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Discussion Starter #1
As the title implies. I want to start dicing it out again, even if it's for last place :idunno:. Back in the mid to late 70's there was "Box Stock" one of my favorites for a privateer. You could ride your bike to and from the track and have a blast while you're there. I'll be trailering it to the track these days so I can take the Mrs. but have know idea what class. I've always thought the SGV 650 (I'm not even sure that's the right designation but you know what I mean) could be a fun bike, mid size, plenty of aftermarket? I have access to Luguna, Thunder Hill and of course Sears Point but have been out of it so long raising a family to be honest I'm lost. Possibly a vintage is a better idea? Help me out here. I need a class that is run year round, as inexpensive as practical, and the most important "I want to have fun" and having 2 bikes to support this venture is reasonable.
Any input would be appreciated
 

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I hear Laguna is a strict track for motorcycles. I've ridden shotgun in my friends Shelby there and at Sears Point. I think I would get more track under my belt before shelling out the big dollars for that track. I actually have only ridden one track, Thunderhill. It seems like it's the cheapest for track days. I don't know about classes, I need to take some myself.
Have you looked into Buttonwillow? I think it's the closer to you than Thunderhill. Dave Moss goes there all the time.
Not much help here, I just kinda got excited when you mentioned tracks that are right in my backyard.
:smilebig:

 

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As the title implies. I want to start dicing it out again, even if it's for last place :idunno:. Back in the mid to late 70's there was "Box Stock" one of my favorites for a privateer. You could ride your bike to and from the track and have a blast while you're there. I'll be trailering it to the track these days so I can take the Mrs. but have know idea what class. I've always thought the SGV 650 (I'm not even sure that's the right designation but you know what I mean) could be a fun bike, mid size, plenty of aftermarket? I have access to Luguna, Thunder Hill and of course Sears Point but have been out of it so long raising a family to be honest I'm lost. Possibly a vintage is a better idea? Help me out here. I need a class that is run year round, as inexpensive as practical, and the most important "I want to have fun" and having 2 bikes to support this venture is reasonable.
Any input would be appreciated

When I started racing I used to ride to the track, remove the road gear, race all day, then ride home again. I started racing Production Superbike and basically everything had to be stock - including the muffler.
Production racing sounds good, until you crash and have to replace all the damage with OEM parts. I remember Mike Dowson and Kevin McGee on the FZ750 used to seriously grind away the mufflers on both sides in practice and had to replace them at the start of every race - with OEM items - due to the ground clearance advantage it gave them. That can get expensive very quickly :)

I can't guess what classes are being run where you are so I can only suggest you get along to the circuits and talk to the guys there, and see which classes have the most appeal in the flesh. I've always been a fairly big bloke so I missed out on the 250 Production Classes which were absolutely amazing in the late eighties and the nineties. I've read of EX250 racing in the US which would be bloody good fun and probably the cheapest possible option (there's been recent discussion of trying to bring 250 Proddie racing back with the EX250's down here). Or the GS500/EX500 class I've seen there as well? Once you look at the Supersport/Superbike classes the costs immediately mount up just from the cost of tyres, and Supersport having to replace damaged wheels, forks, subframes, etc with OEM parts. Superbike generally allows a lot of modification so you can build the bike however you want it.
 

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I've often thought of getting back on the track, I miss throwing my RS125 around and going up the inside of 600's.

About 10 years ago there used to be a national SV650 Cup up here in Canada, a spec class for amateurs only. If I were to race, I'd think an SV would be the way to go. Lightweight, decent power, good on tires and there is a million of them out there with good aftermarket support.

Not sure what classes there are in the various race sanctioning bodies, but you could probably run an SV in more than one class.

If not an SV, then something similar, like a Ninja 650 or Ducati 750SS
 

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I would suggest looking up each track's website to get some information on what they run. My cousin races CMRA, though I'm not sure what all is required aside from a race license (obviously). I found out that, despite the extreme appeal, Barber (Birmingham, AL), will likely not be in my future just because of the strict prep and tech inspection. Of course, if you fail tech you aren't allowed on the track nor entitled to a refund... but, a little research showed me this loooong before I invested any time or money to head there =)
 

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Try to get in touch with a local racing club or racing school, or go to a local track day most of the instructors are amateur racers and can provide a lot of info. Here in NH we have the Loudon Road Racing Series which organizes events and Penguin Racing School to obtain CCS/ASRA license.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I've often thought of getting back on the track, I miss throwing my RS125 around and going up the inside of 600's.

About 10 years ago there used to be a national SV650 Cup up here in Canada, a spec class for amateurs only. If I were to race, I'd think an SV would be the way to go. Lightweight, decent power, good on tires and there is a million of them out there with good aftermarket support.

Not sure what classes there are in the various race sanctioning bodies, but you could probably run an SV in more than one class.

If not an SV, then something similar, like a Ninja 650 or Ducati 750SS
The aftermarket support of the SV650 is what interest me, but that has been some years back. Easy on tires, that will be a change. The Kawi that BladeRacer suggested is my other choice but I believe it will all come down to what the local tracks support.
Thanks for the input, Bob

That Ohlins you're looking for will make a unbelievable difference. what do you have in mind for the front?
 

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The aftermarket support of the SV650 is what interest me, but that has been some years back. Easy on tires, that will be a change. The Kawi that BladeRacer suggested is my other choice but I believe it will all come down to what the local tracks support.
Thanks for the input, Bob

That Ohlins you're looking for will make a unbelievable difference. what do you have in mind for the front?
Ohlins springs and the Ohlins 20mm FPK.

New Ohlins shocks are impossible to find, so I'm trying to find a good used unit. If I can't find one by the Spring, then my second choice is a Penske 8983.

As for the SV, I'd think everything you'd need to track one is still available. The tires thing was one of the reasons I choose a Honda RS125 for the track; a set of slicks would last a long time because it was so light and didn't make a whole lot of power.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So as some of you may know I was in a mishap several years back and ended up losing my shop due to poor management/cash flow while I was recuperating. I recently went to work for another machine shop and mentioned my son races and the topic immediately changed to getting our own bikes out on the track. He has a Hayabusa and of course I have the 929 so I thought we would do some drag runs for the fun of it and he wants to put down the cash for Gixxer and do a little road racing, YEA!. I hear the 600's are a little wicked for a newcomer as they come on hard. The liter bike might be a handful as well but I'm thinking the 750 puts out about the same horse as my bike so it might be a good match. I just don't know which year to recommend. I think he should buy something reasonable so if it goes down there is no heartache. If the plastics get hammered he can just replace with something from China. But what year if he goes the 750 route? I would think he wants the F.I. and is the 750 motor safe in it's frame for most "track mishaps?" I'm going to stick with my choice of getting a pumped up SV650 and hope I can hang with him. Is that practical reasoning or will he just run away from me?
Thanks, Bob
 

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So as some of you may know I was in a mishap several years back and ended up losing my shop due to poor management/cash flow while I was recuperating. I recently went to work for another machine shop and mentioned my son races and the topic immediately changed to getting our own bikes out on the track. He has a Hayabusa and of course I have the 929 so I thought we would do some drag runs for the fun of it and he wants to put down the cash for Gixxer and do a little road racing, YEA!. I hear the 600's are a little wicked for a newcomer as they come on hard. The liter bike might be a handful as well but I'm thinking the 750 puts out about the same horse as my bike so it might be a good match. I just don't know which year to recommend. I think he should buy something reasonable so if it goes down there is no heartache. If the plastics get hammered he can just replace with something from China. But what year if he goes the 750 route? I would think he wants the F.I. and is the 750 motor safe in it's frame for most "track mishaps?" I'm going to stick with my choice of getting a pumped up SV650 and hope I can hang with him. Is that practical reasoning or will he just run away from me?
Thanks, Bob
Power-wise, you'll get destroyed. The depending on the year, the SV is close in weight to a Gixxer 750, so you won't have a weight advantage to help in the corners. You could probably get on the gas sooner as the SV is less powerful, but I'd think that would be about the only edge, and then he'd just come by shortly after. Even a modded SV can only do so much to close the gap.

Can't speak to their crash resistance, but '98 and up Gixxer 750's have FI, as far as that goes.

(FWIW, the '01 Gixxer 750 was my all time favorite bike to ride. More midrange 'easyness' than a 600, more 'accessible' than a 1000. For the life of me I don't know why the 750 displacement isn't more popular.)
 

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Power-wise, you'll get destroyed. The depending on the year, the SV is close in weight to a Gixxer 750, so you won't have a weight advantage to help in the corners. You could probably get on the gas sooner as the SV is less powerful, but I'd think that would be about the only edge, and then he'd just come by shortly after. Even a modded SV can only do so much to close the gap.

Can't speak to their crash resistance, but '98 and up Gixxer 750's have FI, as far as that goes.

(FWIW, the '01 Gixxer 750 was my all time favorite bike to ride. More midrange 'easyness' than a 600, more 'accessible' than a 1000. For the life of me I don't know why the 750 displacement isn't more popular.)
My guess is because the 600's have done a brilliant job of filling the gap to a liter bike. The torque and hp is damn impressive on the 600's right now.
 

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For the life of me I don't know why the 750 displacement isn't more popular.)

Only one reason, World Superbike.
750cc was THE class until '03 when WSK changed to the 800-1000cc rules, effectively wiping out the 750 class.
 

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Only one reason, World Superbike.
750cc was THE class until '03 when WSK changed to the 800-1000cc rules, effectively wiping out the 750 class.
Shhh.... leave me be with the sounds of ZX7RR's, 0W01's, and YZF750SP's ringing in my ears.

(I know, I know. I'm a big WSBK fan. 750 is still the perfect displacement damnit, IMHO. PF Chili, Donington, May 2001!)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Shhh.... leave me be with the sounds of ZX7RR's, 0W01's, and YZF750SP's ringing in my ears.

(I know, I know. I'm a big WSBK fan. 750 is still the perfect displacement damnit, IMHO. PF Chili, Donington, May 2001!)
I have to agree and all the above. BladeRacer hit the head on the nail with his post. It's a shame. Although I agree with Jdog, I've spoke to a few individuals from the 600 class and they say power delivery although impressive is almost dangerous. I've had a 600 just kill me up on the coast. To the point I was riding way over my head and it was not fun at that point. We took the girls out for a Sunday ride and then dropped them off and did a few miles on each others bikes and then switched back and that is the first time I felt uncomfortable, I mean, really uncomfortable. I got out of the groove and had to fight it the whole friggen way, never again.
 

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I have to agree and all the above. BladeRacer hit the head on the nail with his post. It's a shame. Although I agree with Jdog, I've spoke to a few individuals from the 600 class and they say power delivery although impressive is almost dangerous. I've had a 600 just kill me up on the coast. To the point I was riding way over my head and it was not fun at that point. We took the girls out for a Sunday ride and then dropped them off and did a few miles on each others bikes and then switched back and that is the first time I felt uncomfortable, I mean, really uncomfortable. I got out of the groove and had to fight it the whole friggen way, never again.
I recall when the R6 came out, it being described as a 4 stroke version of a 250. A few years later I was working for a Yamaha dealer, they spoke of a few that got sold coming back binned not long after.

(Thread hijack, 2.0)
 

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Cost wise, there always seems to be a lot of 600's out there that are track prepped, so that could be an option.
I rode the R6 and was amazed at the handling, but you really have to be mindful of the RPMs to be fast on it. Below 6k rpms there is no power and I think that is true of most of the 600s. A liter bike makes you lazy!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Power-wise, you'll get destroyed. The depending on the year, the SV is close in weight to a Gixxer 750, so you won't have a weight advantage to help in the corners. You could probably get on the gas sooner as the SV is less powerful, but I'd think that would be about the only edge, and then he'd just come by shortly after. Even a modded SV can only do so much to close the gap.

Can't speak to their crash resistance, but '98 and up Gixxer 750's have FI, as far as that goes.

(FWIW, the '01 Gixxer 750 was my all time favorite bike to ride. More midrange 'easyness' than a 600, more 'accessible' than a 1000. For the life of me I don't know why the 750 displacement isn't more popular.)
He seems to be more power hungry and now talks of only taking his Hyabusa out :idunno:. Need I say more? :rotfl:
 

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He seems to be more power hungry and now talks of only taking his Hyabusa out :idunno:. Need I say more? :rotfl:
At least he won't get passed on the straights... Busa's are pretty hard to ride fast at the track. Not saying that it can't be done, but they are pretty monstrous. If you can corner on one of them, you can ride about anything.
 

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At least he won't get passed on the straights... Busa's are pretty hard to ride fast at the track. Not saying that it can't be done, but they are pretty monstrous. If you can corner on one of them, you can ride about anything.
Could you imagine hustling a 'busa around a track for a day? :eek:

Wow.
 
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