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Anyone tried the Stealth sprockets or the Sidewinder sprockets??? Just wondering how they hold up or if they are worth the extra money. Also looking for suggestions on sprocket brands for this winter when I do the 520 conversion. So far all street riding, hopefully can try track days soon. Thanks
 

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Vortex......ewwww. Don't mean to dis your choice, but only their steel sprockets are worth using. The aluminum Vortex sprockets have been proven to be weaker than other sprockets. Worn sprockets damage chains too.

AFAM and RRP make really good sprockets.
 

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Sorry I don't have any 1st hand account, but I've heard stories of stealth/sidewinder sprockets going for years on dirtbikes which is a good testament of how well they might hold up.
 

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Ive had my AFAM for like 10,000 miles with no problems at all and it still looks fine. I run a AFAM on my racebike and it holds up fine on there too. My buddies go thru the VORTEX like water.
 

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running the vortex aluminum on the back right now, no problems.... i'd go with steel as a replacement though if you want more strength...all in all, vortex is fine for street use
 

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Just call AFAM USA and buy a whole kit from them, get the X-ring chain. Make sure your rear sprocket is an hard anodized aluminum it will last forever. So will the chain. If you are going to bother with doing a 520 kit you want to get the aluminum rear wait til you hold it it weighs pretty much nothing. (vortex is nice and shiny but they aren't very hard) My buddy killed a Vortex in 3 race weekends on his 100hp R6. My 130 HP ZX7 has had the AFAM for almost a season and a half!
 

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Well we will see what happens with my vortex sprockets. I have never tried them before. This is the first time for me having to change sprockets and a chain on a bike I have owned so we will see.
 

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On a 1000RR the only thing id run is Renthal or AFAM in a 520.

I run Renthal for my street, stunt and race bikes, and have no problems.

And remember, less chain lube = less wear.
 

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Yeah Saf, that doesn't make any sense to me either :)
 

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You know the answer gents, you just havent sat down and thought about it :) .

Its common practice to dump a shitload of lubricant onto the chain, with the intent its going to reduce wear between chains and sprockets. In actual fact, you only lubricate the outer surface of the rollers on our sealed chains, really we want to be removing a chain every 5000kms and boiling in a oil/lubricant suited for chains.

However, what happens is this. At some point when your turning right, there is a direct line of sight between the front wheel and the chain, and if you have ever been on a group ride you will know how much sand and grit a warm pilot power, super corsa etc can pick up, and it does the same for this. It will stand on, and then flick up dirt, sand, insects **** of all sorts and fling it straight at the chain. At what point you have three types of people.

The ones who dont lubricate a chain. The dirt will hit the chain and fall off.
The ones who lubricate just enuf, where it has a 50/50 chance to stick.
The ones who believe that Honda put them chain guards on there so it doesnt flick up raw crude oil and hit the back of your lid when your leaning hard into a left hander. This last one, picks up EVERYTHING. Think of fly paper, and flies.

For the first person, he and his dry chain will get hot, the friction warms up the chain too much, the chain will loose its internal grease, will wear pin to pin (even a points of millimeters, when you times that 105 links, add up to a lot of wear) and wear the sprockets down, not to mention push the teeth other as it (chain) comes off the tooth to head towards the other sprocket. It will however pick up little to no dirt, but the point is kinda moot when you have destroyed a chain, in turn destroyed sprockets.

The second scenario, is one that will lubricate a chain across its rolling path, meaning the side links can be 100% dry of lube (a light film of RP7, WD40 etc to stop rust) and you only spray a qu8ick 2 rotations of the chain. Start at link, spin once, twice, stop when you pass the link the 2nd time. Thats enuf. It will unload the sprocket off the chain, lubricate the rollers, and not be thick enuf between the sideplates and so forth to collect all that garbage on the road.

The third scenario, people just pour it in, and each time the wheel lines up with the chain, everything sticks to it. Sand is a great medium for wearing items down. We blast it with air to remove paint (well that and garnet), we also use it to remove a finish. It will also take a rough surface and wear it down so much and so fine, you can polish it to a mirror. This is ALL over the road. The gets all over the chain, gets between the side plates, wears the o-rings, gets on the rollers, pitts the surface of the roller, in turn breaking down the surface of the sprockets, and causing a lot of wear.

Ever noticed on a bike with quite a few kms, how much junk is built up around the countershaft sprocket ?. Its flung off the street, onto the chain, it then does its tightest radius around the front sprocket and flicks off. Over time it becomes a sold mass of black filthy garbage, that acts as a chain buffer of crap.

Anyways, i have found the less is more method to be better on all my bikes and my customer bikes. The same theory applies in MX chains, and while i know were not mx, the theory and the wear is the same, and we both run steel/ally sprockets, so its quite simmilar in wear patterns. We race on those nearly dry, because we dont have o-rings to keep happy.

The first mods i do on my bikes, chain guards go off, its all cleaned, and kept clean. I get all my chains off DID for free, but im the one who also looks after them and conserves them to get the best out of em. Go figure.
 

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Okay, I'll agree with this to a small degree. I lube my chains a lot and get plenty of mileage. It is certainly more important to clean a dirty chain than to simply lube the grinding paste that's already on it but I haven't experienced the sort of sand and such you refer to on a chain myself. Chains spin way too fast for anything to be able to stay on it for any significant length of time even when you're riding on gravel or dirt roads.
The junk built up in the sprocket cover is flung there because the chain is spinning so fast - the same is happening at the rear sprocket - not much usually stays on the chain long enough to do much damage.
 

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Ive seen it too consistently, firstly in 89 at Suzuki North the then head mechanic Gazza and i had this convo .. it was a interesting point, and was also quite honestly true when we saw the bikes come back some months later , and again and again for servicing, the pattern was too obvious.

Again with customers sport bikes over the years, a cleaner less lubed chain was always in better cond than others who thought they were doing the right thing.

As far as sand on the road, you dont see it, but its there when you look. take a air compressor, and run it across the road and you will notice you can see a distinct darker patch where you sprayed.
 
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