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Hey,

I've recently bought a 95rrs, it's got a 17" front fitted. I imagine dropping the forks through the yolks a bit is normal. Does anyone know the standard fork height through the yolks. I just want to double check what's been done. The guy I bought it from said he had dropped the forks by a mm or 2.

Thanks in advance for any help, advice or opinions.
 

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Hey,

I've recently bought a 95rrs, it's got a 17" front fitted. I imagine dropping the forks through the yolks a bit is normal. Does anyone know the standard fork height through the yolks. I just want to double check what's been done. The guy I bought it from said he had dropped the forks by a mm or 2.

Thanks in advance for any help, advice or opinions.
Depends on the tyre profile.
120/70-17 works out about 6mm taller than the OEM 130/70-16.
A 130/60-17 should be just about identical to the OEM 130/70-16.
Whether you wanted to raise or lower the forks and by how much is up to your own preference.
 

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Hey Larry,

Thanks for the info, as you correctly say I'll have to feel what I prefer interms of the height as I get used to the bike.

The tyre profile/height is useful though.

Cheers.
 

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So, can you simply drop the front of the bike, i.e. overshoot the forks over the top triple by 6 mm in order to adjust for the normal/OEM ride height?

Thanks plentifully!


Larry, do you know whether the racers go even lower on the front at the track?
 

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So, can you simply drop the front of the bike, i.e. overshoot the forks over the top triple by 6 mm in order to adjust for the normal/OEM ride height?

Thanks plentifully!


Larry, do you know whether the racers go even lower on the front at the track?

You don't need to drop the clamps as you can simply wind off some preload for the same result.
You wouldn't normally drop the front very far at all as you lose cornering clearance. It's generally better to raise the rear.
 

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You don't need to drop the clamps as you can simply wind off some preload for the same result.
You wouldn't normally drop the front very far at all as you lose cornering clearance. It's generally better to raise the rear.

Wouldn't it be the other way around?
More preload - front goes lower. (desirable when putting a larger wheel and longer diameter tire on)
Less preload - front raises.

Raise the rear: I see.
So, how do people raise the rear? Do you use a spacer under the shock? Would you have any idea how long of a spacer would you use?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Wouldn't it be the other way around?
More preload - front goes lower. (desirable when putting a larger wheel and longer diameter tire on)
Less preload - front raises.

Raise the rear: I see.
So, how do people raise the rear? Do you use a spacer under the shock? Would you have any idea how long of a spacer would you use?

Thanks in advance!
More preload raises the front of the bike, less preload lowers it.
Changing the wheel from 16" to 17" does not automatically require any suspension adjustment. The difference in height is little more than you'd experience between a new and worn out tyre.
Your bike should have a rear preload adjustment on the shock so try that first but take a measurement first to see how much it changes. Otherwise you would need to make different shock linkage plates and/or dogbone.
The amount is dependant on the positions of the shock linkages and swingarm pivot but you rarely need more than 5-10mm on the shock to lift the rear a lot.
 

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More preload raises the front of the bike, less preload lowers it.
Changing the wheel from 16" to 17" does not automatically require any suspension adjustment. The difference in height is little more than you'd experience between a new and worn out tyre.
Your bike should have a rear preload adjustment on the shock so try that first but take a measurement first to see how much it changes. Otherwise you would need to make different shock linkage plates and/or dogbone.
The amount is dependant on the positions of the shock linkages and swingarm pivot but you rarely need more than 5-10mm on the shock to lift the rear a lot.

Thank you for the speedy response.

I have my rear preload set at 30 mm in the rear and so there is plenty of space to move the rear up. I will also look into the linkage change, but that would probably be a winter mod.
 

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Thank you for the speedy response.

I have my rear preload set at 30 mm in the rear and so there is plenty of space to move the rear up. I will also look into the linkage change, but that would probably be a winter mod.

30mm where?
Do you mean sag?
The alternative is to buy or make an adjustable ride height adjuster.
 
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