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Discussion Starter #1
Morning blade lovers,
I ordered a aftermarket res for front brake. i was wondering what is the right way of replacing it? drain fluid from calipers, or empty the res and just remove it ?
 

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The best way would be to drain the entire system and replace all the fluids with fresh. Never hurts to have fresh fluid and lines bled when doing that kind of work. It's not that tough a job either. Good luck!
 

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The best way in my opinion if you do not have a quick bleeder is to empty out the reservoir, then disconnect the reservoir from the hose that it's attached to. Make sure the oil inside the tube does not fall out . Then connect the new reservoir. Now, squeeze the tube that connects to the reservoir and master. The brake oil should now be visible inside the new reservoir because of the pressure on the tube. Do not let go of the hose until you add fresh brake fluid. Once that's completed, you can let go of the brake hose and begin to bleed the system from the calipers. Once you're getting the fresh oil out of the calipers, you can stop and button everything up. The reason for this method is because once you get air inside of the lines, it's a PITA to bleed the system to make sure all air pockets are out. Good luck
 

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The best way in my opinion if you do not have a quick bleeder is to empty out the reservoir, then disconnect the reservoir from the hose that it's attached to. Make sure the oil inside the tube does not fall out . Then connect the new reservoir. Now, squeeze the tube that connects to the reservoir and master. The brake oil should now be visible inside the new reservoir because of the pressure on the tube. Do not let go of the hose until you add fresh brake fluid. Once that's completed, you can let go of the brake hose and begin to bleed the system from the calipers. Once you're getting the fresh oil out of the calipers, you can stop and button everything up. The reason for this method is because once you get air inside of the lines, it's a PITA to bleed the system to make sure all air pockets are out. Good luck
:plus1: Well I *guess* you could it that way... Great answer Sab!
 

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:plus1: Well I *guess* you could it that way... Great answer Sab!
Thanks, I've banged my head up against a wall a few time trying to remove those dam air pockets. You learn tricks along the way that make life just a little easier. They're unconventional but they do work...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thank you for feedback, that's what I thought of doing but wanted make sure, I have Master bleed kit, going to empty the res, and replace then refill w new fluid, and flush calipers.
 

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The best way in my opinion if you do not have a quick bleeder is to empty out the reservoir, then disconnect the reservoir from the hose that it's attached to. Make sure the oil inside the tube does not fall out . Then connect the new reservoir. Now, squeeze the tube that connects to the reservoir and master. The brake oil should now be visible inside the new reservoir because of the pressure on the tube. Do not let go of the hose until you add fresh brake fluid. Once that's completed, you can let go of the brake hose and begin to bleed the system from the calipers. Once you're getting the fresh oil out of the calipers, you can stop and button everything up. The reason for this method is because once you get air inside of the lines, it's a PITA to bleed the system to make sure all air pockets are out. Good luck
Great tip! :thumb:
 

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I didn't have a lot of trouble when I replaced my lines. I just opened the bleeders on the calipers, attached a hose to them and submersed the ends in a bottle of brake fluid.
After filling the resevoir and letting it drain with the cap opened, I pumped the lever maintaining the fluid level until there were no bubbles coming out of the bleed lines. I think the most important part is making sure the hose attached to the bleeders stays submerged in fluid so it can't suck air in when you pump the brakes.
I think I found this method on YouTube after looking for how to bleed brake lines or may even have been on Galfers feed.
Seemed to work and really wasn't very hard to do.
 

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I didn't have a lot of trouble when I replaced my lines. I just opened the bleeders on the calipers, attached a hose to them and submersed the ends in a bottle of brake fluid.
After filling the resevoir and letting it drain with the cap opened, I pumped the lever maintaining the fluid level until there were no bubbles coming out of the bleed lines. I think the most important part is making sure the hose attached to the bleeders stays submerged in fluid so it can't suck air in when you pump the brakes.
I think I found this method on YouTube after looking for how to bleed brake lines or may even have been on Galfers feed.
Seemed to work and really wasn't very hard to do.
I have a dry brake system I have to fill with oil. I will try your tip on it. Thanks for sharing, I've never heard of this method...
 
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