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Discussion Starter #1
The Emerald Ash Borer is devistating the midwest. It travels by transporting firewood from infested areas to uninfested areas and the cycle starts over. The USFS and cities are trying to control the pest with total eredication of the host plant (Ash Trees). All wood is being chipped up into sizes no larger that 1in by 1in od 2 sides. The pest cannot live in wood that size. People do your part and do not transport ash wood from infested areas or just outside of it and translocate the borer further across the US.

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I'm very familiar with the EAB problem. The bug first entered the country through cargo ships here in Detroit. It was discovered and identified in 2001 by a local arborist in my community working with Michigan State University's Entomolgy department. Our community has developed an insecticide and implemented an injection program that has been very successful. This hits close to home for us as we watched our entire Dutch elm tree population get decimated through the 60's and 70's. Many of the elms were replaced by Ash trees which now could face the same demise. :crap:

http://detnews.com/2004/specialreport/0410/10/a15-298570.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #5
RR, many insecticides will control EAB. The problem is the time frame that the insect is most vulnerable to the insecticide and the size of the host plant.
 

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True, and maybe stating the obvious. Just as with DED, finding the right insecticide is the key. The EAB problem is front page news around here...it's impact is potentially devasting in our heavily wooded community.
 

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I have approximately 10 wooded acres of what use to be over 4500 elm and around 1000 ash along with several varieties of maple, oak, willow and blue spruce. I now have less than 100 elm and 200 ash thanks to the incompetence of our US Border and customs departments (read the history of Dutch Elm disease, it reads like an episode of the Simpsons). I spend approximately 4 hours every weekend during the better weather months chipping the ash and elm, so in some portions of the property it looks like a Oregon clear cut while the rest looks like a surreal post nuclear response landscape with every other tree lying against the next . . .
 

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Sucks that you lost all those trees, Abtech. :crap:

Isn't there some other beetle around, too, now? An Asian one, I think? It's kind of black and white speckled? I forget the name of it, but it's been a problem in the northeast.
Another big tree killer around here back in the 70s was Gypsy moths. They particularly liked oak. I don't see many big oak trees around here anymore.

I had to take down a big, old silver maple in my yard recently. Hated to do it, but it wasn't in very good shape. Lost a big old sasafrass, too. I like big trees in the yard. The silver was going to fall on my garage, though.
 

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As anyone knows that lives in michigan, if you go up north camping, for godsakes do not take your own firewood. I don't know why this concept is so difficult for people to understand. The DNR has taken to heavy fines for anyone caught transporting wood without the proper authorization. Good post and hopefully this information will be spread to those that need to hear it.:thumb: :plus1:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
HondaGalToo said:
Isn't there some other beetle around, too, now? An Asian one, I think? It's kind of black and white speckled? I forget the name of it, but it's been a problem in the northeast.
Asian Longhorn beetle.

It is pretty much under control now.

The problem with pests from other countries comming into the US is there are no natural prediators for these foreign pests here, That is why they take over with such ease.

Dutch Elm Disease is an airborne disease not a insect which is almost impossible to control.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
RR you are right. The fungus is spread by 2 types of beetles and also by root grafting of similar species. The spores can transport via air when in close proximity to other host trees if the spores are close enough to the bark. The fungus cloggs the cambium layer of the tree which inturn inhibits tramsportation of vital nutrients to the tree.
 

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Hammer said:
RR you are right. The fungus is spread by 2 types of beetles and also by root grafting of similar species. The spores can transport via air when in close proximity to other host trees if the spores are close enough to the bark. The fungus cloggs the cambium layer of the tree which inturn inhibits tramsportation of vital nutrients to the tree.
. . . and in densely wooded areas can travel root to root in adjoining trees. I clear cut and ground the roots of the cut trees around one area and the 4 remaining trees are still pretty healthy. Sort of like starting a "break fire" to stop a fast moving forest fire. I just don't have the time or resources to do this on a large enough scale to make a difference.

I lost a 120 year old Elm next to my office and four 80+ year old Elm volunteers in my front yard last year and the property doesn't even look like the same address anymore.
 

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abtech said:
.I lost a 120 year old Elm next to my office and four 80+ year old Elm volunteers in my front yard last year and the property doesn't even look like the same address anymore.
It's almost akin to losing a loved one. My neighbor has 100+ year old Elm that is one of the biggest trees I've ever seen. He injects, sprays, and has it pruned religiously to help ensure it's longevity.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Abtech, spraying with a fungiside and insecticide is the only hope of keeping it healthy. Some species of elm are more resistant than others to the disease.
 

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Red Rider said:
It's almost akin to losing a loved one.
Yeah, it is, isn't it? I have a huge nearly 50 year old "Christmas tree". In my front yard. I don't know what kind of pine it really is, but it looks like a balsam christmas tree. It was my parents' first Christmas tree in '57 and it sat on the bay window in my living room. My Dad stuck it out in the front yard. It takes up a good third of the front yard, offering excellent buffer. It's a beautiful tree. If something happens to it, the yard wouldn't look the same, and I'd probably mourn it.
 

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HondaGalToo said:
Yeah, it is, isn't it? I have a huge nearly 50 year old "Christmas tree". In my front yard. I don't know what kind of pine it really is, but it looks like a balsam christmas tree. It was my parents' first Christmas tree in '57 and it sat on the bay window in my living room. My Dad stuck it out in the front yard. It takes up a good third of the front yard, offering excellent buffer. It's a beautiful tree. If something happens to it, the yard wouldn't look the same, and I'd probably mourn it.
That is a very cool story. Your parent's first Christmas tree? :thumb:
 

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Hammer, is this what you do for a living or something?
 

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luvtolean said:
That is a very cool story. Your parent's first Christmas tree? :thumb:
Yup, my parent's very first tree after the house was built and they moved in. I'm pretty sure it was '57. They were married in '55, I think. My Uncle built the house for them. My folks have been gone for about 8 years now. I bought out my bro, keeping the house. I've been gradually doing upgrades, windows, doors, air conditioning. Also the usual painting, papering. I grew up here, so it's cool fixing up the place. Just finished a garage addition for the bikes, mower, junk, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I am a Certified Arborist through the Internatioal Society Of Arborculture. I am employed at an electric utility company as an Assistant Supervisor in the Vegitation Management Dept. I have been in the industry since 1986. We have our own inhouse tree crews working on the property. I usually do not deal with bugs and disease too often but I do have to have a good general knowledge to keep current for our members benifit and to protect the company. I also hold a herbicide licence for Right of way and also hold one for Aquatics use.
 
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