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That is never good to hear obviously.......I am afraid the same thing is about to happen here as spring approaches.....every single year unfortunately, our insurance regulations have deterred younger sport bike riders from getting into riding but even the old guys lose their minds early in the season:idunno::(
 

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I for one, don't have mixed feelings about that. We all know what a true sport bike rider seeks, and that's not cheap. Playing with death, trick it on every corner, what a great feeling........ The value of life increases exponentially with the risk we take, that's what we feel in those moments....yes, that's madness and we love it. Sometimes in the morning, before entering the garage with the helmet in one hand and the key in the other i'm so afraid that my feet trembles. After i start the engine i forget everything about fear and almost everything else.....i'm the perfect machine, one with the bike . Respect for those who died on two wheels knowing the risk from the first place, for those who didn't ...that is called natural selection
 

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I for one, don't have mixed feelings about that. We all know what a true sport bike rider seeks, and that's not cheap. Playing with death, trick it on every corner, what a great feeling........ The value of life increases exponentially with the risk we take, that's what we feel in those moments....yes, that's madness and we love it. Sometimes in the morning, before entering the garage with the helmet in one hand and the key in the other i'm so afraid that my feet trembles. After i start the engine i forget everything about fear and almost everything else.....i'm the perfect machine, one with the bike . Respect for those who died on two wheels knowing the risk from the first place, for those who didn't ...that is called natural selection
I get what you are saying, after almost three decades of sport bike riding I get a surge of intense awareness when I get on my bike that compares with nothing else. Over time I am not sure if I am a better rider or less of a risk taker, or possibly both, unlike you though I am not as flippant about getting killed because there are people that depend on me to provide for them so I try at this time of my life to manage the risk more responsibly as compared to my younger years.......go a little easier friend there are people out there that would like to see you live until the next day:thumb:
 

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I get what you are saying, after almost three decades of sport bike riding I get a surge of intense awareness when I get on my bike that compares with nothing else. Over time I am not sure if I am a better rider or less of a risk taker, or possibly both, unlike you though I am not as flippant about getting killed because there are people that depend on me to provide for them so I try at this time of my life to manage the risk more responsibly as compared to my younger years.......go a little easier friend there are people out there that would like to see you live until the next day:thumb:
:plus1:perfectly said and yet there's no coin here, there are not only two sides, things seems to be interconnected somehow on many levels. Maybe a risk taker must connect more dots for his way back home.............but, what if you can loose the line between two dots just for not being a risk taker?
 

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Just to add on to this madness...

4/13/14 7:00pm
Motorcycle v. car collision at intersection. Two eyewitnesses describe the rider face down with a huge pool of blood around him. I was working on Serenity when I first heard about it. A lady pulled up to drop some young-ones off where I live and told me to be careful riding. She is a nurse and just got off duty at the hospital. With tears in her eyes she described having to drive by the rider, seemingly killed in the accident. Police stated that the rider was pronounced dead on the way to the hospital.


4/13/14 8:15pm
Single vehicle motorcycle accident on Foley Beach Expressway. Condition of the rider is unknown at this time.



Be safe out there guys! The lady didn't describe the bike to me at first, and my roommate and friend were out riding tonight (separately). My heart just sank when she told me about it as I feared it was one of them. Just earlier in the day my roommate was complaining that I don't go fast enough on our rides (5-15mph over speed limit is typical for me).

Hopefully know he knows why I play safely on the streets and only open up a little bit when it is safe to do so. Middle of spring break traffic right now, so a lot of young, dumb, and possibly drunk college students running around here not paying any attention.



Edit: There was a possible third accident (motorcycle involved) at around 10:00pm only about 150 yards from the location of the fatal accident.
 

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Just to add on to this madness...

4/13/14 7:00pm
Motorcycle v. car collision at intersection. Two eyewitnesses describe the rider face down with a huge pool of blood around him. I was working on Serenity when I first heard about it. A lady pulled up to drop some young-ones off where I live and told me to be careful riding. She is a nurse and just got off duty at the hospital. With tears in her eyes she described having to drive by the rider, seemingly killed in the accident. Police stated that the rider was pronounced dead on the way to the hospital.


4/13/14 8:15pm
Single vehicle motorcycle accident on Foley Beach Expressway. Condition of the rider is unknown at this time.



Be safe out there guys! The lady didn't describe the bike to me at first, and my roommate and friend were out riding tonight (separately). My heart just sank when she told me about it as I feared it was one of them. Just earlier in the day my roommate was complaining that I don't go fast enough on our rides (5-15mph over speed limit is typical for me).

Hopefully know he knows why I play safely on the streets and only open up a little bit when it is safe to do so. Middle of spring break traffic right now, so a lot of young, dumb, and possibly drunk college students running around here not paying any attention.



Edit: There was a possible third accident (motorcycle involved) at around 10:00pm only about 150 yards from the location of the fatal accident.

Bugger :-(
Sorry to hear that RR.

We're still having carnage here, two drivers charged over the deaths of two riders this week.
Last week when I checked, motorcycles were one-third of our road toll so far this year.
 

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Very sad, two young ones here already. One by car the other following too close.
Another young guy on my 250/300 forum is being pressured to move up to a 600. :thumbd:

I prefer to copy those old guys that have ridden accident free for 60 years etc. Lots of sportbike riders have been avoiding accidents their whole life.

Around other humans, no silly risks. Not worth it. On a track, it's a choice of how far to push it but everyone around you is in the same boat, not like a kid walking to school. Big difference.

By myself, yes, no airbags so it's a managed risk. Still a motorcycle and pavement.
 

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Small update on the fatal accident- It was a female rider on a full-dress Harley.. I had to go right by the spot where it happened and you can definitely see the blood-stained road, there must have been a good bit of blood spilled to make the spot as big as it is (blood is decently thick).

From what I understand the rider really wasn't wearing any gear except for a helmet, and it was only one of those little half-shell helmets. I still haven't managed to get the full story on what happened though, if I do I'll update you.
 

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Small update on the fatal accident- It was a female rider on a full-dress Harley.. I had to go right by the spot where it happened and you can definitely see the blood-stained road, there must have been a good bit of blood spilled to make the spot as big as it is (blood is decently thick).

From what I understand the rider really wasn't wearing any gear except for a helmet, and it was only one of those little half-shell helmets. I still haven't managed to get the full story on what happened though, if I do I'll update you.
WOW, so sad and so scary at the same time! I do believe, when it is your time to go, no matter what you are doing, its your time to go! Life is scary and unpredictable. Life is short and sometimes unappreciated! Be thankful and be happy everyday, it can change in an instant!:patriot:
 

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Wearing a 1/2 clam shell is heavily geared for the Harley crowd, most wear bandanas and wife beater T shirts, so it was an act of futility, was it not?
Some would disagree with "your time to go" and "natural selection" or "people that depend on me to provide for them so I try at this time of my life to manage the risk more responsibly." I'd agree with those that disagree.
All of these are phrases of denial. All of it is flirting with death. No helmet changes that. No careful and slow method changes it either. Many die by the act of another and you're never protected against a 2500 lb car on a bike. Preserving life wins the debate, doesn't it, especially with family responsibilities, as if no one here has a parent, sister/brother, or child? Does it compare to sky diving, scuba diving, horseback riding, and other recreational activities that seem more innocent in nature but if you check, it's not less dangerous? Should we live in a plastic bubble and engage in nothing exciting?
A balanced view of what you choose to do, and how to do it is a personal one. "Ride Safe" means what? When you make the decision to increase your risk of death mounting a motorcycle, it's rather ignorant to qualify that risk by how you do it, or how someone else failed, or when your time is up. If you set yourself on fire as a stunt routinely on weekends and you finally burned to death, is that an accident too? What supports the theory of natural selection, or going at a predestined time? As far as riding a motorcycle like an old lady, one could argue you're about to become complacent and never see what hits you. If you ride, it was your decision to do so. It's that simple. After the fact, it's no surprise. If you get hit or roll high side, you're chances of making it are slim at best. Putting any other label on it is perhaps driven by emotion, not cognitive thinking. It's deadly, and you can die or be disfigured for what's left of your life. Safe riders still die. Riders with full gear, still die. Statistics don't really change until you're off a motorcycle. Professionals and imbeciles alike get buried every day from motorcycle accidents.

It's best to face the reality, soberly, and either assess your temporary pleasure for the permanent grieving family you leave behind that is was really worth it, than not to think about it while you can and just stop, and spare everyone the experience. Who doesn't already understand that you can take months/years of recovery to feed yourself again and you have supporting loved ones to handle that for you until you can, if you're lucky? That the sheer pain of losing limbs or skin while enduring several surgical procedures to look less frightening to people in restaurants is worth the fun of riding? If you ride guilt free now, how will you feel after your wreck and who can cover the costs of medical and loss of work for a year on this forum, or would want to?

One fraction of a second will catch you by surprise, and changes your whole life, job, future, and relationships, if you live, are the facts. A minor fender bender for a car, is death for the biker. Accidents happen, and you can't prevent it. But don't worry about it, anything you worry about is in itself a distraction when reflex speed is needed to execute a move that can save your life. I do that best when I'm what beginner riders call a maniac. The adrenaline rush works in my favor. So far, so good. I rather get the finger than a wood box. Is that less value for life than the next rider? Is that more insane? Well, I can verbalize and distinguish the two and not make up stories or make excuses to deny it.
The one thing riding a motorcycle for me does, is makes me happy, and I don't have to go slow, or wear a turtle suit, and it's better than slowly dying by an armed drug addict trying to rob me or getting a heart attack. When I ride, I try to stay alive and see what blind cagers are about to do to challenge that fact. When I get off the bike and realize I was protecting my life the whole time, after the ride, it deserves the same intensity, and dedication to do my best.
I made my personal decision for reasons no one else shares. It's my right. It's my life. Enjoy yours. After all, we all ride, and we're trying to stay alive, and can share the experience.
 

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Wearing a 1/2 clam shell is heavily geared for the Harley crowd, most wear bandanas and wife beater T shirts, so it was an act of futility, was it not?
Some would disagree with "your time to go" and "natural selection" or "people that depend on me to provide for them so I try at this time of my life to manage the risk more responsibly." I'd agree with those that disagree.
All of these are phrases of denial. All of it is flirting with death. No helmet changes that. No careful and slow method changes it either. Many die by the act of another and you're never protected against a 2500 lb car on a bike. Preserving life wins the debate, doesn't it, especially with family responsibilities, as if no one here has a parent, sister/brother, or child? Does it compare to sky diving, scuba diving, horseback riding, and other recreational activities that seem more innocent in nature but if you check, it's not less dangerous? Should we live in a plastic bubble and engage in nothing exciting?
A balanced view of what you choose to do, and how to do it is a personal one. "Ride Safe" means what? When you make the decision to increase your risk of death mounting a motorcycle, it's rather ignorant to qualify that risk by how you do it, or how someone else failed, or when your time is up. If you set yourself on fire as a stunt routinely on weekends and you finally burned to death, is that an accident too? What supports the theory of natural selection, or going at a predestined time? As far as riding a motorcycle like an old lady, one could argue you're about to become complacent and never see what hits you. If you ride, it was your decision to do so. It's that simple. After the fact, it's no surprise. If you get hit or roll high side, you're chances of making it are slim at best. Putting any other label on it is perhaps driven by emotion, not cognitive thinking. It's deadly, and you can die or be disfigured for what's left of your life. Safe riders still die. Riders with full gear, still die. Statistics don't really change until you're off a motorcycle. Professionals and imbeciles alike get buried every day from motorcycle accidents.

It's best to face the reality, soberly, and either assess your temporary pleasure for the permanent grieving family you leave behind that is was really worth it, than not to think about it while you can and just stop, and spare everyone the experience. Who doesn't already understand that you can take months/years of recovery to feed yourself again and you have supporting loved ones to handle that for you until you can, if you're lucky? That the sheer pain of losing limbs or skin while enduring several surgical procedures to look less frightening to people in restaurants is worth the fun of riding? If you ride guilt free now, how will you feel after your wreck and who can cover the costs of medical and loss of work for a year on this forum, or would want to?

One fraction of a second will catch you by surprise, and changes your whole life, job, future, and relationships, if you live, are the facts. A minor fender bender for a car, is death for the biker. Accidents happen, and you can't prevent it. But don't worry about it, anything you worry about is in itself a distraction when reflex speed is needed to execute a move that can save your life. I do that best when I'm what beginner riders call a maniac. The adrenaline rush works in my favor. So far, so good. I rather get the finger than a wood box. Is that less value for life than the next rider? Is that more insane? Well, I can verbalize and distinguish the two and not make up stories or make excuses to deny it.
The one thing riding a motorcycle for me does, is makes me happy, and I don't have to go slow, or wear a turtle suit, and it's better than slowly dying by an armed drug addict trying to rob me or getting a heart attack. When I ride, I try to stay alive and see what blind cagers are about to do to challenge that fact. When I get off the bike and realize I was protecting my life the whole time, after the ride, it deserves the same intensity, and dedication to do my best.
I made my personal decision for reasons no one else shares. It's my right. It's my life. Enjoy yours. After all, we all ride, and we're trying to stay alive, and can share the experience.

It doesn't require too much cognitive ability to see that wearing protective gear and practising your road skills can indeed make crashing survivable, and it certainly reduces your recovery time, and that of those witnessing your efforts.

Yes, wearing proper gear and riding skillfully are no guarantee of your survival, there's always the "golden BB" that nobody can protect us from. But it'd be _really_ stupid to give up those simple protections, and even worse to actually try to convince others to do so...
Being able to crash and simply stand up to look at the damage is a far better result than hoping a passerby can keep you alive while waiting for an ambulance, while you lay there taking no responsibilty at all.

In Australia we have something called Medicare so it doesn't cost us anything for our (non-voluntary) medical procedures, it's all included in our taxes. In road accidents we also have compulsory third party insurance included in our registration fees to recompense people injured by our efforts - that includes yourself and passengers in your own vehicle.

In thirty road and race crashes it has never cost me anything for ambulances, surgery, hospital stays or doctors.
And my own insurances actually pay me money when I hurt myself on the track.
When I crash, I pay to repair the bike, replace my leathers, boots, gloves and lid, and put another tank of juice in as soon as I'm able to ride again.

My girlfriend and I were discussing this when we watched Breaking Bad and they were adding up Walt's medical expenses. I have friends that have won and lost their battles with cancer (one mate has beaten it twice now) and I can't imagine what their lives would've been like if they'd have had to pay for their treatments, or even if they'd had to pay for insurances to cover it.
 

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^^ The biggest problem with the United States is our healthcare laws. The new passed ones are not any better than the ones that they replaced. It is terrible how much we are expected to pay hospitals for any injury, and the insurance costs are almost as bad. Under "Obamacare" the "affordable healthcare act" I am expected/required to pay $600 month just for my wife an myself; two people that do not even go to the doctor's office unless we absolutely have to. The last time I went to a medical facility I paid in advance for the appointment, which cost me $75 for the visit..... that's the only time I've been to the doctor (that I'm required to pay for) for years. $600/month? Insanity.

Anyone that believes that riding in the proper gear makes NO difference at all has either not been down or it only justifying their ignorance to the facts. In Alabama a helmet is the minimum standard by law. I choose to ride in jeans, boots, armored jacket, leather gloves, and a good helmet because I have been down without this gear. It took about a month just to get all my skin back. Now, the last time I went down I was wearing gear and walked away with a couple bruises and mildly scraped knee.... I didn't even go straight home, rather I rode around for another 45 minutes and enjoyed the fact that I was able to do so.
 

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I'm gonna sit this one out Demon, if I get started on Obama and his "plan", I lose all ability to control my rage.:pissed:
Thank God for the 2 term limit, or I swear to God I'd move to Canada! Australia if I could work there and own property as I love their views on several issues.
 

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^^ The biggest problem with the United States is our healthcare laws. The new passed ones are not any better than the ones that they replaced. It is terrible how much we are expected to pay hospitals for any injury, and the insurance costs are almost as bad. Under "Obamacare" the "affordable healthcare act" I am expected/required to pay $600 month just for my wife an myself; two people that do not even go to the doctor's office unless we absolutely have to. The last time I went to a medical facility I paid in advance for the appointment, which cost me $75 for the visit..... that's the only time I've been to the doctor (that I'm required to pay for) for years. $600/month? Insanity.

Anyone that believes that riding in the proper gear makes NO difference at all has either not been down or it only justifying their ignorance to the facts. In Alabama a helmet is the minimum standard by law. I choose to ride in jeans, boots, armored jacket, leather gloves, and a good helmet because I have been down without this gear. It took about a month just to get all my skin back. Now, the last time I went down I was wearing gear and walked away with a couple bruises and mildly scraped knee.... I didn't even go straight home, rather I rode around for another 45 minutes and enjoyed the fact that I was able to do so.

I can relate, being self-employed my whole life you _never_ go to see doctors unless it's via ambulance :)

I think the US will struggle to fix a lot of their "capitalism" simply because too many people are raping the system of ludicrous amounts of money - actors, musicians, sports stars, TV "personalities", news readers, politicians, lawyers, doctors, share traders, realtors, it's a long list, and most sickenly, they get applauded for it. No US government is ever going to stand up against people with money, and no actor _deserves_ a million dollars a year for making movies. There are trillions of dollars locked up by a mere handful of people, while the rest of the country struggles. Perhaps after the government collapses it'll improve.
 

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I can relate, being self-employed my whole life you _never_ go to see doctors unless it's via ambulance :)

I think the US will struggle to fix a lot of their "capitalism" simply because too many people are raping the system of ludicrous amounts of money - actors, musicians, sports stars, TV "personalities", news readers, politicians, lawyers, doctors, share traders, realtors, it's a long list, and most sickenly, they get applauded for it. No US government is ever going to stand up against people with money, and no actor _deserves_ a million dollars a year for making movies. There are trillions of dollars locked up by a mere handful of people, while the rest of the country struggles. Perhaps after the government collapses it'll improve.
I agree with you, if it was only a $million/year that wouldn't be so bad! Let's not forget however that our system is also being raped by a large majority of low-lifes on welfare. I see it every day, people paying with EBT cards, then loading their groceries, all the brand name stuff mind you, into $50k+ SUV's with more $ in wheels and tires than my cars are worth. All while my wife shops for sales and uses coupons, so that our tax dollars can pay their government assisted housing. Some deal drugs, the ones with legal jobs supplement their income by working under the table and thus keep their low income status and pay no taxes. Anyone who thinks I'm stereotyping I invite you to come visit and see it with your own eyes. My neighbor, while a nice guy, has 2 Escalades sitting in the driveway and a Road King he has $40k into. Some mail was mistakingly delivered to us a couple years ago, bankruptcy documents. Supposedly has a legit job, but he's home most days. My wife and I both worked hard to put ourselves through school and have worked full-time ever since and have never even thought of defaulting on a single $ we've borrowed. The older I get the more I despise these burdens on society.
 
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30 road and track wrecks? Is that the exception or the norm? How many traffic lights and intersections are on the track? Any blind spots, tractor trailers and Friday rush hour on the track? How many inattentive minivans with texting drivers plague Australian roads? I would say any ER nurse who has witnessed 100s of motorcycle deaths in the US, broken necks, spines, organ ruptures, and large blood loss aren't protected by Arai helmet equipment. On the track you have wide open space, on the road, you have traffic that adds to the risk by logarithmic proportions. Any beginners course emphasizes that fact.
A guy I know personally, was riding on a Gold wing, sat a traffic light and was plowed over by a minivan, a month ago. He can't speak like he used to, he stutters and can't complete his sentences. His head literally has a dent in it now. He lost his job, a 18 year career that paid well in a tough economy. His medical bills will consume his savings, or credit score at the least. The ringing in his ears, pain from 3 broken vertebrae, and his bills are exceed $400,000. When he finishes his surgeries, he might post his opinion not so far off from his recovery time about how careful a rider he was, and it didn't change what hit him 40 mph from behind. Sure, one can routinely look for such an impact, but all it takes is that one time you rethink all the training and skill in the world, isn't going to change the carelessness of another person on the road. Maybe it will be safer, when we evolve with eyes all around our heads, to can see everything coming without surprise, and our practicing will then pay off?

I've only had three or four track crashes, most by far are on the road, and due to exactly the changing conditions you mentioned. But I wear full race gear so my injuries have been fairly minor, mainly broken bones and concussions, I've never lost any blood but do have a small friction burn on my arm. My lungs collapsed once due to a _lot_ of broken ribs.
Two of my mates have been knocked down from behind while stationary, one was uninjured, the second had only minor injuries but his bike was a write-off.
Does your mate have income protection insurance to get him and his family through such an event, or does he subscribe to your theory of taking zero responsibility?
You missed my comment about the "golden BB" I guess...
I have lost two friends fairly recently that were riding "safely" when both had a car turn across them leaving nowhere to go. Neither had any chance of avoiding the impact. I have survived a very similar accident myself that destroyed my first GSXR750.
 

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Anyone that believes that riding in the proper gear makes NO difference at all has either not been down or it only justifying their ignorance to the facts. In Alabama a helmet is the minimum standard by law. I choose to ride in jeans, boots, armored jacket, leather gloves, and a good helmet because I have been down without this gear. It took about a month just to get all my skin back. Now, the last time I went down I was wearing gear and walked away with a couple bruises and mildly scraped knee.... I didn't even go straight home, rather I rode around for another 45 minutes and enjoyed the fact that I was able to do so.
out of curiosity, why'd you go down those 2 times?
 

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out of curiosity, why'd you go down those 2 times?
Both of those offs were the only ones I've had for a street bike, hundreds more on dirt bikes... but that is fairly common for dirt bikes.

Both times because I was being an idiot...

The first time I had 1927 miles on my NEW '08 CBR 600 RR, 4th of July at 0200 (a.m). I was out by the beach doing wheelies and just being, like I said, an idiot. I pulled it up and decided to ride one out... well I ended up going too far with it and entered what should have been a sweeping turn. I dropped the front end down really quick and leaned it over into the turn. I went from the center of the road, to the outside of the outside lane before I got the front tyre back down. When I leaned into the turn I nailed a patch of sand and there she went, right out from underneath me.
*Edit* She didn't come out from under me, but rather landed right on top of me.... pinned my knee between the road and the frame because I was trying to "save it" since it was so new- stupid move.

The second time was on my current '02 CBR954RR... again I was being an idiot. I had been goofing off a lot for a few weeks getting used to the cornering and turning of this fine Blade. Ironically I had only put about 2,000miles on it at this time.... Anyway, so I dove into a corner at 35(ish)mph. I really don't know what happened this time. I hit the apex and started to roll the throttle open and them BAM, she's on the ground with me following her. This time I had on a helmet (of course), Icon jacket, Icon mesh gloves, jeans, and regular boots. I was back on my feet and had the bike back up within 15 seconds.

The gear is what made a big difference the second time. While the speed was lower, the gear took a beating that would have otherwise been my body. I ripped up the toe of the boot, scrapped up the arm of my jacket, and rashed up the gloves. My jeans had a little scuff mark and a matching scuff on my right knee. I bruised my hip pretty good and was sore for a few days, but I walked away- then rode away.
 
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