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Discussion Starter #21

3rd gear can now slide off

Third gear also has a collar that it rests on

Then another washer comes off

Then you have to remove another snap ring with your tool.

Then 2nd gear can come off the output drive shaft in the 954/929 transmission.

Then another snap ring... you will notice that snap rings are on either side of the gear sprockets that move side to side on the drive shafts via the shift forks that engage the gears.



1st gear has a collar that it rests on too.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
And there is the whole CBR 954 output shaft disassembled and laid out in order from left to right:


Here's a new CBR 954 first gear compared to the used 1st gear. You can save 30% by buying from discounthondaparts.com... rarely will you find a good used first gear for sale on sites like ebay... actually, rarely will you find individual gears for sale on those sites.

Here's 954 6th gear compared the the sixth gear on 929 transmission that was purchased on ebay they are interchangable

However the rest of the gears on the output shaft are not interchangable 954 to 929. Thats because (for whatever reason) the 954 gears have four dogs and the 929 has five dogs.

Here are the two laid out side by side (the washers and other hardware is interchangable and the same).
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Now you can remove all the gears from the input drive shaft in the CBR 929/954 transmission in the same organized way you did the output shaft.
This input drive shaft has the clutch attached to it and the clutch transmits cranking power from the crank shaft to the input shaft which in turn transmits power to the output shaft through the specified gear ratios in the transmission which makes your rear tire move. Most motorcycle transmissions, especially inline four (I-4) sport bikes, have sequential transmissions like this. Kawasaki 14r, 12r, 10r, 9r, 6r, 636; Yamaha R1 and R6; Suzuki GSXR 1300, 1000, 750, and 600; and Honda CBR 1000rr, 954rr, 929rr, 900rr, 600rr even the interceptor VFRs, Rc51... you get the point:)


The CBR 954 and 929 input shaft and gears are the same


 

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Discussion Starter #24
Now we get to the fun stuff: how to salvage a worn transmission gear with a dremel... A motorcycle mechanic friend shared this tip with me.





From the pics you can see all that is done to save a gear is grinding down the left inside edge of the gear face where the dog engages. Make sure you grind the area even/level/flat... it can't slope down and out... if anything sloping it in barely is okay. People pay to have this precision machine work done. It's called undercut gears, usually a 2% grade slope into the base of the gear sprocket that promotes holding the gear engaged.... even though the shift fork is primarily responsible for holding a gear in place. However, don't attempt to undercut your gears yourself.
With all this work you are simply recreating the flat crisp edge for the engaged gear's dogs to rest on as the cranking power is transmitted throught the mated gears. The rounding happens if the rider mis-shifts hard and often enough that it damages the gear. It can be from poor timing of the shifts, not shifting hard enough, worn or bent shift forks, or other bad shifting habits.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Re-assembly of the transmission gears back on to the drive shafts is simply the reverse order of taking them off, snap rings and all. You can use the pictures and discriptions in this thread and trace the steps backward. Be careful when using manuals my Haynes manual I have has a mistake. It tells you to put sixth gear on the input shaft on backward with the slope of the gear facing out... that is wrong. Sometimes your best reference is your own pictures you take of your transmission before you begin the disassembly.

Here's the output shaft re-assembled

Make sure to place each shaft's cap properly into the stud... otherwise the case halves won't close together.


Also note the three alignment studs in the case halves before re-joining the cases. And here are the places to put the molybdenium disulfide grease too.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
If you haven't already, put the shift drum, forks, and dedent arm with spring in.

The shift forks go in like so with the "R" fork nearest the clutch/ right side of the engine, "C" is in the center, and "L" is on the stator/left side of the engine.




If you took the shift star off the drum, this is the order of the parts.

The star back fits into the drum's pin like so

Don't forget medim strength thread lock


You can torque the shift drum bolt down to 15 Nm with it held lightly in a vice with a rod through it to prevent it from turning.

The drum installs here in the lower case half.


The drum/shift fork shaft retainer bolts also need medium strength thread lock (as do all the bolts you're re-installing) and can be torqued down to 12 Nm
 

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Discussion Starter #27

The shift arm can be torqued down to 12Nm


If needed you can lift the arm up onto the shift star with a screw driver

And there it is

The shift mechanism slides right in and positions over the shift star to select gears.

You can put the lower case half on dry, put a bolt in each corner and try shifting through the gears to make sure you installed everything right.
 

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Discussion Starter #28



It looks more difficult than it is because the shift fork pins only fit into the drum one way... as for the shift forks: the R and L fit back into the output shaft and the Center fork fits forward into the input shaft.

With the cases temporarily dry fitted together with a few bolts you can dry shift through the gears by clicking the shift fork counter clockwise (if you are looking at the shift star with the shift mechanism removed). Then shift back down to neutral by turning the drum the other way... it'll be difficult to turn it by hand, so you can use a big screw driver to help coax the drum.

Bikes shift best if the engine is running and the bike is moving so don't be discouraged if it's not shifting fast and crisp up and down.
 

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Discussion Starter #29

Now you can use some alcohol or brake/parts cleaner to clean the mating surfaces of the upper and lower case halves and case covers where RTV gasket goes.



And double check to make sure the oil passages are clean

Here's where the RTV gasket gets put down before you put the case halves together.

Here the half ring washer is missing from the chanel, but also note worthy is just to the right there is another alignment pin to be sure is placed corectly... if not, the crank case halves won't close together and seal.
 

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Discussion Starter #30

After you make sure the trans shafts are settled into their dowel pins and set pin, the swing arm pivot collars are in place, the 3 case halves dowels are present, and you also have the RTV down, you can place the lower case half down...


have a second person guiding the shift forks into their position in the trans while you lower the case down... if not you'll have to simply remove the shift fork shaft, and put each shift fork into it's spot and re-install the shift fork shaft.


You can now start bolting the lower crank case half down...

the manuals aren't very clear on the torque specs... they don't mention that the front crank case bolts are only 6mm in the front of the chapter for the torque specs, leading you to believe these small bolts are 8mm which say to use 24Nm of torque... which equates to 18ft lbs of torque... that is over double what you are actually supposed to use and all the 6mm bolts broke with that ammount of torque.
So after a trip to Menards (who actually had the identical bolts in stock) and looking over the manual for what went wrong we found in the very front of the honda manual it says to use only 10Nm of torque on 6mm bolts.... we also used medium strength thread lock (which we used on all the bolts). It would have been nice if both Haynes and Honda would have clarified this in the begining of their chapters instead of assuming you know all this.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Here's where all the bolts you will be returning into the lower crank case half. There are 10, 9, 8, and 6mm bolts. Which, after breaking a half dozen of the 6mm bolts using the full 24Nm of torque only to find out later in the very front of the honda service manual it says to use only 10-12Nm of torque on 6mm bolts... The 10mm bolt call for 39Nm of torque and the 9mm stretch bolts call for 35Nm of torque (more on that later) and the 8mm bolts on the rear of the crank cases and some on the top of the crank case call for 24Nm of torque




Here's where you'll be putting in the 10 new stretch bolts. People say you can re-use them, however, with bolts that stablize your crank shaft I don't want to mess around. It's well worth the $50 or so to get the new bolts.


Of the Ten 9mm bolts there are three different sizes. There are x5 88mm, x1 93mm, and x4 108mm.
It's confusing because the different manuals out there differ in what torque specs to put down. The honda pdf manual I saw says 35Nm of torque and the Haynes Manual says 20Nm of torque plus 150 degree rotation...


So I did the 20Nm +150 with the new bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter #32

The oil cooler bolt is 74Nm of torque with the 30mm socket

The two 6mm water pump bolts are 10Nm of torque...

Make sure the water pump's drive shaft is locked in with drive shaft coming out of the back of the oil pump

Put the oil diffuser back on.

The previous owner of the bike put way to much RTV on the case covers and the pieces came off and ended up in the oil pick up screen so you can clean that out by spraying parts cleaner down the other side.

Then you can put the oil pick up back on

Put the RTV down for oil pan if everything looks good.... You can double check that it's still shifting good and you can even turn the engine over with the 14mm bolt on the timing rotor on the clutch side to double check the engine is smoothly turning... make sure your spark plugs are out... just to make it easier.

All the oil pan bolts are the same so you can put them in and torque them down to 10Nm.
 

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Discussion Starter #33

There is one alignment dowel on the stator cover side, so make sure that is in there.

Return the sprocket and dowel it spins on if you removed it.


Put the RTV gasket maker down on the case cover.

When you put the stator cover back on be careful to not mess up the RTV because the magnetic force of the stator pulls it.

The bolts here are also the 10Nm... basically common sense snuging them down works good too;)
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Then for the clutch side of the engine:


First re-install the plate, the three bolts get 12Nm of torque

Then you can slide the drive collar, chain, and oil pump sprocket on

You can torque down the oil pump sprocket to 15Nm by putting a screw driver through one of the holes like this

The next step is putting on the clutch but in order to slide it on the two sprockets on the crank have to be aligned...

First you must locate this hole in order to put a screw driver or some rod through to stabalize and prevent the engine from just turning over.


The Haynes manual I have mistakenly tells you to turn the 14mm nut clockwise to align the sprockets... I found this wasn't true, you actually turn it counter clockwise... it doesn't take a whole lot of pressure and this bolt is held in with 90Nm of torque so it isn't going to unbolt for the little pressure it takes to align.



Make sure the holes in the clutch accept the nubs on the oil drive collar... otherwise it won't set all the way back and the oil and water pump won't turn.

You can see here that these parts are not aligned... simply reach in and turn the oil pump sprocket while lightly pushing on the clutch housing until they lock into place.

The sprockets should be flush.
 

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Discussion Starter #35

Next you can put the large washer on the shaft.

Here I'm holding the washer in my left hand


Then you can put the clutch basket in... we installed a new one

Then install the first washer

Then another washer that is slightly smaller, out side facing out.

Then a new clutch center nut... you can re-use yours too... don't forget to re-stake it into the grove of shaft after you torque it down to 127Nm of torque.

It's a 30mm nut like the oil cooler bolt.



My home made clutch center holder.

 

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Discussion Starter #36

Next you can open up the zip lock bag with your zip tied together clutch plates


The Judder spring seat is what you insert first, followed by the Judder spring it's a concave shape

Then you put in the first fiber disk... it's called the "Large inner diameter disk"
Then it's just a matter of putting the steel plates and fiber plates in one by one alternating.



The last disk with the green edge goes into the clutch basket like this off set from the others

 

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Discussion Starter #37

Next you can put in the clutch lifter and the bearing

here they are installed

Then you can put the lifter plate on

Then you can put your clutch springs in... new ones are only about $10 on ebay so it's not a bad investment. I prefer 10-20% stiffer clutch springs because of the better feedback I feel from the lever.
 

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Discussion Starter #38

The clutch bolts need medium strength thread lock... don't forget the washers that go along to.

It goes without saying to torque any part with multiple bolts in a alternating pattern one across from the other one by one.

These clutch bolts only need 12Nm of torque

Don't forget to re-bolt the cam chain tensioner guide bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter #39

It's another bolt that only needs 12Nm of torque

As long as the old gasket is cleaned off you're ready to put the clutch cover back on.

Lay the RTV gasket down, like the stator cover I put it under and over the wire coming out of the case. When you put the cover on there are two alignment dowels to watch as you are putting the cover on...

As well as making sure the clutch pull rod is insetered in the case and turned like this so it can properly hook on to the clutch lifter rod.

The clutch cover bolts are also 12Nm of torque and to use lock tight (like all the bolts)
Once the cover is on and you feel the need to test out the clutch... don't be surprised if you can't turn the clutch pull rod by hand... If you use a pipe about a foot long or so then you can easily enough test it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
At this point (if you haven't already) you can flip the engine upright again.




There are the crank case bolts you need to return. They are varrying different sizes, however it is not too difficult to locate their spots because they will either a) stick out to far or too little when dropped in OR b) they will be too big or small to thread into the bolt hole.

The big 10mm bolt is 39Nm of torque
The 8mm bolts are 24Nm of torque
and the one 6mm bolt is 12Nm of torque
 
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