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Discussion Starter #1
OK, the factory setup works pretty well but I'd like to reduce the excessive brake lever travel and overall vague feedback.

I'd like to hear feedback from anyone who been able to improve on the stock setup or has tried using 954 calipers (smaller bore) with the 929 master cylinder.
 

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I have found the front brakes on the 929 more than good enough, never had to use more than two fingers. You know you can adjust the travel of the front lever with the dial setting. ie 1-6 pull the lever in a bit and turn dial to were you want it.:thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm a 2-finger braker too, but I'd still like reduce the lever travel. I may be wrong, but I don't believe rotating the dial changes the travel, only the reach. If it does change the travel it can't be by much and the Pazzo lever I have installed has a lot more adjustment than the OEM lever.
 

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OK, the factory setup works pretty well but I'd like to reduce the excessive brake lever travel and overall vague feedback.

I'd like to hear feedback from anyone who been able to improve on the stock setup or has tried using 954 calipers (smaller bore) with the 929 master cylinder.
Have you already got steel lines?
How old is your brake fluid?
Are your discs and/or pads heavily worn?
I haven't had any problems with the stock brakes.
 

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I have found the front brakes on the 929 more than good enough, never had to use more than two fingers. You know you can adjust the travel of the front lever with the dial setting. ie 1-6 pull the lever in a bit and turn dial to were you want it.:thumb:
The span adjuster only adjusts the position of the lever. It doesn't alter its travel at all. You push the lever outwards to adjust it.
 

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My bad.. thought he ment how far the lever was away. And yes you right push lever not pull.....:bonk:
 

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I went to 1000rr front end with radial calipers and retained the 330 rotors with the stock master cylinder.The braking is improved noticably,however...i think stock 929 calipers are great and 954 ones are actualy the same...you wont see any diference.If you want to upgrade,first go to ss brake lines....next experiment with pads..and then calipers (either radial or normal)
 

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I went to 1000rr front end with radial calipers and retained the 330 rotors with the stock master cylinder.The braking is improved noticably,however...i think stock 929 calipers are great and 954 ones are actualy the same...you wont see any diference.If you want to upgrade,first go to ss brake lines....next experiment with pads..and then calipers (either radial or normal)
The 929/954 calipers are visually identical (as are F4i and some others) but have different sized pistons so they do feel different. Better or worse though would be down to personal preference.
 

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If you still have stock lines then more than likely they have swelled by now. Go to stainless steel braided lines, my stock lines were terrible last season, upgrading to ss over the winter.
 

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929 master cylinder - 19mm
954 master cylinder - 17.5mm (approx)

929 caliper pistons - 34mm + 30mm
954 caliper pistons - 32mm + 30mm

954 caliper pistons coated with 'nimuflon' ??
don't know if 929 same or what..!!
 

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The span adjuster only adjusts the position of the lever. It doesn't alter its travel at all. You push the lever outwards to adjust it.
umm if you have the lever all the way out away from the bar then it has more travel than if you had it all the way in closest to the bar. so yes the dial does affect travel.
 

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umm if you have the lever all the way out away from the bar then it has more travel than if you had it all the way in closest to the bar. so yes the dial does affect travel.
How do you figure this?
If the lever travel is being interrupted by hitting the handlebar then you'd be correct. If the end of the lever has two inches of travel it still has that two inches regardless of where you set the adjuster.
To alter the travel you need to alter the distance between the lever pivot and the adjuster and that doesn't change.
 

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Have you tried pushing the pistons all the way back into the calipers. It's easily done and I find it reduces lever travel and improves performance if done regularly.
 
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I ran into excessive lever travel issues when I put ASV levers and SS lines on my 07'. After doing this mod I noticed the lever travel was increased noticably. I first thought I had not bled the lines properly and bled them a few more times before I decided the problem was elsewhere. I removed the ASV levers and put the OEM levers back on. This decreased lever travel, so I measured total OEM travel, switched out to the ASV and measured again. With the ASV levers installed there was an additional 1/2" travel. I started looking at how the lever fit to the master cylinder and found the issue. There is a round cam with a hole in the lever(OEM & ASV) and a short rod protruding from the master cylinder which fits into the hole in the cam. This rod is the plunger that applies pressure to the hydraulic fluid. The ASV levers have their own cam and the hole in the ASV cam was 5mm deeper than the hole in the OEM cam. This is where the extra travel was coming from. It should be noted that the ASV levers are designed to fit a small range of bikes, not each specific bike. I ended up placing a few shims in the cam hole before fitting to the rod from the master and was able to void the extra travel. One too many shims and the brakes would lock(slowly) as they heated up though. Anyway, my main reason for switching the levers and lines in the first place was because I felt like the stock setup had excessive lever travel. I later found out that this travel is built in to the master cylinder itself to give a desired ammount of progression as the brakes are applied. The most noticable and effective way to alter the total lever travel is to change the master cylinder. I am no brake expert and these are things I found out by trial and error and asking people with some expertise in the field, so don't quote me.
 

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Have you tried pushing the pistons all the way back into the calipers. It's easily done and I find it reduces lever travel and improves performance if done regularly.
I agree with Macca here. I also recommend cleaning the pistons a bit. Really improves performance and lever travel, especially if you haven`t done it for a couple of years.
 

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Have you tried pushing the pistons all the way back into the calipers. It's easily done and I find it reduces lever travel and improves performance if done regularly.
If pushing the pistons back in and then out again reduces lever travel, it's likely because there was air tapped in the system near the top to start with. By pushing the pistons in, it forces the fluid back into the reservoir air and all.

Since these systems are difficult to bleed, doing this method may not be a bad idea after normal bleeding. It's like reverse bleeding and when you think about it, it's easier to move an air bubble up the system rather than trying to draw it down to the bleeders. Good one macca. :plus1:
 

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I find this system extremely difficult to bleed. And after several attemts to both bleed and pushing the pistons back all the way, my solution was to clean the pistons as good as i could with a clean rag and at the same time try to avoid that they popped out (one of them did, it was not pleasant). I found it difficult to clean all the surfaces because of obstacles. Beware, I try to be wise after open the second wine bottle. Its night time here in Norway... :idunno:
 

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I find this system extremely difficult to bleed. And after several attemts to both bleed and pushing the pistons back all the way, my solution was to clean the pistons as good as i could with a clean rag and at the same time try to avoid that they popped out (one of them did, it was not pleasant). I found it difficult to clean all the surfaces because of obstacles. Beware, I try to be wise after open the second wine bottle. Its night time here in Norway... :idunno:
If I've had any of the sytem apart for whatever reason I also gind it difficult to bleed. I get it blead as best I can...then fo for a careful ride down very quite roads braking regularly harder and harder getting a lot of heat into the system...go back home re-bleed...hey presto perfect lever feel and travel.
I've seen m/cylinder banjo bolts with a bleed nipple...maybe thats the way to go.
 

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If pushing the pistons back in and then out again reduces lever travel, it's likely because there was air tapped in the system near the top to start with. By pushing the pistons in, it forces the fluid back into the reservoir air and all.

Since these systems are difficult to bleed, doing this method may not be a bad idea after normal bleeding. It's like reverse bleeding and when you think about it, it's easier to move an air bubble up the system rather than trying to draw it down to the bleeders. Good one macca. :plus1:
Tah denzee ;) .
I don't think there are large amounts of air stuck in the lines as such, but I had'nt done this little trick for a while and on our last fast run through Gingers I noticed the lever coming back to the bar almost. So I performed my
"reverse bleed" when I got home and had a full lever again. I do it with all my bikes I've had.:thumb:
 
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