Honda Motorcycles - FireBlades.org banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone, new guy here. I have a ‘01 929 with 10,500 mile. Recently my front brake lever feels mushy when first applied after sitting (8+ hrs). After a couple of pumps it firms up pretty decently. The brakes work consistently even when the lever feels mush, it just takes a greater pull (almost to the bar), until they have been pumped a few times. My brake system is stock, except for the Motul RBF600 fluid. The mushy feeling did not come at the same time as the fluid change. I’ve re-bled the brakes and I’m pretty sure there is no air remaining. My pads are only worn down by about 1 mm. Any thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,301 Posts
There is probaby air in the MC. Bleed that. I had the same problem and found a ass load of air in the MC then it was great after that
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the feedback. Any tips on bleeding the MC? I unbolted it from the bar and angled it so that air would be able to travel up towards the transfer port, and into the reservoir. I've heard of cracking the banjo bolt at the MC and pumping the lever, but it would appear to allow air in also??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,301 Posts
All I did was sqeeze the lever and hold it, then lossen the bolt from the MC to the brake lines, let the air/fluid come out, tighten bolt then let go of brake. do this about 4 times and it should be good.

Also, I just let the air come out of the bolt hole, not the res. and take the lever to the handle bar before you retighten bolt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
I recall over on the VFR list multiple people saying they had an 'over night/weekend fix'. Basically they would put a few rubber bands or a zip-tie over the brake lever and squeeze it to about the half waypoint. Then use the rubber band or zip-tie to hold the brake lever in that position (I would do it to hard, just a decent two finger pull). Then let the bike at least sit over night if not a day or so. They felt that doing this allowed air to rise into the reservoir away from the lines. From what they all reported this made a huge improvement. Some of them said they would do it about once every 6 months even if there brakes felt fine and they would still see a slight improvement. Anyone tried or heard of this? I can always give it a go and let you know. Although my brakes are in good shape now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,271 Posts
ibAdam : I recall over on the VFR list multiple people saying they had an 'over night/weekend fix'. Basically they would put a few rubber bands or a zip-tie over the brake lever and squeeze it to about the half waypoint. Then use the rubber band or zip-tie to hold the brake lever in that position (I would do it to hard, just a decent two finger pull). Then let the bike at least sit over night if not a day or so. They felt that doing this allowed air to rise into the reservoir away from the lines. From what they all reported this made a huge improvement. Some of them said they would do it about once every 6 months even if there brakes felt fine and they would still see a slight improvement. Anyone tried or heard of this? I can always give it a go and let you know. Although my brakes are in good shape now.
This usually only works for a short period of time. Not unusual to see zip ties on the levers in the paddock, but after even 12 laps of hard braking, they usually are back to the way they were before locking them down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,098 Posts
ibAdam : I recall over on the VFR list multiple people saying they had an 'over night/weekend fix'. Basically they would put a few rubber bands or a zip-tie over the brake lever and squeeze it to about the half waypoint. Then use the rubber band or zip-tie to hold the brake lever in that position (I would do it to hard, just a decent two finger pull). Then let the bike at least sit over night if not a day or so. They felt that doing this allowed air to rise into the reservoir away from the lines. From what they all reported this made a huge improvement. Some of them said they would do it about once every 6 months even if there brakes felt fine and they would still see a slight improvement. Anyone tried or heard of this? I can always give it a go and let you know. Although my brakes are in good shape now.
This is only a temporary fix....the air bubbles in the system dissolve into solution because of the high pressure. In time, they come out of solution, and the lever is spongy again.

Think of a can of soda.....good analogy...

Edit:
The air never leaves the system, so this is not a substitute for bleeding ones brakes. It will temporarily firm up the lever of bikes that have a lot of air traps that are hard to bleed...ie VFR800 w/ LBS......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
768 Posts
Take of the reservoir cap, remove a caliper, pry the pads back in the bores. Replace that caliper, pump up the brakes, and repeat on the other side. You don't need to open the system, and it gets all the air out. Works better than banjo bleeder, speed bleeder, tie wrap on the bars, mityvac, or any other way.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top