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When installing a full exhaust (removal of exhaust valve) can I just unplug and remove the servo motor OR do I need to leave it in place OR is there a jumper or other trick to removing it completely?

Also, can the stealership hook an ECU to a machine of some kind and test it for proper function?

Ron
 

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I just finished installing a full Hindle exhaust on my 2001 929. I removed the PAIR system. I removed the flapper system and cable from the servo (I used a stainless bolt, washer and nylon nut to seal the hole in the airbox). I removed the HTEV cables from the servo as well. I made sure the allen nut on the servo was facing the same direction before I started the bike. After installation I didn't throw any codes or lights. The bikes runs perfect and I don't even need a pc3. Hope this helps.

Steve
 

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You can usually fool an ECU by replacing the unwanted piece (in this case, the servo motor) with a resistor. The ECU usually works by checking the resistance across the component, so you can measure the resistance across the motor and buy an equivalent resistor. I don't have any experience with a Fireblade but I have done this to several sensors on a KTM 990 and other bikes. Has anyone done this on a Blade?

Just my 2 cents... if you're like me, the thought of carrying any extra weight around is philosophically offensive, even if it has no practical impact.
 

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You can usually fool an ECU by replacing the unwanted piece (in this case, the servo motor) with a resistor. The ECU usually works by checking the resistance across the component, so you can measure the resistance across the motor and buy an equivalent resistor. I don't have any experience with a Fireblade but I have done this to several sensors on a KTM 990 and other bikes. Has anyone done this on a Blade?

Just my 2 cents... if you're like me, the thought of carrying any extra weight around is philosophically offensive, even if it has no practical impact.
I'm with you on the hating to carry around extra dead weight, but I haven't been able to find an easy way around it. The servo motor is more complicated than just a simple resistor, it has a potentiometer in it as well.

From what I understand, when you start up the bike, assuming the servo is operating correctly, the resistance from the servo is at a certain value. Then when you get above 3k rpm, the ecu sends voltage to the servo motor, rotating the "drum" on the motor while turning the rheostat. Once the correct resistance is reached, the ecu cuts voltage to the servo motor. The same thing happens again at 7k rpm.

This is just my speculation, but it seems to match how the servo works.
Pic

It is easier just to leave the servo motor in as dead weight than develop a solution, especially when the solution is beyond my electrical capabilities!
 
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