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Discussion Starter #1
Apparently, this question has been going on for quite a while in this forum, but, judging from previous threads, it still seems like a dilemma as to whether it makes sense to install a steering damper on a 98 CBR900RR, or not.
From one side, the majority of bloggers seem to agree that a steering damper is becoming more of an integral part of a motorcycle's chassis guaranteeing more stability, and safety.
On the other side, few devil advocates argue that a steering damper is installed only to counter-react against faults already apparent in a motorcycle's chassis, be that damaged suspensions, inappropriate damping settings, or any other mischiefs. Moreover on this opinion, if the chassis is revamped to perfection, you do not need a steering damper.
The reason as to why I am in pursuit of further opinions is that I am a firm believer that the CBR900rr is amongst the easiest bikes to steer no matter what speed or lean angle you are going at. Hence, I am concerned that installing a steering damper might hamper one of the most outstanding qualities of a 900rr, its steering.
However, while having my suspension settings leaning towards the standard and having the chassis in tip-top condition, I still encounter 'funny' situations that keep me staying up all night contemplating as to whether I should buy a steering damper. To cut it short, such situations include getting a feeling that the front end is not accurately mounted on the tarmac under heavy acceleration, and a heavy shaking of the bar experienced once at a speed of 260 km/h (162.5 miles/h) while encountering a sudden descent on the road.
I have researched the dampers in the market and the top notch ones are filthy expensive. Anyways, would a $180 Targa Daytona steering damper cut a deal, or would I be wasting my money?
 

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Steering dampers are something you really dont want to cut costs on(along with tires and brake components) With that said, ohlins and gpr make good ones for a decent price. I am a firm believer that you get what you pay for unless your buying a foot peg or lever etc. The damper will or should fix the problems you are having with the front end shaking but no matter what you do when your accelerating out of a turn (hopefully on a track) the front end is gonna loose some of its traction. You can mess with your front rebound a little to help it a little bit but only within reason.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Steering dampers are something you really dont want to cut costs on(along with tires and brake components) With that
Do you have any idea about the steering damper brand in focus (the Targa Daytona)? Is it the same as the Shindy Daytona?
 

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i believe they are the same company...im not a pro when it comes to their products though so i would double check that...im sure it will work....but it might not have the full potential of a ohlins damper...but i guess neither one of us would really know the difference unless we were rossi or stoner...
 

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Apparently, this question has been going on for quite a while in this forum, but, judging from previous threads, it still seems like a dilemma as to whether it makes sense to install a steering damper on a 98 CBR900RR, or not.
From one side, the majority of bloggers seem to agree that a steering damper is becoming more of an integral part of a motorcycle's chassis guaranteeing more stability, and safety.
On the other side, few devil advocates argue that a steering damper is installed only to counter-react against faults already apparent in a motorcycle's chassis, be that damaged suspensions, inappropriate damping settings, or any other mischiefs. Moreover on this opinion, if the chassis is revamped to perfection, you do not need a steering damper.
The reason as to why I am in pursuit of further opinions is that I am a firm believer that the CBR900rr is amongst the easiest bikes to steer no matter what speed or lean angle you are going at. Hence, I am concerned that installing a steering damper might hamper one of the most outstanding qualities of a 900rr, its steering.
However, while having my suspension settings leaning towards the standard and having the chassis in tip-top condition, I still encounter 'funny' situations that keep me staying up all night contemplating as to whether I should buy a steering damper. To cut it short, such situations include getting a feeling that the front end is not accurately mounted on the tarmac under heavy acceleration, and a heavy shaking of the bar experienced once at a speed of 260 km/h (162.5 miles/h) while encountering a sudden descent on the road.
I have researched the dampers in the market and the top notch ones are filthy expensive. Anyways, would a $180 Targa Daytona steering damper cut a deal, or would I be wasting my money?
It's entirely subjective. If you like the feel of a damper then you will be more comfortable with one. If you don't like the feel of them then you won't be able to live with having one on there. Nobody else can make the choice for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It's entirely subjective. If you like the feel of a damper then you will be more comfortable with one. If you don't like the feel of them then you won't be able to live with having one on there. Nobody else can make the choice for you.
That is exactly what I really need to understand. If I were to hate steering dampers after trying them on, in what sense would I despise them (hard steering going into corners comes to thought)?
 

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That is exactly what I really need to understand. If I were to hate steering dampers after trying them on, in what sense would I despise them (hard steering going into corners comes to thought)?
Lack of feel from the tyres.
Every tiny wiggle of the bars is a message from your tyres.
The damper dulls that.
 

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you either love em or loath them.[/quote]

:plus1: I love mine, as i have said before. On a ride to Beccles on sunday the bolt came out of mine, i didnt see it but i felt it so they do change the way the bike feels, you can dial it in so it can give you as much feed back as you need.
 

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The funny thing about steering dampers is they are coming factory installed on bikes now, even dirt bikes. I love having one on my road bike, and Bladeracer, I know you don't like having one:D but I do understand what you mean when it comes to myself riding in the dirt on a 450. Some of my friends have scotts dampers on there dirt bikes and they love it, but for me it seems a little silly for the simple fact that I want to feel everything underneath me. It is just getting a wobble on a road bike at a much higher mph that I like to know there is a little helper sitting on my triple clamp.
 

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I have a "Scott' on mine and another rider approached me and brought it to my attention he would prefer a dampener that is working from the get-go, not one that has to have a slap to become effective. I kind of know what he is trying to describe, but if anyone wants to elaborate on this, please do.
Thanks, Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #14
you either love em or loath them.
:plus1: I love mine, as i have said before. On a ride to Beccles on sunday the bolt came out of mine, i didnt see it but i felt it so they do change the way the bike feels, you can dial it in so it can give you as much feed back as you need.

By dialing it in to give as much feedback do you mean putting it in a softer setting?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The funny thing about steering dampers is they are coming factory installed on bikes now, even dirt bikes. I love having one on my road bike, and Bladeracer, I know you don't like having one:D but I do understand what you mean when it comes to myself riding in the dirt on a 450. Some of my friends have scotts dampers on there dirt bikes and they love it, but for me it seems a little silly for the simple fact that I want to feel everything underneath me. It is just getting a wobble on a road bike at a much higher mph that I like to know there is a little helper sitting on my triple clamp.
It's getting that high speed wobble you just mentioned that freaks me out. Going back to the factory installed dampers you just mentioned, maybe it is just the manufacturers' response to the bitchin of motorcyclists demanding a steering damper although they might actually not need one. You can sense that by reading the old motorcycle journalists' reviews of the 900cc-1000cc category in the late 90s. It was like a mantra that kept going on until manufacturers responded. Hmmmmm. Any thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I have a "Scott' on mine and another rider approached me and brought it to my attention he would prefer a dampener that is working from the get-go, not one that has to have a slap to become effective. I kind of know what he is trying to describe, but if anyone wants to elaborate on this, please do.
Thanks, Bob
Wait, does he mean a cheaper damper is actually better?
 

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By dialing it in to give as much feedback do you mean putting it in a softer setting?
Yes ....thats what i feel, i have a Hyperpro RSC, and i leave it were it is most the time, and like the stabillity it offers on are crap Norfolk roads.If you dont notice when you tyre is down by 10 psi then dont bother with one because you wont notice the difference it makes..................:idunno: :thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Yes ....thats what i feel, i have a Hyperpro RSC, and i leave it were it is most the time, and like the stabillity it offers on are crap Norfolk roads.If you dont notice when you tyre is down by 10 psi then dont bother with one because you wont notice the difference it makes..................:idunno: :thumb:
Well said man.
 

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I have a "Scott' on mine and another rider approached me and brought it to my attention he would prefer a dampener that is working from the get-go, not one that has to have a slap to become effective. I kind of know what he is trying to describe, but if anyone wants to elaborate on this, please do.
Thanks, Bob
I think hes talking about how some remain inert (inactive) until they sense a wobble or something wrong and then they kick in...i believe this is how the stock hesd works on my bike... these are good because it is like not having one on (ease of turning and good feel) until something goes wrong and then it kicks in and saves you...im not sure if other manufacturers make dampers like this or if thats even what he was talking about but just my .02.
 
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