Honda Motorcycles - FireBlades.org banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I put the full Ti Remus on the K last Saturday. Took it to SB Motorsports to see what HP it has. It's not what I expected or wanted, but it's not bad. Especially for a BMW. The tech said it is running a little rich. Once I get that solved I should get a few more ponies out of her. He didn't run the torque value because he didn't want to take the side panel off.

It still runs great, no problems what so ever. The Electronic Suspension Adjustment is the greatest invention in the world. It handles very well in the twisties and hopefully, someday soon I can get enough time off work to get to a trackday. I can put the wife on the back, toss on the panniers and take a nice long trip, and we are both fairly comfy. It handles great with her on the back and she doesn't get as much wind as she did on the 929 or the Busa. It comes with M1's, and I think I have switched brands. I used to only run the Bridgestones, but I like the grip and feedback from these tires, on this bike. Not sure if I will even try the Bridgestones on this bike. This thing is just a blast to ride. I am still waiting for the first run issues to show up. So far so good....
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
My friend Nate's k1200R race bike saw 156 at the rear wheel on a Factory Dyno, at Road America, a few weeks ago... Laser Hotcam pipe & chip are the sole engine mods.
FWIW, 13.8:1 is stoichiometric, anything above that would be considered rich...
Cheers,
Lance
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,271 Posts
Gigantic said:
My friend Nate's k1200R race bike saw 156 at the rear wheel on a Factory Dyno, at Road America, a few weeks ago... Laser Hotcam pipe & chip are the sole engine mods.
FWIW, 13.8:1 is stoichiometric, anything above that would be considered rich...
Cheers,
Lance
Stoichiometric is rarely used as a basis for making power on reciprocating engines, rather as a theoretical starting point used for economy (in a perfect world where the air composition follows the base formula). I don't think you could find a single bike on the grid at a Superbike/FX/Endurance/GP race that was tuned anywhere near stoichiometric. Most of them are tuned between 12.5 and 12.8 to 1.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I'm sorry, I misquoted earlier: Stoich is 14.7:1 or Lambda value 1 which is the chemically correct ratio of air to fuel for complete combustion to take place. while the bulk of my knowledge is focused on boxers, I can say BMW's are tuned a bit differently, however and max power is usually closer to 13.8:1, given the mild cam profiles and other components. the closed loop ECU/FI systems aim for 14.7:1, but their systems are pretty crude, and not very accurate stock. it looks like it's running rich in the open loop portion of the map(80-100% throttle) leaning it out might make more power, rather than dumping more fuel. It would be interesting to see what happens with ram air thrown into the mix, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,271 Posts
Gigantic said:
I'm sorry, I misquoted earlier: Stoich is 14.7:1 or Lambda value 1 which is the chemically correct ratio of air to fuel for complete combustion to take place. while the bulk of my knowledge is focused on boxers, I can say BMW's are tuned a bit differently, however and max power is usually closer to 13.8:1, given the mild cam profiles and other components. the closed loop ECU/FI systems aim for 14.7:1, but their systems are pretty crude, and not very accurate stock. it looks like it's running rich in the open loop portion of the map(80-100% throttle) leaning it out might make more power, rather than dumping more fuel. It would be interesting to see what happens with ram air thrown into the mix, though.
Real ram air is .7 atm, so it would skew the curves right off the graph.

BTW, if that graph is based on typical dyno procedure, it represents 100% throttle from the bottom on up to the limiter. It is fairly useless as it isn't plotted vs rpm which makes the HP readings a guess at best.

Stoich is also based on certain properties of gasoline which have not been present in pump gas since the late 60s as well as the classic 78/21 percent ratios of nitrogen/oxygen which rarely exists anywhere in North America any longer. Regardless of cam profiles, dwell etc.; staying closer to 13 to 1 should yield more outright power throughout the power band.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,271 Posts
As an afterthought, stroichiometricity really has nothing to do with engine performance whatsoever. All it represents is a theoretical point of complete burn, which in practical terms is impossible in any real life reciprocating engine. There are so many additives to any fuel used for recip engines, that burning 100% of all of them at any single A/F ratio is a wish in one hand and $hit in the other. It also doesn't represent any relation to power/efficiency etc. since all it refers to is 100% of the input fluid's properties (gasoline) being spent during combustion.

If commercially available fuels were 100% gasoline and you had a sealed room with a perfect sea level pressured mix of definition quality air with a single cylinder low revving engine run at one exact RPM continously, you might be able to approach stroichiometricity. That same engine run at a higher or lower A/F ratio may in fact make substantially more or less horsepower, but there is no direct relationship between the classic stroichiometric A/F ratio and engine performance without factoring in at least a dozen other variables beyond the elemental composition of the combustion components (which present hundreds of variables by themselves).
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top