Honda Motorcycles - FireBlades.org banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I notice it seems a lot of the riders in this forum do their own tire changing and general maintence on their bikes. Have most of you just learned by going for it or is it something someone else as sat down with you and walked you through it?

:huh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
I'm not your normal shade tree mechanic. I have a BA in Industrial Education, and used to teach Auto Tech for a number of years. The Corps taught me to fix helicopters.

Bikes are lighter, cleaner and easier than cars, and cheaper than aircraft.

My father was a mech, I have no brothers.:idunno:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12 Posts
I have never touched a bike but am about to in like an hour.
going to follow the instructions of quick 26.
if anyone can read my thread of
repsol help please. and give me further advice on what they think it is ide be very thankful.
Wish me luck guys cuz im going in.
|-_-| MEGA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
Have been a journeyman motrcycle technician for the better part of 15 years and have been wrenching bikes since I was 10 with my brothers......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
Learned the basics from my dad, I also read alot and then just go for it.

One guy showed me tyre changing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
service manual
anyone that can read and knows the basic principle of righty tighty lefty loosey and is familiar with following written instructions can do anything
on these bikes. biggest thing is the speciality tools that are sometimes needed cost more than the dealer wants to just do the work for you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
Service manuals help a lot. Also, having good quality, and the RIGHT tools is very important.

I am self-taught. I learned what I know mostly through the internet, and asking service techs from time to time. Some things I just have the dealer do even though I could do them myself...things like changing fork seals or wheel bearings.

It's really fun wrenching on your own bike, so have fun!

Just make sure that you tighten everything up to the correct torque spec before you ride again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,301 Posts
get a manual and dig in. Ive done a good deal to cars other than internal engine and transmission work I just get a manual and pay attention as to what you are doing. Ive had great success doing things myself when it comes to my bikes and cars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
just make sure you read the entire procedure first to make sure that you have any and every tool necessary
nothing worse than getting half way into something to realize that you need to order a special tool to finish
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,731 Posts
My Dad taught me to change the oil in my car when I was 17. That made changing the oil in my motorcycle, when I finally got one, no big deal. The bike I started wrenching on the most was my 'Blade, after reading good info and instructions on this site, and purchasing the service manual. I won't do engine work/valve adjustments, but most other routine stuff isn't a problem. I haven't broken too much stuff yet! :p
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,715 Posts
I'm not your normal shade tree mechanic. I have a BA in Industrial Education, and used to teach Auto Tech for a number of years. The Corps taught me to fix helicopters.

Bikes are lighter, cleaner and easier than cars, and cheaper than aircraft.

My father was a mech, I have no brothers.:idunno:
yeah but helicopters are more fun! :smilebig:

I do my own repairs and maintenance on my bike and friends bikes if they ask for help. I've worked on every aspect of automotive mechanics for the past 20 years and am a machinist by trade. I started working on bikes in 2003. Much of what mechanics and electrical is about is knowing how to troubleshoot various problems. Sure anyone can take a voltage regulator off and install a new one... BUT do they know what the root cause was that damaged the voltage regulator in the first place? R&R is good if you have the ability, but acurately troubleshooting problems is near priceless.

But I see you asked about general maintenance, not mechanical/electrical repairs. Buy a manual like they said, specific to your bike and NOT a Cylmar manual because they generally suck. Get a factory manual if you can. A pair of front and rear stands is needed too - for things like changing wheels/tires, and ajusting chain slack. They also make cleaning the wheels an easier job. If you feel uneasy about doing some portion of the maintenance after reading the manual, then it's best not to do it imo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Gotta agree with the fellas suggesting manuals. I never worked on anything before I owned a bike. I've mostly owned Hondas though, so I really haven't had to do much. I just bought a manual (Clymer, by the way) and started wrenching. Of course, that was when I was young and seemed to have oceans of time. I actually sent the bike of to the mechanic for its heli-bar installation because I just couldn't come up with the time to do it myself. Uuugh.:banghead:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Can I say "Do it Yourself". I learned fron reading reading and reading not to mension that i'm a cerified motorcycle tech and worked in an automobile shop for five years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
My Dad was a mechanical engineer. Back when I was 17 I blew my first car gearbox (mum's car) - Dad made me rebuild it. Next was the head on the same car. Have not looked back since then. Used to rebuild all my own cars when I was younger, about 6 in total - 4 cylinders through to V8's. I wont touch cars any more though.

Have done a few bikes since then. Started with an easy one - XR250 single cylinder. Then a ZXR750 in line 4 with DOHC and 16 valves. Next was a CBR600 track bike. Can pretty much turn my hand to anything now, but it's nice to still have Dad around to answer any tricky questions. Must agree though to ALWAYS BUY A SERVICE MANUAL.

Cheers,
Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Im self-taught pretty much on everything. I guess its just that I love working on things, tinkering with things. Im about to adjust my valves on my F3 and sync the carbs. It just seems 'easy' to me, not easy but just like normal I suppose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
I'm from STEEL COUNTRY USA. Grandfathers, grandmothers, aunts, uncles, cousins, dad all work in the factories and knew how to use there hands and minds for something other than the remote, "playstations", computers...

My grandfather had me fixing the lawnmower before I was in the first grade(oil, plugs, blade--including sharpening). Dad went in the USArmy and was a heavy equipment mechanic... so that trickled down to me.

And as for me... The first 2 years out of high school I was in the shipyards as a nuclear pipe welder, worked part-time with my dad as an automotive mechanic, and I am currently employed as an Mechnical Engineering/Manufacturing Technician for a high speed manufacturing facility that specializes in fuel injectors and fuel systems.

Oh, you wanted to know if I could fix anything:rotfl: :rotfl:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
I'm a licensed airframe and powerplant aircraft tech (although I dont do it for a living anymore) and am pretty much self taught on dirt and street bikes. Learned mechanics growing up through trial and error and a lot of skinned knuckles . Loved every minute of it though. Have wrenched cars, bikes and airplanes and just about anything that has a motor. Totally rebuilt my '87 GSXR 1100 myself and wished I still had it. Would definitely agree the FACTORY manual is best and the most thorough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
I work at toyota so on the weekends i just roll in there and use the work shop it makes it easy for me they have all the tools i need:hyper:
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top