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Discussion Starter #62
🤣

so.. hows the restoration of the 98 going? lol
progress has slowed a bit as I’m back at work now, started polishing the frame and it is a bit of a learning curve.... this is where I am at so far but when I have it the final polish the finish was nowhere near good enough
107409


need to go back a few steps and start again. Ian, do you have any advice? Just a basic step by step? A rough idea of how long it should take? I’m still scouring the internet daily for a replacement OEM front cowl but I do not believe they actually exist:cautious:
 

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Discussion Starter #63
The replacement carbs I bought are looking great and after swapping some bits over from my original set they are done and ready to go back on. I get paid next week so will order rear shock, radiator, chain and sprockets and maybe send the wheels for powdercoat.
 

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maybe send the wheels for powdercoat
Nigel and mrpickwick would probably recommend against powder coat. You could paint them black then hit them with a can of spraymax 2k clear coat and that should stand up pretty good. Or so I'm told on good authority
 

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Discussion Starter #65
Nigel and mrpickwick would probably recommend against powder coat. You could paint them black then hit them with a can of spraymax 2k clear coat and that should stand up pretty good. Or so I'm told on good authority
Really?! That would save me a good few ££ I wonder if I could get the finish good enough🤔
 

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With enough coats of clear and some sanding after, you should be fine. Look what you've done on the frame. I have faith in ya.
 

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Discussion Starter #67
With enough coats of clear and some sanding after, you should be fine. Look what you've done on the frame. I have faith in ya.
I guess I don’t have too much to loose, if they look crap I can send them to the painter anyway.... Anything that I can do at home to keep the budget down is worth a try!
 

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a can of spraymax is about $25-30 so i dunno what that means for you 'chaps' and you can do it over straight primer for black. i bought some pearls as well to use in top coats just to make it a little prettier.
 

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progress has slowed a bit as I’m back at work now, started polishing the frame and it is a bit of a learning curve.... this is where I am at so far but when I have it the final polish the finish was nowhere near good enough View attachment 107409

need to go back a few steps and start again. Ian, do you have any advice? Just a basic step by step? A rough idea of how long it should take?
Advice........:unsure::unsure:hmmmm, leave it alone?:LOL: OK, too late for that, so I'll give you some pointers.

There are 2 ways at going about it: 1-have the frame and swing arm dipped in a chemical solution to dissolve the anodization (makes it easier to get to the bare aluminum)
2-don't get it dipped, and be ready to use 100 Grit or Micron equivalent to sand it off. Using the 100 Grit to get the anodization off is "cheaper", but in the scheme of things dipping is better, as you have an untouched clean aluminum to work with. Using the 100 Grit puts some hefty scratches in the aluminum and adds days to the job to get them out.

Once you are ready to go at the bare aluminum, I would start with a wet 220 grit. I did all my frames by hand, so to answer questions about paste and rouges would be a misstep. I sand in one direction, constantly cleaning the paper in water and try to use the entire swath (I would cut the sheets to usable rectangles easily held with the hands.

When I was satisfied that I got the entire surface area done with that grit, I would then move onto 400 Grit, (I always use wet paper). This time I would not sand in the opposite direction of the way I sanded the previous grit. For example, on the 220 I went LEFT TO RIGHT. Using the 400 I would then go UP AND DOWN. Doing this exposes the scratches that the previous grit left behind, thus letting you get a visual of how much more sanding is needed with the current grit so no "opposite" scratches can be seen.
Repeat the process, alternating paths and changing grits from 400, to 600, to 800, to 1000, to 1500, to 2000. Also, when changing grits, ALWAYS be sure to clean the frame with a clean towel and water to remove the coarser grade material that has been left behind.

I would typically get a "test polish" on an area during the 600 grit stage to see where I'm at. Its also motivational, to see it start to shine is truly amazing.

How long should it take? Well, that's relative to the procedure you use. Power tools, sanding discs, and compound can surely shorten the time frame, but I learned by hand, and that TAKES FOREVER :LOL:

Either way, good luck, keep sanding and keep documenting (y)

My original 93, that was my first one (the wheels came polished), and my friends YZF750 that I did for him.

107410


107411

107412
 

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Discussion Starter #70
Advice........:unsure::unsure:hmmmm, leave it alone?:LOL: OK, too late for that, so I'll give you some pointers.

There are 2 ways at going about it: 1-have the frame and swing arm dipped in a chemical solution to dissolve the anodization (makes it easier to get to the bare aluminum)
2-don't get it dipped, and be ready to use 100 Grit or Micron equivalent to sand it off. Using the 100 Grit to get the anodization off is "cheaper", but in the scheme of things dipping is better, as you have an untouched clean aluminum to work with. Using the 100 Grit puts some hefty scratches in the aluminum and adds days to the job to get them out.

Once you are ready to go at the bare aluminum, I would start with a wet 220 grit. I did all my frames by hand, so to answer questions about paste and rouges would be a misstep. I sand in one direction, constantly cleaning the paper in water and try to use the entire swath (I would cut the sheets to usable rectangles easily held with the hands.

When I was satisfied that I got the entire surface area done with that grit, I would then move onto 400 Grit, (I always use wet paper). This time I would not sand in the opposite direction of the way I sanded the previous grit. For example, on the 220 I went LEFT TO RIGHT. Using the 400 I would then go UP AND DOWN. Doing this exposes the scratches that the previous grit left behind, thus letting you get a visual of how much more sanding is needed with the current grit so no "opposite" scratches can be seen.
Repeat the process, alternating paths and changing grits from 400, to 600, to 800, to 1000, to 1500, to 2000. Also, when changing grits, ALWAYS be sure to clean the frame with a clean towel and water to remove the coarser grade material that has been left behind.

I would typically get a "test polish" on an area during the 600 grit stage to see where I'm at. Its also motivational, to see it start to shine is truly amazing.

How long should it take? Well, that's relative to the procedure you use. Power tools, sanding discs, and compound can surely shorten the time frame, but I learned by hand, and that TAKES FOREVER :LOL:

Either way, good luck, keep sanding and keep documenting (y)

My original 93, that was my first one (the wheels came polished), and my friends YZF750 that I did for him.

View attachment 107410

View attachment 107411
View attachment 107412
I used a scotch brite type disk on a grinder to remove the anodised coating but if you are not super careful it can take away too much material but I think If I am careful I can get to the bare metal this way without too much work to remove the finish left behind.

The pictures of the bikes you have done confirm that this is a road this young Padawan must walk, a process that must be complete to the standards you have shared, I will not let you down polish master ☺
 

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Discussion Starter #71
Quick update, I have sanded the wheels and triple clamps ready for paint and made good progress polishing the frame, I am waiting on a delivery of sandpaper and will finish the frame when it arrives. I will update with some pics once complete.

I have had a go at cleaning up the forks and a lot of the much has come off, I plan on painting the bottoms. Only problem is the gold anodising on the main body is pretty rough so not sure what to do with it....
 

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Wet painting the wheels is definitely the way to go, In the past I’ve had wheels powder coated and have had mixed experiences, on steel wheels on an old MG, fine, no problem, on alloy/magnesium wheels I’ve had it chipped off on the rim when tyres were fitted and on magnesium Porsche wheels I had it come off in huge chunks. They leave the factory with painted wheels, it’s more durable.
 

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Discussion Starter #73
Wet painting the wheels is definitely the way to go, In the past I’ve had wheels powder coated and have had mixed experiences, on steel wheels on an old MG, fine, no problem, on alloy/magnesium wheels I’ve had it chipped off on the rim when tyres were fitted and on magnesium Porsche wheels I had it come off in huge chunks. They leave the factory with painted wheels, it’s more durable.
that’s interesting, I was always under the impression that powder coating the best. I bought all the paint and lacquer but was considering powder coating anyway but I will have a go at painting them myself now
 

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I think powder coating is of similar properties to baked enamel. Remember the old blue collar workers enamel cups in white with a blue edge? You'd drop them or knock them and a whole hunk of paint would fall off. My view was that conventional paint is better. However, I have just read this informative review. It seems a lot depends upon the type of powder used:
 

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There is an undercoat for non-ferrous material available. It may be required for binding correctly to aluminium alloy, magnesium alloy etc. I am not an expert in this area but I have a good paint shop locally that sets me up each time I have a paint project. Have a chat with your local and see if they are helpful or salesmen.
 

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Discussion Starter #76
So I have painted the triple clamps wheels are prepped ready for paint as well as the fork bottoms. The frame is polished (as well as I could but by no means perfect) I managed to acquire a hydraulic bike lift today so that should make the rebuild process easier. Ordered a full service kit, fluids etc, exhaust port gaskets, clunker workshop manual, water pump cover gasket and generator cover gasket. The generator cover has been leaking and someone has used a load of sealant c**p so hopefully a new gasket and a clean up will be an easy fix (fingers crossed)
 

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Check the engine case as well as the side cover for cracks. If it’s been down on the left side it’s a good possibility. My 99 was missing a good chunk of engine case.......
107615
 

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Discussion Starter #79
Looks ok at a glance, once the gaskets come I will pull the cases off and give everything a proper clean. I tig weld myself but anything finicky like cast aluminium I have a friend who is the grand master of anything Tig so hopefully he could fix any nasties. Did you have that repaired Ian?
 
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