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What is wrong help? Just recently if I wind my throttle it bogs out then slowly speeds up. I run 94 octane through it. It sounds and feels like it isn't getting any gas. Help?
 

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What is wrong help? Just recently if I wind my throttle it bogs out then slowly speeds up. I run 94 octane through it. It sounds and feels like it isn't getting any gas. Help?

Would I be right if I guessed you are doing this at low rpm?
If so, don't. The engine is not designed to pull throttle from low rpm - get the revs up and keep them there.
 

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This motorcycle is designed to go fast and get there fast. It never did this before. I'm talking about twisting half throttle then it bogs out then picks back up. I know it shouldn't do that. It does it through the gears. Maybe my injectors? Can I put treatment in my tank? But what else could it be? Aswell as the most likely
 

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In that case I would be checking the fuel pressure regulator.
 

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This motorcycle is designed to go fast and get there fast. It never did this before. I'm talking about twisting half throttle then it bogs out then picks back up. I know it shouldn't do that. It does it through the gears. Maybe my injectors? Can I put treatment in my tank? But what else could it be? Aswell as the most likely

Sure it is, but not a low rpm.
Even at 10,000rpm when cruising, if you crack the throttle open the engine stumbles?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sure it is, but not a low rpm.
Even at 10,000rpm when cruising, if you crack the throttle open the engine stumbles?
No but it doesn't giddy up fast enough. I don't cruise at 10 grand unless I'm going a little to fast. I shift a 6 grand.

Either way. I should be able to crack my throttle at 2 grand in 1st and I should get going. But if I do that it'll bog out and lose speed before it slowly picks up. Same with second and third. Once I get to a good speed it doesn't bog. But doesn't speed up fast as it should
 

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No but it doesn't giddy up fast enough. I don't cruise at 10 grand unless I'm going a little to fast. I shift a 6 grand.

Either way. I should be able to crack my throttle at 2 grand in 1st and I should get going. But if I do that it'll bog out and lose speed before it slowly picks up. Same with second and third. Once I get to a good speed it doesn't bog. But doesn't speed up fast as it should


No you should not be able to crack the throttle at 2000rpm and expect the engine to pull hard.
You can wind in the throttle slowly and give it more as the revs build but a handful of throttle at low rpm just floods the engine with fuel it can't burn, fouling the plugs and increasing the risk of detonation.
 

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I agree but it didn't used t do this. Just started. I can't even go from 0 to 45 in 4 seconds. Its like it isn't getting fuel. If I'm in 3rd and I crack throttle same thing..
 

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I agree but it didn't used t do this. Just started. I can't even go from 0 to 45 in 4 seconds. Its like it isn't getting fuel. If I'm in 3rd and I crack throttle same thing..

It doesn't matter what gear you're in, it only matters what the rpm is.
You cannot crack the throttle open at 5mph for example and expect it to accelerate, you have to pull the clutch to get the revs up first.
Check the FPR as they do fail and it's a very simple check.
 

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Are the expensive? How do I check it? I understand where y thats the thing.ou are coming from. It just started doing it
 

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Are the expensive? How do I check it? I understand where y thats the thing.ou are coming from. It just started doing it

Pull the vacuum line off, turn the ignition on to prime the fuel pump, make sure no fuel comes out of the FPR - if it does you need a new one. From memory I think they're around $75.
I thought only bought the bike recently?
 

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You have the wrong octane in there. Octane rates define the burn temp. Higher octane= more additives to prevent a fast response. The cbr is rated for 91 highest! 94 means you are slowing your ignition firing. Unless you modifed the engine for higher compression, you are pouring crud in the gas. Try 91 and move down to 89 or 87 until the engine knocks. That means you are too low and the gas is preigniting. Have octane boost to get you back to the no knocks. If you want a good ignition with lowest octane, try water wetter to keep the hot spots in the engine to a minimum.
 

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You have the wrong octane in there. Octane rates define the burn temp. Higher octane= more additives to prevent a fast response. The cbr is rated for 91 highest! 94 means you are slowing your ignition firing. Unless you modifed the engine for higher compression, you are pouring crud in the gas. Try 91 and move down to 89 or 87 until the engine knocks. That means you are too low and the gas is preigniting. Have octane boost to get you back to the no knocks. If you want a good ignition with lowest octane, try water wetter to keep the hot spots in the engine to a minimum.

Say what?
Higher octane may not provide any benefit but it's not "slowing your ignition firing" or "pooring crud in the gas".
I've never seen WaterWetter make any measureable difference in engine temperature.
 

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High octane for most people, even trackday people, is a marketing angle. Here's how it's explained to me:
-The higher the octane, the higher the fuel mix preignition temp.
-Heat from spark PLUS compression make the fuel mix ignite
-If the engine is PREIGNITING, that's called the knocks. That means the pistons, cams yada,yada are not firing at the correct timing
-The knocks causes engine damage, which is why a lot of older cars would ask for premium, especially as they got older because the engine fabrication was not great and there were hot spots in the engine and cooling system.
-Modern cars,race cars that ask for high octane because they have a higher compression and thus need the octane to PREVENT the knocks or fuel preignition
-Race cars have insane compression and need 94 octane and up to prevent the fuel mixture from igniting too early
-Any stock car or bike will ask for an octane of 87-91.
-contrary to popular belief, OCTANE is "dirtier" fuel. It has additives that make the fuel less pure and thus it ignites "later"
-If your bike or car asks for it, it's because of compression ratio. It's not because it's high end gas.

One way to allow your bike to run on a lower octane fuel is to make the engine cool faster, and as such allow less hotspots and as such not "knock."
-Water is the best coolant available. What most people put in their radiators is "antifreeze/coolant." That's a viscous,glychol fluid which prevents freezing in the cooling system but is not as good as H20 for heat transfer.
-Putting water in the cooling system is best, but you need an additive to prevent "foaming", boiling and airpockets. Hence Water wetter. It's the best heat transfer coolant around
-Water wetter prevents air pockets, which screw up cavitation, which in turn makes part of the engine have air pockets and hot spots which in turn adds to the KNOCKS issue. See above.

So, as was explained to me, efficient cooling of the engine allows for the lowest octane/highest compression ratio possible. YOU WANT LOW OCTANE for responsive throttle power as long as the fuel doesn't explode on the downswing.
 

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High octane for most people, even trackday people, is a marketing angle. Here's how it's explained to me:
-The higher the octane, the higher the fuel mix preignition temp.
-Heat from spark PLUS compression make the fuel mix ignite
-If the engine is PREIGNITING, that's called the knocks. That means the pistons, cams yada,yada are not firing at the correct timing
-The knocks causes engine damage, which is why a lot of older cars would ask for premium, especially as they got older because the engine fabrication was not great and there were hot spots in the engine and cooling system.
-Modern cars,race cars that ask for high octane because they have a higher compression and thus need the octane to PREVENT the knocks or fuel preignition
-Race cars have insane compression and need 94 octane and up to prevent the fuel mixture from igniting too early
-Any stock car or bike will ask for an octane of 87-91.
-contrary to popular belief, OCTANE is "dirtier" fuel. It has additives that make the fuel less pure and thus it ignites "later"
-If your bike or car asks for it, it's because of compression ratio. It's not because it's high end gas.

One way to allow your bike to run on a lower octane fuel is to make the engine cool faster, and as such allow less hotspots and as such not "knock."
-Water is the best coolant available. What most people put in their radiators is "antifreeze/coolant." That's a viscous,glychol fluid which prevents freezing in the cooling system but is not as good as H20 for heat transfer.
-Putting water in the cooling system is best, but you need an additive to prevent "foaming", boiling and airpockets. Hence Water wetter. It's the best heat transfer coolant around
-Water wetter prevents air pockets, which screw up cavitation, which in turn makes part of the engine have air pockets and hot spots which in turn adds to the KNOCKS issue. See above.

So, as was explained to me, efficient cooling of the engine allows for the lowest octane/highest compression ratio possible. YOU WANT LOW OCTANE for responsive throttle power as long as the fuel doesn't explode on the downswing.

Running higher-octane fuel is not going to do any harm to your engine though.
Outside of the US, higher octane fuels also contain a better cocktail of additives that give you other benefits, like better mileage and cleaner combustion.
 

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Here's a link to water wetter explanation. I know it rocks most peoples' worlds to have something more expensive being less quality but premium fuel is basically formulated to help older cars,race cars or sports cars with high compression and a need for a slower ignition time.

WaterWetter® Tech Info

I put water wetter in my CBR600f4i for the usual commute stuff, and I can get my octane down to 87. it doesn't care about octane-unless "maybe" you are doing track days in Arizona with the engine running at 220 degrees constantly.
 

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Here's a link to water wetter explanation. I know it rocks most peoples' worlds to have something more expensive being less quality but premium fuel is basically formulated to help older cars,race cars or sports cars with high compression and a need for a slower ignition time.

WaterWetter® Tech Info

I put water wetter in my CBR600f4i for the usual commute stuff, and I can get my octane down to 87. it doesn't care about octane-unless "maybe" you are doing track days in Arizona with the engine running at 220 degrees constantly.
I have used WW, as I said, it does nothing, complete waste of money.
Why do you want to run the lowest possible octane though? Run whatever octane is specified for your engine, there is nothing to gain by trying to go lower.
 

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You will get lower "performance" from high octane if your engine requires 87-89. The ignition timing will be slower. Think of a gas engine and diesel. The gas engine is more responsive, the fuel burns faster. Diesel is cheaper, much higher octane igniting temp and requires a ton of compression to get it to "burn." The mileage improvements, if even noticeable, is not worth the cost.
And the original question regarded a boggy throttle. And if I could guess, it's because he's using an octane that is way beyond the engine rating and slower response. You are doing no favors to the engine by pouring in 94,97 octanes in a stock bike(87-91 octane) which is designed specifically for average daily use and a track day once a month.
If all other specs are kept equal, an engine with a higher compression ratio will have greater horsepower. However, you need an engine that is operating with the higher compression ratio. If you have an engine compressing for an 87 octane fuel and you put in 91, nothing changes except you’re a little bit poorer.
 
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