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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys,

Recently moved to Switzerland and using the blade on mountain passes and generally tight twisting and hairpin type roads.

Got a Power Commander V and Yoshimura slip-on set up which has been great in the UK, but which has to go soon to meet Swiss regulations.

I'm finding getting drive out of turns really difficult and all the power coming in just as I'm on the brakes for the next turn. The blade also seems a real handful on the tight roads which change direction very quickly.

Looking for some advice on how to improve my speed on these roads. It's running OEM Bridgestone tyres, a 190 on the back.

Starting to wonder if gearing changes might help or if the in-line four is not really cut out for this terrain.
Cheers

Repper
 

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I'm finding getting drive out of turns really difficult and all the power coming in just as I'm on the brakes for the next turn.
Sounds to me like you're shifting way too early. Try keeping the revs up above, say, 8000 at all times.
 

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One word. Elevation.

Your pc will need a map/retune. The higher elevation will have significantly less oxygen in the air to burn with all that fuel the pc is sending for closer to sea level conditions.

I would go so far as to take the pc off not only for the regulation check, but it might also run better until you have a map more suitable.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Interesting thought, can 2000 metres make such a big difference to fueling?

It's running smoothly and revving cleanly, just seems to bog down from a closed throttle.

Well I'll strip out the exhaust and PCV and see what stock goes like.

Cheers
 

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Interesting thought, can 2000 metres make such a big difference to fueling?

It's running smoothly and revving cleanly, just seems to bog down from a closed throttle.

Well I'll strip out the exhaust and PCV and see what stock goes like.

Cheers
Yes, it could do. Is it worse than before? That's all that has changed. The thin air is thinner, so the bike will run richer. That could show up as bogging down depending on how it was tuned with the PC. Fi bikes have an air density sensor, which should sort it out for you, however 2000m is actually quite a long way up.

Consider a Quill t3, they are quiet as stock at standard but growl nicely up through the range. They are BSAU marked but IDK about E-marked or TuV or whatever is the Swiss equivalent.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Great info, I assume that reconnecting the OEM O2 sensor helps performance, does anyone know if its wide or narrow band though?
 

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So the new exhaust required removing that?

Although I really was referring to the air pressure sensor in the airbox (MAP / MAF sensor), yes, reaffixing the O2 (lambda) sensor is likely to make a difference!

You haven't yet said which year model. Based on car experience, earlier vehicles have narrow, later has wideband sensors although IDK about bike Fi as I live in a timewarp with carbs. T595 was a bad experience and put me off!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's a CBR1000RR 2009. The Yoshimura had a O2 eliminator fitted so it was not a closed loop system.
 
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