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After looking at some other designs I saw on the web at this link I came up with this design for a bead breaker which is the most difficult part of changing a tire if you don't have one. With this it's the easiest part.

The bead braker was made up of 1x3 wood and two peices were screwed together to make the ram and lever part. I added .065' steel plates at the pivot and to attach the ram. I learned the hard way that you need that plate on the pivot for strength. I also added a piece of 1/8' aluminum plate to the ram which is bent to the shape of the wheel because it slid off the tire with just the piece of wood. I made two rams, one of which is 2' longer for front tires. The bolts are 3/4'. It's attached to the wall with 2 1/2' drywall screws into 2 studs.

The tire mount is a 15' wheel that I cut in half with a sawzall and added rubber automotive vacuum hose to both sides that I slit down the middle. This makes it fit perfect to the wheels. I used 14' 5/8 bolt to hold the wheel to the bench.

First I break the bead on both sides of the tire then start with the tire irons. I have 3 irons that that cost about $26 for the lot. You also need rim protectors. So far I just cut up a 2 litre bottle and used that to success but I think I'm going to try somthing thicker next time like a 409 bottle.

It's much more difficult to put on the new tire then it is to get the old one off. When installing the new tire, the first side goes on easy if you soap up the bead good you can install it with out tools. Just keep pushing it around. Now is the time to line up the dot on the tire(the lightest part of the tire) to the valve stem(the heavyest part of the wheel). Next start working the tire onto the wheel and hold one side with a tire iron and I found it easiest to hold the other with the ram of the bead breaker. Make sure to keep the tire pushed into the middle of the wheel. It makes the rest go on much smoother. keep working the tire around a little at a time. Too much at once and you can dammage the tire. Make sure it's soaped up too. Once it's on, air it up and seat the bead. It pops loud when it seats. Might want to wear some safty goggles while doing this as soap will come flying out. Reinstall your schrader valve and set the pressure.

For ballancing I made a steel rod fit two old bearings out of my rollerblades and set it on two jack stands. I add weight at the top of the wheel until it will stay in any position I put it in. I've never had a ballance issue doing it this way.

I hope this might help anyone who might want to take on the task themself and save some bucks. I've change out two tires now on it and it only took about 20 minutes a tire.

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Nice work OTE!
I have a friend with a similar rig (not quite as fancy as yours) and it works great....
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I used to have a tire changer at work but we ran out of room and had to get rid of it so I was spoiled. It's nice to be able to do something yourself and not worry about the local shops being closed Saturday night when you have a ride on Sunday.
 

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well... ever since, say, about last november, i've done about 5-6 bikes, and havent balanced any of them, including my own... and havent seen/heard an issue with balancing... 90% of the time, its the rim thats out of balance anyway, you line the dot on the new tire with the valve stem, and most of the time, it takes very little, if any extra weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I looked into that system. The only part you get in that picture for $39.99 is the adaptor. You also have to buy the main section which is $69.99 and a extra tire iron $9.99 and you still don't get a bead breaker which is the biggest issue. I was thinking of getting a hydraulic press (6 ton $69.99) for the bead breaker but both those things together take up valuable floor space which I don't have in my garage.

Edit: I forgot the $69.99 press isn't wide enough to fit a tire into you would need at least the $129 press to be wide enough to slide it in far enough to the ram. For a total price of $250 + tax.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
sportbiker929 : Hey,
The bead breaker ison the bottom of the 69.99 part. You insert the long tire lever in to be the handle. I think it would work pretty well.
MItch
Yeah, I think your right about that being a bead breaker. That would make it much more reasonable.
 

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954spider : Some people just hate to give others a compliment!!! Its called pride in doing it your self!!!!!
Hey, I should have said it looks like a fine piece of art. Way to much effort for me, with 2 chitlin's running around. It is a nice job, just thought I would point out something I stumbled across.
Mitch
 

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that shits tight on edge, i apreciate that alot, thanks, im building one this week, fuuck paying the shop
 

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Figures, a couple of weeks after I fight new rubber on the YSR race bike, someone local has a bead braker! A least the YSR tires are narrow enough to fit in a 6 inch vice to break them loose.

mike
 

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Nice bead breaker .My friend and I swap out the tires all the time for the track .all we use is a big vice to pop the bead ,works great ,a little difficult if by yourself but no real problem ,Can do both bikes about and hour and a half .
Ed
 

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OntheEdge : Quote (sportbiker929 @ July 05 2003, 4:55am)cheap tire changer
I looked into that system. The only part you get in that picture for $39.99 is the adaptor. You also have to buy the main section which is $69.99 and a extra tire iron $9.99 and you still don't get a bead breaker which is the biggest issue. I was thinking of getting a hydraulic press (6 ton $69.99) for the bead breaker but both those things together take up valuable floor space which I don't have in my garage.

Edit: I forgot the $69.99 press isn't wide enough to fit a tire into you would need at least the $129 press to be wide enough to slide it in far enough to the ram. For a total price of $250 + tax.
This is my first post here so go easy. I have the harbor Freight tire changer. I bought it at the Semi Valley store for $29.95. The motorcycle piece was only $19.95. Best money I have ever spent. If you buy this, I have some suggestions. Rubber coat the clamps where they grip the rim. Use lots of soapy solution for removal and installation. Have 3 old fashioned tire irons handy as they scratch things much less than the big bar that comes with the changer.  It does come with a bead breaker that works great.
 
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