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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all. Just wondering about floating discs on my 1997 fireblade. It says in the spec sheet that they're floating discs, but mine are completely frozen. I saw this on youtube.


Seems legit, but my bobbins don't look like that. They have an extra silver rivet in the middle. Can I still use this method? Thanks!

Picture:




Edit: Yes, EVERYTHING is frozen on my bike :p
 

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Hey all. Just wondering about floating discs on my 1997 fireblade. It says in the spec sheet that they're floating discs, but mine are completely frozen. I saw this on youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qoPqN2GBdw

Seems legit, but my bobbins don't look like that. They have an extra silver rivet in the middle. Can I still use this method? Thanks!

Picture:




Edit: Yes, EVERYTHING is frozen on my bike :p
Yes, those are fully-floating discs.
It simply means the disc rotor is a separate piece from the carrier. The rivets allow lateral "float".
 

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I think you'll find that the RR bobbins are holding the disk a lot tighter than the ones in that video. I've never been able to budge a disc like that on my bikes. I can't say it would work or not, but I don't think you'll be able to move an RR disk like he did. They are full floaters as Bladeracer said, thus the disc is attached to the carrier, which is rigidly mounted to the rim. In contrast to a CBR600 F2, where the disk is mounted rigidly to the rim and the CALIPER floats on the pivot pins. Like your RR's rear brake disc/caliper, well until you free it up. :)
 

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I think you'll find that the RR bobbins are holding the disk a lot tighter than the ones in that video. I've never been able to budge a disc like that on my bikes. I can't say it would work or not, but I don't think you'll be able to move an RR disk like he did. They are full floaters as Bladeracer said, thus the disc is attached to the carrier, which is rigidly mounted to the rim. In contrast to a CBR600 F2, where the disk is mounted rigidly to the rim and the CALIPER floats on the pivot pins. Like your RR's rear brake disc/caliper, well until you free it up. :)
Road bike discs are generally tighter than race discs, race discs tend to be fairly noisy.
 

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Road bike discs are generally tighter than race discs, race discs tend to be fairly noisy.
Yup, absolutely. Just as my 320 cast irons did on my first 900. Rattled like a son of gun over bumps. The bobbins, or rivets as we call them were easily replaceable as well.

 

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I didn't realize they were supposed to be so tight. So do you guys think it's not a problem that they won't budge?
I don't think you have a problem. I always remembered them being very tight and almost impossible to maneuver by hand (the discs that is). I've never tried to spin a bobbin as the video showed. But I think the Honda ones are just too tight for that. Unless you have crazy uneven wear or a significant pulsation you should be good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That's actually the problem... I recently developed a slight pulse under braking, and the right rotor is a little wobbly (very slightly). I was gonna try to free the bobbins and put in new pads before resorting to buying new discs, as those are really expensive.
 

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That's actually the problem... I recently developed a slight pulse under braking, and the right rotor is a little wobbly (very slightly). I was gonna try to free the bobbins and put in new pads before resorting to buying new discs, as those are really expensive.
Wobbly if you grab it with your hand and wiggle it, or while the wheel is off the ground and then spun by hand? I would make sure all the pistons in each caliper are clean and free moving before replacing parts. Check the cleanliness of the calipers' pistons. Un bolt them from the fork and check the underside of them. Use brake cleaner and give them a good wash. Then see if the pistons need a more detailed cleaning. Probably won't hurt to try the guys method from the video, but I've never done it so I can't comment on the bobbin aspect.
 

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I didn't realize they were supposed to be so tight. So do you guys think it's not a problem that they won't budge?
Not a problem exactly, but freeing them up you will have better feel at the lever and you should see less drag on the pads.
 
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