

I thought about the dremel, but probably wouldn't use it due to heat.

I'd just wear a regular old mask, and not be too worried about it, but if a respirator is handy why not?
 

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Have a shop do it for you. Most people I have talked to have given that advice. Expensive piece of hardware to destroy and it won't cost much to have them do it. If they screw it up, they will order you a new one.
 

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Have a look here:

http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=111

<H3>Cutting Steering Column- Threadless
It is recommend to use saw guide SG-6 to cut threadless steering columns. This tool holds the fork square to the saw blade. Use of a good quality and sharp hack blade is needed for a properly cut column. Generally, 24 teeth per inch are recommended for steering columns.


NOTE FOR CARBON FIBER: For carbon fiber steering column, a finer 32 TPI blade is recommended. To minimize dust from the carbon, keep the blade wet. If you prefer to use a "diamond rod blade", it is possible to install washers to widen the guide slot of the SG-6. Another option is to use the outer blade as a guide. Hold the diamond blade against the outside steel face of the SG-6. Align the cut mark to this outside face, and press gently against the tool as you cut. Note that this will visually mar the tool. Use a fine emery cloth to finish the end.
  1. Determine correct length of steering column. Mark column using marker or scribe.
  2. Place fork inside SG-6. Loosely secure handle.
  3. Move SG-6 saw guide opening over mark on column.
  4. Secure SG-6 handle and place SG-6 in vise.
  5. Cut through column. (NOTE: Cut with pressure only in forward direction. Do not apply excessive pressure on blade.)http://www.parktool.com/images_inc/repair_help/fork2.jpg
  6. Loosen handle and move column to slightly protrude past cover plate.
  7. Use flat file to finish end of column. Use round file or de-burring tool to remove sharp inside edge of column.
  8. Loose handle and move column further through cover plate. Leave handle loose to allow column to rotate.
  9. Rotate fork and use flat file to bevel outer sharp edge of column.
  10. Remove fork from SG-6.
</H3>
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the help dudes, appreciatate it.

Unfortunately this is him building his first bike and I beleive he needs the satisfaction involved with cutting it himself (or well, me cutting it is close enough) as I doubt he will go to a shop unless some crazy tools are required.

I have a 40tpi hack. blade and a damn good jig to get it inline with - I will just ask him to do the measuring 3-9x before we do this, cause we all know how good I am with that sorta stuff :D
 

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You don't have to cut it to final length all in one go. Shame to cut it and find out you've cut it too short.

If you are setting the bike up for the first time, and he is unsure of his riding position, I would suggest cutting the tube "long". i.e. leave it longer than you "think" you need it. Put spacers above the stem to take up the extra tube length as a temporary measure. A ride, adjust, ride some more, adjust again etc until your chum is happy with the bar height and then cut to final length. just my :twocents:
 
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