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Discussion Starter #1
something we never here of but is yet so obvious. yes, fine tuning and modding your suspension, brakes, tires etc is all well and good but ever wondered what is the best way to get the sharpest and safest handling from your sportsbike? The answer is your BODY and FLEX. you need to flex your body with the flex feedback you receive from your bike's chassis mainly through the swingarm. the trick is keep relaxed and supple enough to allow your body to lift and dip in harmony with your bike. many superbike riders simply sit too stiff and hold on to their handlebars for dear life. this flexing technique will compensate for even a poor or faulty bike. it also enhances your riding pleasure and you look and feel cool. best of all, it's free. don't overdo it though. try it for those who haven't already, the pros do.

" don't imitate, innovate"
 

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funny you mention that i use to tense up when entering a corner so much so that one of my friends mentioned it to me.Im glad that he did because it made me concentrate on be more fluid and relaxed.I ride so much better now because of that comment.The funny thing is i didnt even know this was happening.
 

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For me relaxing means elbows bent,and no weight on the grips. I have no problem relaxing and not being tense going into a corner, but almost always I think after completing the turn, I could have taken it faster.
 

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thats some great info for everyone!!

along with the relaxed posture..... i reccomend not putting to much weight over the tank, if any. Alot of guys slide their torso over, AS well as lean forward.... try to RELAX and sit in a neutral position!!

the front tire is doing enough work .... it doesn't need you putting you weight up front!! :)

my 2 cents!
 

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scooting up to far on the tank is what i was getting at there. i find in my travels on the track and on the street, many riders don't realize how far they lean up over the tank (aka puting weight on the front bias of the bike.)
if you keep your elbows still bent, but to mentally think to keep in a nice comfortable neutral position, it will increase stability, confidence, and in turn a higher corner speed.
 

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oh and if you keep that nice comfortable neutral postion in the corner, you may fnd that your torso / leg / knee will fall off to the side as you lean over to the side during cornering.

for me i find that my leg / knee ends up as a good guide while it drags on the pavement to let me know how far over iam at all times.

i hope that makes sense
 

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I am way not ready to drag a knee, but how do you know what that exact speed is where you will not have to run out into the other lane just so you don't have to lean it past the traction loss point.
 

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if you like to get some track tme....its all about starting out slow, learning the track then getting faster, and faster until you are comfortable going into each turn. slowly....and with some guidance you should be able to get good body position and lean enough that your knee will drag (keeping in mind that not everyones posture / technique requires them to drag their knee)

ON the STREET is a different story ..... i very rarely drag my knee on the street. but if you like to corner and rip it in a canyon!! then i use the SUGGESTED speed limit sign (the yellow ones) what i do is if it says 40mph (yellow sign) i usually add at least 20mph.
im from canada so its a little easier for me if i see a suggested 50 KM/H i double it!!!
 

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With good technique, how far can you push the Pirelli's on an average street surface and how does that compare to the track?
I got into some damp pavement on a corner and lost the back end. I stayed on the gas and pulled it out, but I'm not anxious to test it again!!!
 

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i think we all know our limits right?? (the little voice in your head saying your getting in over your head here!!)
so what i try to do is
1. track - i go about 95% of that LIMIT i have for myself. there is lots of safety at the track. and EVERYONE is going the same direction. and the road is smooth, and consistant.
2. street - i go about MAX. 80% of that limit. cars, sand on the road, decreasing radius corners...... if you allow that little cushion then hopefully you can do something when things go astray. keeping in mind that when i ride aggressively on the street i always shift my weight to the appropriate side in EVERY corner.... then its there when you need it.

i hope im making sense too you??
its hard to explain alot without showing
 

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i think we all know our limits right?? (the little voice in your head saying your getting in over your head here!!)
so what i try to do is
1. track - i go about 95% of that LIMIT i have for myself. there is lots of safety at the track. and EVERYONE is going the same direction. and the road is smooth, and consistant.
2. street - i go about MAX. 80% of that limit. cars, sand on the road, decreasing radius corners...... if you allow that little cushion then hopefully you can do something when things go astray. keeping in mind that when i ride aggressively on the street i always shift my weight to the appropriate side in EVERY corner.... then its there when you need it.

i hope im making sense too you??
its hard to explain alot without showing
Makes sense... Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #13
in reply to bladezilla's question and to many others as to when to drag your knee, it's key to remember that each individual has his own unique riding style. putting your knee down should be almost an automatic reflex i.e. a natural extension of your knee) as fluidly as possible. kneedown's are used mainly for extra lean, a lower centre of gravity and using the fatter part of your tyre so as to make tight cornering safer and more stable. be warned though, do not do it for show or to look cool especially at high speed - bike can become dangerously unstable.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
in reply to bladezilla's question and to many others as to when to drag your knee, it's key to remember that each individual has his own unique riding style. putting your knee down should be almost an automatic reflex i.e. a natural extension of your knee) as fluidly as possible. kneedown's are used mainly for extra lean, a lower centre of gravity and using the fatter part of your tyre so as to make tight cornering safer and more stable. be warned though, do not do it for show or to look cool especially at high speed - bike can become dangerously unstable.
'the first shall come last and the last shall come first"
 

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Discussion Starter #15
in reply to bladezilla's question and to many others as to when to drag your knee, it's key to remember that each individual has his own unique riding style. putting your knee down should be almost an automatic reflex i.e. a natural extension of your knee) as fluidly as possible. kneedown's are used mainly for extra lean, a lower centre of gravity and using the fatter part of your tyre so as to make tight cornering safer and more stable. be warned though, do not do it for show or to look cool especially at high speed - bike can become dangerously unstable.
'the first shall come last and the last shall come first":D
 

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Discussion Starter #20
in response to ninja 95, those are some really cool tips. i would suggest that one employs the knee down only for really sharp and tight bends or corners, otherwise on the long sweeps and wide gradual bends, you can floor the throttle without the need for knee downs. this makes you go faster for sure especially on track. on the road the same applies, though a word of caution, roads are normally built with negative and positive camber. negative camber is awesome to do some kneedowns since your bike pushes against the left side of the road esp. in right handers. positive camber is plain dangerous and your front tire can easily wash out since the road slopes away from you and the tires do not have enough bite as a result. most tracks are neutral. roads are built this way so that rain and other spills flow away.:rotfl:
 
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