Honda Motorcycles - FireBlades.org banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My engine is making a weird knocking sound. I didn't notice it when I bought it. I drove out home for an hour and a half straight no problem. I started it today and there was a loud clicking. The oil was two quarts low. The sound got lighter but is still ther . Did I mess up my engine?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
433 Posts
It's not a good sign. I would remove the oil filter, cut it open, look for metal. Change the oil, see how much metal suspended in the oil, drains out into the pan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you. I work on my own cars, I'm kind of new to bikes but I don't trust mechanics. Do you know of a manual I could look at? I've been looking bit they've all been takin down.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
474 Posts
What 26 said. Cut out a cardboard square, draw the sump pan on the cardboard. Stab the holes where the sump pan bolts are located, so the right length goes back to the same hole.

Inspect sump pan debris. Probably piston skirt material. Inspect cylinder walls for line scores.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Honestly I need to see scmatatics before I take any thing out. I'll buy the book of I have to. I got a good deal on the bike, I just don't want to ruin it brow I can enjoy it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
474 Posts
Take a compression reading before any work is done. Big difference between pulling the sump cover and pulling the engine. When the service manual says, comp is between 147 ~ 228 psi, 146 is when I write on the work order, 'comp out of spec, upsell a top end job' and roll the bike off the rack, grab another work order, rack the next bike.

Signed,
Knock-knock, who's there?
Do the work, do the work who?
You, or chase your tail.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,132 Posts
Stick a tag in the exhaust and get a short video if you can. Injectors with some milage tick lightly, and the 54s are known to get a light knock at startup with some good mileage on them. Mine sometimes does it when cold, but never when warm (also seems to not do it if I squeeze the clutch in til it warms.. )
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
474 Posts
What's a sump pan?
Engine configuration wise:
Harley engine case = Dry sump ~ remote oil tank.
Harley engine case half = Vertical cut closes the case are 2 halves bolted together.

Wet sump engine case = has no remote oil tank but holds the oil in the case.
Wet sump engine case = uses horizontal cuts to close the case like a Harley.
Wet sump engine case = closes with a bottom cover (sump); lower case (half); upper case (half)... all in horizontal cuts to make a case close or seal in the oil.

Dry sump engine = 2 piece case.
Wet sump engine = 3 piece case.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
474 Posts
(also seems to not do it if I squeeze the clutch in til it warms.. )
Knock = Goes away when I pull the clutch in cold or hot.
Knock = Does not matter the lever squeeze, it knocks either way.

Knock goes away clutch pulled in = Throttle sync.
1. Crank comes around one cylinder lags the other.
2. Bang goes the crank, spin goes the chain or gear mesh (no chain).
3. The lag cylinder fires, bang goes the clutch basket is not smooth in pulse.

Knock remains clutch in or out = Piston tick to rod knock. Knock is rod, tick is piston.
Rod vomit = Bearing or insert disintegration is copper coating , aluminum slivers.
Piston skirt spit = Just aluminum only or a gray coating added with the aluminum. You do not want to see copper chips.
Knock Smell = Oil cap off, empty lungs; say sniff-sniff, smells like??? A metallic burn to it. No longer oil and that sweet smell of no gas mixed with it, but maybe some, but more burned or not smelling too oily flavorish.

Only a dropped sump pan/cover knows for sure, unless you pop open the oil filter and separate the pleats. That's a lot easier than removing the exhaust, radi out of the way to drop the sump cover and inspect. Then you know for sure the engine comes out for full inspection... especially the poor oil pump blades.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Honda have a notorious noisy clutch, if it goes away when clutch is pulled in don't worry, if it goes away when bikes warmed up then don't worry about it.

If it only goes away when clutch is pulled in, you need to inspect the bearing on the clutch, but don't worry the sound will come back eventually.

Like I said Honda clutches are always bad for sound, you should hear my X-11 you would crap a brick when its cold with clutch lever out.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
474 Posts
I was schooled by the 'Father of the Bellow'... a CB750 inline-4. Never, have I ever had to change a clutch bearing, main shaft bearing, needle bearing style, let alone the many posts of changing out the main shaft bearings for clutch noise and where are they?

You need to show me the noise goes away with clutch in? Then, no locking load on the bearing, that thing should hammer away with no load, right? So, bearing noise is out, no experience pulling even one bearing off the CB. Transmissions right and left, you bet, engine cases with chains thru the case? Plenty. We seeing a pattern soon?

Carb/needle/slide:
1. The linkage wear and tear is the slide now is worn, air runs even more around the slide than under it.
2. Needle is its own independent, as the machine to tap the hole starts at north, the next hole starts south, when the tap randomly stops in this position. I have to sync these so each taper balances.
3. Carb has 4 bouncing babies to smooth out, so the slides need to be sunk. That up and down, match my slide linkage is how close when done, the sync goes off tune in a few hundred miles. And no carb work is touched in the beginning of all this. A bungee corded to the WOT position is the first move.
4. The valves are set so no one gets away with being stuck open on the test. The compression tells who is the bouncing baby that is going to poop up the diaper bang-bang is the mess is going on here?
5. How many of those bearing sitting on a bench, helped against my intro to the carb linkage alone, comp being the #1 baby boomer that calls the balls dangling in the diaper you call a cage.

6. Hello crankshaft are you one gram away from being balanced enough to run with the water on the tank, look at that glass smooth surface. Except you drag a chain or rub up against a gear mesh and that still won't help the chitty-chitty-bang-bang difference against the clutch center. Clutch center holds the fibers in a lock. Ticktock goes the fiber's fork tangs against the clutch outer's long forks. Add, for every action/opposite and equal or unequal sync-compression change... is like dropping one rock on a clear pond and watch the single wave. Then, thousands of stones come next, random are the throws, not timed like the first one thrown. Make a little sense now?

7. Here comes the gray matter if you read down to here about you splitting cases chasing bearing wear, where it's more like the clutch outer and how it's one big bell, ding-ding, hello? How close am I getting off the bearing noise or bang-bang one fart is not as powerful as the next purge being pressured. A sync would get it close.

8. Lag goes the other low compressor pissing on the other side of that diaper theory, gimme that sheet about Bearings vs. Bellow-bong-bang-bing-bang-wha-la-lotta gray matter on the net one searches for a cage of balls banging in your mancave is all you're hearing.

By any chance we have an Ears Nose and Throat Specialist in the house?

Signed,
NOLTT (not only looks tupid tizz!) :smilebig::eyebrows::spider::allears:

:stirpot::hitfan:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
How many miles?? does it sound like a dead blow, like a hammer lightly hitting the engine?? Yes, look for metal, do your compression. I would lean towards a rod knock, it happens more than you think with these motors. Sad but true, went through it myself. Same thing, picked up a 94 900, ran fine, no noise no nothing. Got it home, changed the oil, rode it a few times. Started it one day and started getting a knock. Not saying thats you but, don;t be surprised. The good news it;s it is something you can do yourself cheap, about 150 bucks, bearings gaskets and all and its a no brainer, not like a car measuring everything. The sizes are spelled out for you on the crank and the rods, you just match the number and letter and your usually good to go. I'm not saying don;t check the measurements but 9 times out of ten if the journals are clean you can just bolt it back together. Good luck!!

Paul
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
454 Posts
The good news it;s it is something you can do yourself cheap, about 150 bucks, bearings gaskets and all and its a no brainer, not like a car measuring everything.
You can't rebuild any engine properly without measuring everything. The fact that the tolerances are marked on the crank/rods is meaningless if the engine has suffered a bearing failure; without measuring it you don't know if the crank pin is still within tolerance, or oval etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Any updates New2954 ? How about a short video, like RRDemon, suggested ?
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top