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Discussion Starter #1
My readings were 18, 21, 22, 20.5. The bike smoothed right up at idle when I did the adjustment to equalize it at 18 across the board. I did notice when the bike got to 217F degrees or at about the point where the radiator fan comes on that the readings went a bit out of whack. No where close to as OOW as they were before the adjustment. So I got the Patton air mover fired up and aimed that the engine, went back in and fine tuned it to 18 CmHg on all gauges.

The TM64, is a wonderful tool and, as SuperDave said, a definite must for this procedure. It's a bargain at $20.00.  
Not having to deal with mercury in the manometer is wonderful. If one is considering buying a manometer get this one. It's worth it.

I avoided having to remove the PAIR reed valve hoses and plug the nipples by getting some 10' hemostats w/curved tips from a local surplus house for $8 each. They go in under the front of the airbox from each side and pinch the hoses nicely.

Additionally, John Morgan has gone from brass fittings to what I initially thought was plastic fittings. I asked him about these and here is his reply:

'Thanks for your interest in the adapters. Here are some details.
The adapters aren't 'plastic' as such. They are ultra-high temp 30% glass filled Nylon 66. It's an engineering material, not just 'plastic'.
We changed for several reasons:
Better quality than machined. Quite often the machining wouldn't be right and were rejected at inspection.
Easier to use. Nylon screws in and out easier in a hot engine and doesn't need as much tightening.
Won't damage the inlets if overtightened.
Does not transmit the heat as much so it's kinder to the rubber hoses and you don't burn your fingers as much removing them.
There is a slot on the spigot so they can be removed with a small screwdriver. Do not tighten with a screwdriver.
Once we pay for the expensive tooling for the injection mouldings they will be cheaper so we can stall price rises.'

These fittings were very easy to work with and probably an overall improvement over brass. I liked them.


This next part is a multipart observation/question. I'll be as succinct as I possiby can.

When I removed the vacuum screws was there a brown residue around them. It was sifficiently viscous such that it actually held a couple of the vacuum screw washers in place against the engine case after said screw was removed. It had a very strong...make that concentrated...petro-chemical odor.

Similarly, the last time I changed Fluffy's air filter (at ~18000 miles) there was a small amount of this same residue in portions of the bottom rear of the airbox. It wasn't present in the airbox the FIRST time I changed the air filter at ~9000 miles.

At 9000 miles I believe the synch was fine since the bike was running smoothly. In retrospect I'm thinking that at 18000 miles Fluffy was ready for a starter valve synchronization based on the fact that she had begun to run 'rougher' betwenn 9K and 18K miles.

Here's the multipart question.
Has anyone noticed any goo as described when you did your synch and/or changed your air filter?

I am curious as to the source if this goo.
Could it be a 'by-product' of out-of-synch starter valves? Could it be a 'normal by-product' of combustion, even though it wasn't in the airbox at 9000 miles?
OR

I'm eager to read any thoughts or reports you might have regarding this.


Take Care and TIA!!

Bushie
 

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Well i hope that fluffy is purring nicely now after the adjustments.

How about some comments on the performance gains ( or returns ) ??
 

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MACI4LIFE : Well i hope that fluffy is purring nicely now after the adjustments.

How about some comments on the performance gains ( or returns    )  ??
I'll post on that a.s.a.p.
Right now I'm out fondling Fluffy. I'll be riding her later after the 4play

Bushie
 

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BushrodW : ....
The adapters aren't 'plastic' as such. They are ultra-high temp 30% glass filled Nylon 66. It's an engineering material, not just 'plastic'....Bushie
I think I read somewhere in my carbtune documentation that the adapters are made of nitril.(sp)
 

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BushrodW : The TM64, is a wonderful tool and, as SuperDave said, a definite must for this procedure. It's a bargain at $20.00.  
Not having to deal with mercury in the manometer is wonderful.
OK, fired off a quick google and a site search and nothing on this thing. For $20 by the sounds of it, I need one. Where did you get it, and where can I check it out on the web (or at a shop??)

- H
 

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Holeshot : Quote (BushrodW @ Sep. 13 2003, 11:16am)The TM64, is a wonderful tool and, as SuperDave said, a definite must for this procedure. It's a bargain at $20.00.  
Not having to deal with mercury in the manometer is wonderful.
OK, fired off a quick google and a site search and nothing on this thing.  For $20 by the sounds of it, I need one.  Where did you get it, and where can I check it out on the web (or at a shop??)

- H
The TM64 is the flat blade adjusting tool that you use to turn the screws. I think you have to do a search for 'TM64 carburetor' Snap-On has them.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
figment :
....
I think I read somewhere in my carbtune documentation that the adapters are made of nitril.(sp)
ahh...I didn't see that in my CarbTuneII book. John had simply scored through the word 'brass' wherever it appeared.

After I read his e-mail about glass impregnated Nylon 66 or what ever he said I inspected these adapters more closely.

The first thing that came to my wee mind was Delrin.

If I remember correctly, nitrile is a soft, oil resistant rubber that o-rings and other such items are made from. Perhaps that's what the o-rings on the adpters are made from?

BW
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Holeshot :
The TM64, is a
OK, fired off a quick google and a site search and nothing on this thing.  For $20 by the sounds of it, I need one.  Where did you get it, and where can I check it out on the web (or at a shop??)

- H
here's the TM-64 link from SuperDave's most excellent KB post.

It's a 1/4' drive operated by a thumbwheel on the user end of the tool.

I called my local Snap-On guy and met him at of his stops near my house. Very simple, very easy . I didn't know who my local Snap-On guy was, so I called the area distribution center and they gave me his number.

BW
 

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Yes, I've had that 'goo' inside my airbox every time I've been in there, just figured it was from the crankcase breather. I did the sync. on my 954 a few weeks ago and just disconnected the vacuum tubes that run to the intakes under the injectors and hooked up my old trusty carbtune (with gasp...mercury&#33 and used a wrench to adjust the 'screws' (actually they have nuts on the end and adjust in steps on the 954) They weren't all that far out of whack but since adjusting them all as close as possible it made quite a difference. She idles MUCH smoother and getting back on the gas while leaned over is much improved too. Still not 'perfect' so I guess a PC111 is on my X-mas list!
 

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I agree with Slowpoke with regards to the brown shite in the airbox, I didn't notice it the first time I had a look in there but it's in there now, I put it down to me riding the bike more agressively as it is my first big bore bike and was a little gentle with it at first.

you can't expect to get away without some ridicule about calling your blade 'fluffy' please explain yourself!!!

that snap on tool looks really useful for the job too do you reckon it's agile enout to do the starter valves without removing the tank and airbox if you use one of these?

Cheers

Ben.
 

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BlueToy : that snap on tool looks really useful for the job too do you reckon it's agile enout to do the starter valves without removing the tank and airbox if you use one of these?

Cheers

Ben.
Ben, I would assume then that you already have the PAIR Valve blocked or out? BW was able to do the Synch without removing the airbox (I think) but did have to raise the tank to get access to the PAIR/reed valve hose. I myself, prefer to have the tank and airbox totally out to get a an easier view of everything. I would imagine it being quite difficult to do the Synch with both the tank and airbox on (assuming your PAIR valve is already blocked).

Dave
 

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On that note, I would attempt to keep the airbox in place during any of these adjustments as thats the kind of air the bike will be 'seeing' at idle, not an open airbox. I know that's the best way to get results with carbs because they need a vacum signal to work properly. I would assume the air 'quality and quantity' should translate with F.I. as well.
 
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