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Discussion Starter #1
Any of you guys have a career that has nothing to do with what you studied in college?

I'm having some doubts about what I want to do when I get out. I'm almost done (6 months if I graduate, 3 months if I flunk out). I have my bachelors already and interned at a few places related to my studies, but nothing really got me fired up. I got bored quick.

How easy is it to get a job not related to your degree?
 

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Wow a serious lack of information.

I have a BSEE but most of my jobs have been in computers or systems engineering. A degree just gets you in the door then you can get experience and find your niche. The other thing to remember is most degrees fit a wide variety of jobs so find yours. For instance I prefer scientific programming with some systems work. However I could easily get a job in management, programming of a variety of stuff, or systems engineering.
 

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I have a BSCE, currently attempting MS. I interned at both government and private.

I actually had a job with the city when I first finished school. It was so boring, I was practically getting paid to sit on my ass. It was the most tedious, meaningless, and mindless job on earth. It was like watching paint dry. There was practically no engineering being done. It was mostly cost analysis on projects. Almost all the engineering was farmed out to private firms. That place was a joke. The starting pay and benefits were great, but I couldn't stand the work I was doing. I could have lived a reasonably comfortable life had I stayed but instead I quit after 3 months and went back to school.

My last job was okay, I was interning for a construction company. I liked being in the construction site and it was a blast learning about how a building is thrown together. My boss was great and he really explained the ins and outs of the business. I screwed up and got fired (late to work too many times).

So here I am. I may or may not flunk out of school. I have absolutely no work references and on top of that I was fired from my last job. I think my chances of getting a job in construction is horrible. So I'm starting from scratch. I feel like my life is ruined and I haven't even started.
 

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kinkeringkong said:
I have a BSCE, currently attempting MS. I interned at both government and private.

I actually had a job with the city when I first finished school. It was so boring, I was practically getting paid to sit on my ass. It was the most tedious, meaningless, and mindless job on earth. It was like watching paint dry. There was practically no engineering being done. It was mostly cost analysis on projects. Almost all the engineering was farmed out to private firms. That place was a joke. The starting pay and benefits were great, but I couldn't stand the work I was doing. I could have lived a reasonably comfortable life had I stayed but instead I quit after 3 months and went back to school.

My last job was okay, I was interning for a construction company. I liked being in the construction site and it was a blast learning about how a building is thrown together. My boss was great and he really explained the ins and outs of the business. I screwed up and got fired (late to work too many times).

So here I am. I may or may not flunk out of school. I have absolutely no work references and on top of that I was fired from my last job. I think my chances of getting a job in construction is horrible. So I'm starting from scratch. I feel like my life is ruined and I haven't even started.
You might have to go through some crap jobs to overcome the stigma of being fired however you are far from ruined. Go for it and be ready to be told no a lot of times. One yes and you are back in it, then improve from there. You can do what you want but it takes effort that is part of why we get paid ;)

Good luck.

Ooops and show up on time in the future if that is what the boss wants :thumb:
 

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Since I started working 10 years ago, the job I currently hold is really the only one that I can honestly say that I've been truly happy with. Professionally, it's taken me 3yrs and 3 jobs to get to where I am. It's not easy. You probably just spent a boatload of money on your education. Try to at least break even, if nothing more. Will I always do what I do now and what I went to school for? Not necessarily...but for now I found my niche and I'm going with it. We'll see where life takes me.
 

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I can't speak for any other career fields, but I work in IT which has its own strange set of rules.

Mainly experience counts more than anything else when you are trying to get the job, but formal education is the main deciding factor when your pay is concerned. In my current and previous jobs I blew the interviews out of the water, since I know my stuff. But, HR wouldn't give me the pay I wanted, because I didn't have a degree. The recruiter for my current job went so far to say "It really doesn't even matter what the degree is in... it could be Underwater Basket Weaving for all I care, I just need to be able to check the box." I have had bosses with Physical Therapy and Liberal Arts degrees, and one of my former USMC Company Commanders had a masters degree in Physics from UC Berkeley. Just goes to show that your degree doesn't always dictate what you end up doing later in life.

For what it's worth, I absolutely hate my current job... I am already looking to quit in the next month or so, after having only worked there about 5 months. My last job was freakin AWESOME, but shitty management made everyone leave.
 

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ND4SPD said:
Since I started working 10 years ago, the job I currently hold is really the only one that I can honestly say that I've been truly happy with. Professionally, it's taken me 3yrs and 3 jobs to get to where I am. It's not easy. You probably just spent a boatload of money on your education. Try to at least break even, if nothing more. Will I always do what I do now and what I went to school for? Not necessarily...but for now I found my niche and I'm going with it. We'll see where life takes me.
My debt isn't going to be too bad, that is if I can find a decent job. I also feel like I'll go where life takes me, but I'm just worried about the recent turn of events. I haven't been fired before, has me spooked.


navydevildoc said:
I can't speak for any other career fields, but I work in IT which has its own strange set of rules.

Mainly experience counts more than anything else when you are trying to get the job, but formal education is the main deciding factor when your pay is concerned. In my current and previous jobs I blew the interviews out of the water, since I know my stuff. But, HR wouldn't give me the pay I wanted, because I didn't have a degree. The recruiter for my current job went so far to say "It really doesn't even matter what the degree is in... it could be Underwater Basket Weaving for all I care, I just need to be able to check the box." I have had bosses with Physical Therapy and Liberal Arts degrees, and one of my former USMC Company Commanders had a masters degree in Physics from US Berkeley. Just goes to show that your degree doesn't always dictate what you end up doing later in life.

For what it's worth, I absolutely hate my current job... I am already looking to quit in the next month or so, after having only worked there about 5 months. My last job was freakin AWESOME, but shitty management made everyone leave.
You are absolutely right about experience. At my construction job, everyone learned through experience. Compared to them, the engineers at city didn't know jack sh*t. I had a lot of respect for everyone at the construction company, they weren't all talk like the folks in city.
 

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kinkeringkong said:
Any of you guys have a career that has nothing to do with what you studied in college?

I'm having some doubts about what I want to do when I get out. I'm almost done (6 months if I graduate, 3 months if I flunk out). I have my bachelors already and interned at a few places related to my studies, but nothing really got me fired up. I got bored quick.

How easy is it to get a job not related to your degree?
Okay, nothing in college could prepare me for my current position. So, that is kinda bass-ackwards.

My advice, graduate (suck it up and just do it) or earn your masters or whatever, in whatever the field or major is. At least that will show you can complete something (to counter the "can't show up on time" thing). Bonus is, you'll always have that to fall back on.

There are plaenty of ooprotunities in the "public service" or "social service" areas that ask for a degree, not necessarily in a related field - some are fun, and some suck.

Just find out what you want to do now, and do it. If that's not what you want to do forever, then go back to what you're qualified for (until something you want to do again comes along).:eyebrows:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Scout said:
There are plaenty of ooprotunities in the "public service" or "social service" areas that ask for a degree, not necessarily in a related field - some are fun, and some suck.
I'm afraid I can't agree there, but that's only because I've only seen the engineering side of "public service".

The worst out of all my jobs was working at Public Works. Those clowns had a job that a high school drop out could have handled. I remember one of my little projects there was to catalogue the trees in the city. WTF?! Anybody could have done that. I liked my cashiering job 10 times more than that, even though the pay was considerably less.

In city/public works, it seemed like (and I was also told) that the only way to move up was to kiss ass, that or you had better know someone. Experience didn't count for much.
 

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kinkeringkong said:
I'm afraid I can't agree there, but that's only because I've only seen the engineering side of "public service".
one word = intern, take it FWIW.

Going to school is the best way to show people (namely employers) you can learn something, and that you're hopefully responsible and have made an investment in self-betterment and will now do so for their organization. Even basket weaving as NDD said - but it shows that sponge upstairs is working.

No matter what kind of job you get - there will be learning involved, school just teaches you the principles or hopefully foundation for the base of knowledge you'll be acquiring in your field. So naturally employers want someone that has a dedicated track record for learning, managing assignments, etc. If you can't actually do that, well - you do the math.

Another very important thing to realize is you're young - your mind is most likely the most friendly to learning now. Should you decide to phuckit and flunk/leave/disassociate with school etc. - going back will always be a challenge and you may not have the option no matter what you believe now.

Obviously the choice you have in front of you is one that will affect your quality of life for the rest of your time on this planet. I highly suggest you stick with it and at least get the paper, then pump gas if you want to - but you still got the paper for when you decide otherwise.


I don't have a degree, very fortunately I was fostered into the technology field at a point in time when my skillset was in demand so not alot of questions were asked about education, it was all experience. I was going to school mind you, but the job I had at the time dictated otherwise and I somewhat hesitantly discontinued. It has never come back to 'bite' me per se except for the fact that degreed dudes are making 25k more then me for basically the same thing. Such is not the buisness climate now however (as far as hiring) - and that paper can at least usually guarantee that when push comes to shove you can breathe a little easier - most of the time.


Good luck in whatever you decide, and to answer your original question :smilebig:, in my team of 5, we have a guy with a horticulture degree (I believe), accounting degree, a marketing major, and another dude like me thats just been in the biz for awhile. We do 'network troubleshooting' to save me the brain-ache of explaining.
 

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Guess what, a degree is a pass to get you foot in the door, most of the time you wont use 10% of wht you learned. Considering your history of getting fired because you could not even show up on time, I'm thinking your going to need all the help you can get. Stay in school just to get that piece of paper. Then find a job, any job you can learn from and get experience, and work your way from there. Like you said, thats where the real learning and markatable skills are learned. And dont worry if you hate your job, hell, I don't think I have ever like any job I have had, yet I've been at the same job I hate for 8 years. Work is work, not fun time. They get 50 hours of your time, and the rest is yours to do the things that actualy make you happy and put joy in your life. My 2 cents, YMMV.


kinkeringkong said:
I'm afraid I can't agree there, but that's only because I've only seen the engineering side of "public service".

The worst out of all my jobs was working at Public Works. Those clowns had a job that a high school drop out could have handled. I remember one of my little projects there was to catalogue the trees in the city. WTF?! Anybody could have done that. I liked my cashiering job 10 times more than that, even though the pay was considerably less.

In city/public works, it seemed like (and I was also told) that the only way to move up was to kiss ass, that or you had better know someone. Experience didn't count for much.
 

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I'm with G-Force here. Work is work. It is rare that people get to work at something they truly love and get paid for it at the same time. Not liking your job is par for the course. Find something you can do well and be paid well for. Then spend the money on something you really want to do.

I would love to be a professional motorcycle racer. But alas I am not. But I at least get to pretend to be one on track days. And those track days, bike, and parts are all paid for by my employer in the form of a paycheck to me. I don't love my job but I do love what I can do with the money it provides. :D

Remember, work to live, don't live to work.
 

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We have peeps on both sides of that up here. I am not even close to my degree field but others are right in it.

We take new hires all the time here up at Lockheed. COme on up. Cheaper than LA and not a bad drive on the weekends.

It is a job and it is experience. Nothing says ya gotta stay. Just have to be able to get a clearance.
 

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also remember that knowing what you don't want to do has value also. A lot of people wish they had tried X but had they some would have determined it was not for them. No job is perfect nor 100% fun, however if you have been to things that appeal less you can suck it up on the bad days easier
 

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kinkeringkong said:
I'm afraid I can't agree there, but that's only because I've only seen the engineering side of "public service".

The worst out of all my jobs was working at Public Works. Those clowns had a job that a high school drop out could have handled. I remember one of my little projects there was to catalogue the trees in the city. WTF?! Anybody could have done that. I liked my cashiering job 10 times more than that, even though the pay was considerably less.

In city/public works, it seemed like (and I was also told) that the only way to move up was to kiss ass, that or you had better know someone. Experience didn't count for much.
I'd put Public Works under "suck" (In my own opinion), but not all PW'ers are counting tree's. And I truly would rather "count tree's" :rotfl: than argue with some youngster at a register that he gave me a $10, not a $20.:idunno:

Anyway, Social Service positions are almost always degree required, DA's office the same. Those are kinda interesting. The courts and city government always have positions (degree required, not nec. in field).

Lockheed (like Mojave said) has positions, decent money if you can get a clearance.

The idea is to complete whatever you started. As I sit on oral boards often, conduct backgrounds and such, it speaks volumes when someone completed something (even if it was a lame ass Sally Struthers degree) vs. how it would look to me that somebody completed 90% of Sally's degree and then dropped out?

Just advice though. Look into buying "What Color Is Your Parachute". A great reference which may point you towards what you want to do, even if you don't know...
 

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I don't mean to bag on CE's (I'm an ME) but that always seemed to be the most boring job. The only way it might be fun is if you got to work on some kind of cool dam or bridge project where you're integrating power systems, or in the case of the bridge, working out all sorts of crazy loading and harmonics.

One of my roommates went to work for CalTrans with a degree in construction management (he thinks it's OK, but MAN it sounds BORING to me), they often have CEs out holding the damned stop sign. His arguments with pavers and such would leave me wondering why I took the shit job.

Another got his Environmental Engineering degree. The one with the EnvE went to work in semiconductors (at the company I work for) and long story short, after a few years left to work in wastewater, his "specialty". He basically can't stand how it's done as there's no real engineering. I think even if you somehow ended up in high tech, you could find that most jobs even there have precious little engineering involved.

Don't ever listen to someone who tells you your job is supposed to suck. Those are the people that end up bitter and drunk after work every night, with a raging mid-life crisis to go with their male pattern baldness. Some days won't be fun at any job, including racing bikes, but if your job always sucks, you need a new one. Especially someone as highly educated as you. Nobody with a MS in any type of engineering should be working a job they hate for any longer than it takes to find a new job. (Unless it pays REAL well, and you are buying REAL bitchin' toys, I mean like Ferrari bitchin')

I work in semiconductors, which I would've NEVER guessed I'd do while in school, and I can honestly tell anyone, my first 5 years out of school exceeded my wildest expectations. It's been one hell of a great ride! :thumb:

As Mojave pointed out, and you are located well for it, defense right now is booming. If you are an American Citizen (and thus can get a clearance) in this market they'd probably consider a CE for certain positions.

If you're a computer nerd, as NDD said, the rules are all their own and you are your own limit there.

No matter what, if you're close, you must finish your degree. Don't make all that time and money for naught.

If it makes you feel any better, I was real scared as a senior in college based on what little experience I had with engineering at that point. I truly wondered if I was going to hate what MEs did.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
luvtolean said:
I don't mean to bag on CE's (I'm an ME) but that always seemed to be the most boring job. The only way it might be fun is if you got to work on some kind of cool dam or bridge project where you're integrating power systems, or in the case of the bridge, working out all sorts of crazy loading and harmonics.

One of my roommates went to work for CalTrans with a degree in construction management (he thinks it's OK, but MAN it sounds BORING to me), they often have CEs out holding the damned stop sign. His arguments with pavers and such would leave me wondering why I took the shit job.

Another got his Environmental Engineering degree. The one with the EnvE went to work in semiconductors (at the company I work for) and long story short, after a few years left to work in wastewater, his "specialty". He basically can't stand how it's done as there's no real engineering. I think even if you somehow ended up in high tech, you could find that most jobs even there have precious little engineering involved.

Don't ever listen to someone who tells you your job is supposed to suck. Those are the people that end up bitter and drunk after work every night, with a raging mid-life crisis to go with their male pattern baldness. Some days won't be fun at any job, including racing bikes, but if your job always sucks, you need a new one. Especially someone as highly educated as you. Nobody with a MS in any type of engineering should be working a job they hate for any longer than it takes to find a new job. (Unless it pays REAL well, and you are buying REAL bitchin' toys, I mean like Ferrari bitchin')

I work in semiconductors, which I would've NEVER guessed I'd do while in school, and I can honestly tell anyone, my first 5 years out of school exceeded my wildest expectations. It's been one hell of a great ride! :thumb:

As Mojave pointed out, and you are located well for it, defense right now is booming. If you are an American Citizen (and thus can get a clearance) in this market they'd probably consider a CE for certain positions.

If you're a computer nerd, as NDD said, the rules are all their own and you are your own limit there.

No matter what, if you're close, you must finish your degree. Don't make all that time and money for naught.

If it makes you feel any better, I was real scared as a senior in college based on what little experience I had with engineering at that point. I truly wondered if I was going to hate what MEs did.
Most of my CE jobs have been very boring. I've worked sanitation, structural design, road maintenance, and construction. I sat around most of the time asking for work. Most of the time they gave my something stupid to do just to keep me business, nothing that had any value. The only exception was construction, it was great cause they always had something coming up and I knew what that I was helping the project in some way.

I don't think jobs should suck. A person should enjoy his work not hate it. I've walked out of 2 jobs cause they began to suck.

As far as my degree goes, I'm freaking out. I did good last quarter, but I'm really slipping up this quarter. I'm supposed to finish in June but if I can't pass 2 classes with a decent grade I will have to stay on until next year. I'm not sure I want to do that. Anyways, thanks for all the advice everyone.
 

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I'm sort of going through the same thing right now.

I just starting driving a truck (straight job, little thing to me) last week and I hate it. There's multiple things to this one job that I hate (driving in Boston, being radio dispatched...) So I'm quitting, this will be my last week there (assuming I can stop coughing and feel well enough to go back cause I've been out today and yesterday). The money was defeintly better than I was making at Autozone but I'm going back there, taking my licks and probably getting a promotion (which I think will still be less money than the truck job). The early morning hours pretty much suck but I like the rest of the job so I'll be happy for now.

I spent a year doing a job I absolutely hated (stayed there cause it bought me my 929). but I won't do it again, I'd rather have less money and be happy.

Oh yeah and I have a BA in art. its done nothing for me (except getting me crap from BDA but its all good). But as others have said in a lot of jobs just having the degree will help.

Find something you can live with for now even if its little pay (which in your case it seems it will be). get some time under your belt and continue to look for what you want to do. I can't tell you how many job interviews I went to this past summer and got none of them. Just keep trying, someone will pick you up one of these days. Each job will be a stepping stone to the next one till you find what you want.
 

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kinkeringkong said:
As far as my degree goes, I'm freaking out. I did good last quarter, but I'm really slipping up this quarter. I'm supposed to finish in June but if I can't pass 2 classes with a decent grade I will have to stay on until next year.
Dude, bear down. No excuses, finish those two classes with passable grades and get your degree!
 
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