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The service manual says to replace the brake bolts with new ones if you remove the calipers. So is this Honda hype or really necessary? Wouldn't it be easier and cheaper to just hit 'em with some Loc-tite and reinstall?
 

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Might be a normal ass-covering maneuver by Honda (and who can blame them). I've removed the calipers from each of my bikes (929,954,954), and never replaced the bolts
 

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ConqSoft : I remember this from a while back.    I think the issue was that the bolts actually stretch a bit, so it's best to replace them.  When I took mine off the do the safety wiring, I didn't replace them though.  
I recalled the topic, too, but couldn't find anything in a search of the old archives.
 

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I reuse them. I had one strip, so I'd recommend having spares on hand. When the dealer changes my tires, they remove the front calipers and reuse the same bolts. Just him 'em with red loctite.
 

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HondaGalToo : I reuse them.  I had one strip, so I'd recommend having spares on hand.  When the dealer changes my tires, they remove the front calipers and reuse the same bolts.  Just him 'em with red loctite.
Red or blue Loc-tite?  I've always used the blue for everything.  
 

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In a perfect world, I would follow the manual. However, when I asked my service rep at the dealer, he said they always reuse the bolts.



so, I don't know. However, I did reuse mine, and carefully torqued on reinstall. I think a one time reuse may be okay, but I could be wrong. So far, after at least 1000 miles no problems.

This is just my experience. Heck, I put new exhaust gaskets on with the TPIS long tube headers on the vette when everyone said you don't have to put new gaskets on.

I think a one time reuse, properly torqued, and checked after 50 miles is okay. FWIW
 

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If you don't have two hams attached to the end of your arms, re-using these bolts should be no problem.  I mentioned this before and a few members noted that they stripped out the bolts or 'stretched' them when re-using them.  I agree that safety wiring is important, but doesn't address the reason Honda recommends replacing them.  They aren't worried they will vibrate loose (what the safety wiring prevents), they are worried that they will break, because they can't be really hardened serious bolts because they are mated with an aluminum receiver and overtightening a 'soft' bolt will make them suspect in terms of longevity.  I have always tightened mine at some 10 to 15 % below the recommended torque settings, used blue loctite (although that is dubious as well, since Loctite states that steel and aluminum do not meet their criteria for bolt locking) and safety wired them.  Since the torque settings do not define the structural integrity of the bolt/caliper/fork relationship, just making certain they are intact and will not back out will more than meet the task (that is, if you haven't over tightened/stretched them).

I have used mine well over 40 times without a problem . . .
 

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abtech : If you don't have two hams attached to the end of your arms, re-using these bolts should be no problem.  I mentioned this before and a few members noted that they stripped out the bolts or 'stretched' them when re-using them.  I agree that safety wiring is important, but doesn't address the reason Honda recommends replacing them.  They aren't worried they will vibrate loose (what the safety wiring prevents), they are worried that they will break, because they can't be really hardened serious bolts because they are mated with an aluminum receiver and overtightening a 'soft' bolt will make them suspect in terms of longevity.  I have always tightened mine at some 10 to 15 % below the recommended torque settings, used blue loctite (although that is dubious as well, since Loctite states that steel and aluminum do not meet their criteria for bolt locking) and safety wired them.  Since the torque settings do not define the structural integrity of the bolt/caliper/fork relationship, just making certain they are intact and will not back out will more than meet the task (that is, if you haven't over tightened/stretched them).

I have used mine well over 40 times without a problem . . .
Thanks abtech, that's exactly what I needed to know.
 

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OTOH - this is not true for RSV-r's, but that cool covering they give you for the factory toolkit IS big enough to put your (now disattached_ caliper in and if you can find a friend with a Cruztools M14 you can rest it right on the top of your fairings for the ride home

Me - I just reused mine, but...there is always the risk factor of their loosening.
 

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FWIW, I just replaced a front tire and re-torqued the caliper bolts to 22 lb-ft just as the manual (& Ohlins) suggests (with a Snap-On torque wrench).  Did a trackday at Streets and one street day ride.  After the Sunday ride, I noticed that the front 208GP was starting to separate at the seam.  I'd heard of this B4 and dealer said to bring it in for a free replacement (gotta love that! ).  When I was removing the front wheel/tire, I discovered that 2 of the 4 caliper bolts had significantly backed out!

I, too, remember the other thread about caliper bolts and would normally replace them every time.  However, the bolts that came with the Ohlins R/T forks are different and I wanted to reuse the same kind and had no time to find/wait-for them.  I now use Blue Loctite on the caliper bolts and will be safety-wiring them very soon.
 

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did someone say snap-on torque wrench?

I have had my calipers off several times and never replaced the bolts. It would probably serve me well to look at them vewy, vewy carfury next time....but I dont plan on replacing them unless I think they need it.
 

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abtech : ...I have always tightened mine at some 10 to 15 % below the recommended torque settings, used blue loctite (although that is dubious as well, since Loctite states that steel and aluminum do not meet their criteria for bolt locking) and safety wired them.  . . .
I wonder how brake fluid effects locktite? Not that I would expect them to get wet with it....
 

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After an ugly mishap once of reusing my rotor bolts (one bolt snapped mid-torque and it was a bitch trying to extract it), I end up buying new bolts for those that are torqued a bit tight - those included the caliper bolts as well.
They're cheap anyway.
 

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I reused mine with no troubles just make sure to torque them and then check it again later. I think Honda reccomends replacement because they come with a pre-applied thread locking agent. I also bought a new set to keep on hand.
 

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Read what Abtech said. Replacement is recommended for at least the reasons that (a) use strips off the pre-coated threadlocker the bolts come with and (b) replacement gets you back to a fresh bolt just in case the bolt was ovrestressed and hence made liable to fail by over torquing.
It's VERY IMPORTANT not to overtorque these bolts.
It's also highly advisable that you stay away from the red Loctite and use the blue - the red's the high strength stud and bearing fit/permananent variety.
You might the bolts out if you are lucky (oily surface = weaker bond) but if you use it you'll very likely break bolts or strip threads without lots of heat - and I'd rather not be using too much heat around my callipers.
 

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LIABILITY! A $1.00 bolt failure could cost honda millions. Auto brake shops are usually very picky about the work they do. for example they will do the whole axle instead of one bad wheel. usually all the brake hardware is new as well. If you haven't overtorqued them they should be fine. I too have removed my calipers twice. I locktited them and torqued to factory specs.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
At a $1.44 each, I opted for the piece of mind and bought new bolts today. I figured better safe than sorry. At least I know I can always reuse them in a pinch.

Thanks to everyone for their input...
 

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AB954 : LIABILITY! A $1.00 bolt failure could cost honda millions. Auto brake shops are usually very picky about the work they do. for example they will do the whole axle instead of one bad wheel. usually all the brake hardware is new as well. If you haven't overtorqued them they should be fine. I too have removed my calipers twice. I locktited them and torqued to factory specs.
not really liability for auto brake shops.... if a vehicle has say, worn brake pads on one wheel, the other wheel has had the same amount of miles/wear put on it....why only do one side?

BLUE LOCKTITE IS EVERYONES FRIEND.... GET TO KNOW YOUR FRIEND, AND USE IT EVERYWHERE except for fasteners that contact body plastic
 
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