Honda Motorcycles - FireBlades.org banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am looking to upgrade my brake lines this winter and I read somewhere that it is not recommended to run stainless steel lines on the rear brake due to something about pulsating from the rear under hard braking and the non braided lines allow expansion when this pulsing occurs. Putting SS lines in wont allow expansion and can lead to problems. I do not remember exactly what the problems were or what the pulsing was, but has anyone ever heard this before?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
I am looking to upgrade my brake lines this winter and I read somewhere that it is not recommended to run stainless steel lines on the rear brake due to something about pulsating from the rear under hard braking and the non braided lines allow expansion when this pulsing occurs. Putting SS lines in wont allow expansion and can lead to problems. I do not remember exactly what the problems were or what the pulsing was, but has anyone ever heard this before?
I never heard this before and by a mechanical standpoint makes no sense especially how much a rear brake is used on a bike. I have ss braided and have had no problems in 10+ years. But i can not give insite on that comment maybe someone else can if thats the case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Found it.
http://www.fireblades.org/forums/aftermarket-perfomance-parts-reviews/72862-braided-brake-lines-they-worth.html


"Hi,
Since Al washers are uncommon where I live, I don't like Ti banjo bolts (they breaks easily while tightening cooper washers, if you got a matter to reassembly the lines/master cylinder).
Secondly I would not advice to use braided line for rear brake. I got one exploded under hard braking, because of high pressure pulsation, while rear wheel is jumping under the hard breaking. I like rear brake stock line capability to expand/absorb those pulses.
Just my 2cnt."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
560 Posts
"since Al washers are uncommon where I live, I don't like Ti banjo bolts (they breaks easily while tightening cooper washers...."

reads a bit like ->


I personally wouldn't take tech advise from that guy.
 

·
President: Team Full Chat
Joined
·
7,572 Posts
Sounds like complete poppycock to me:rotfl: I've had regular lines, Goodridge lines, HEL (currently) and Kevlar lines (specifically on the rear of my original 900). All without any operational issue whatsoever. I've designed my own lengths and custom set ups on a few different bikes. Granted I've never been on a track so I can't comment on that, but I've heard and read that the rear brakes are RARELY used if ever on the track. I would give the comments in that thread in regards to your concern no credit. Especially for street use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,455 Posts
I've had both on my RC51, I could hardly tell the difference. Placebo?
I did end up adjusting the angle of my brake lever so that I have to extend my ankle a little beyond comfort in order to lock the rear tire so as to avoid that possibility. That way, I can easily cover the rear brake a tiny bit with out worrying too much about using to much brake. If that makes sense.
Had the steel line on for 3+ years now.


Since they're so rare, I wonder what a standard crush washer goes for on the black market in Rhode Island?
I know a guy who knows a guy whose sister's husband has a line on them. :eyebrows:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,504 Posts
I don't see how people break banjo bolts, they are only tightened to something like 14 ft lbs., and if aluminum banjo bolts don't break when properly tightened, I wonder how much force was used to break Ti banjo bolts... :idunno:


Ian, here is another teaser, Spiegler line and Ti bolts :D
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,455 Posts
I don't understand why on earth one would want Ti banjo washers anyway.
The aluminum is soft and acts like a rubberwasher to seal between the fittings and the bolt.
Does Ti do that? I was under the impression the answer would be a resounding no. :idunno:
 

·
President: Team Full Chat
Joined
·
7,572 Posts
I don't see how people break banjo bolts, they are only tightened to something like 14 ft lbs., and if aluminum banjo bolts don't break when properly tightened, I wonder how much force was used to break Ti banjo bolts... :idunno:


Ian, here is another teaser, Spiegler line and Ti bolts :D
:drool: :drool: I'm gonna get dry mouth from all this drooling. :crap:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,504 Posts
I don't understand why on earth one would want Ti banjo washers anyway.
The aluminum is soft and acts like a rubberwasher to seal between the fittings and the bolt.
Does Ti do that? I was under the impression the answer would be a resounding no. :idunno:
I don't see where he is talking about Ti washers, but yeah, I would stick with aluminum or copper washers there. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,455 Posts
Found it.
http://www.fireblades.org/forums/aftermarket-perfomance-parts-reviews/72862-braided-brake-lines-they-worth.html


"Hi,
Since Al washers are uncommon where I live, I don't like Ti banjo bolts (they breaks easily while tightening cooper washers, if you got a matter to reassembly the lines/master cylinder).
Secondly I would not advice to use braided line for rear brake. I got one exploded under hard braking, because of high pressure pulsation, while rear wheel is jumping under the hard breaking. I like rear brake stock line capability to expand/absorb those pulses.
Just my 2cnt."
Mikeo, this is where I got confused.
You're right - he didn't say anything about Ti washers afterall. My bad. :O
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I don't see how people break banjo bolts, they are only tightened to something like 14 ft lbs., and if aluminum banjo bolts don't break when properly tightened, I wonder how much force was used to break Ti banjo bolts... :idunno:


Ian, here is another teaser, Spiegler line and Ti bolts :D
I think you'll find on Hondas it's more like 25 lb/ft
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,504 Posts

·
President: Team Full Chat
Joined
·
7,572 Posts
To try and clarify here I think we're are comparing steel to aluminum. In my experience with aluminum banjos and aluminum bolts, 14-16 ftlbs were recommended as maximum torque. Steel bolts and banjos were increased to a maximum of 24 ft lbs. OEM steel for Honda's in the manual calls for 25 ft lbs. I wouldn't sweat 1 ft lbs on the steels. But for aluminum bolts I would stick to the max of 14. You don't want to stretch those hollowed out, thin walled aluminum bolts or risk snapping the head off. My HEL lines recommend 14 as minimum and 24 as maximum. They are steel. And they (HEL) try to deter you from aluminum for a number of reasons. I never had any issues in the past with aluminum, except for fading anodization. I don't mess around with my brake lines, I go to the recommended max for peace of mind and no leaks.

As for Titanium bolts? I'll never know:rotfl: But I would imagine it would be tough to snap one even at 25 ftlbs. Unless they're poorly made. There's Doohans 2 cents worth of nothing:thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I was just trying to make the point, maybe unsuccessfully, that the higher torque figure in the workshop manual (25 lb/ft) is for steel banjo bolts and steel sealing washers and if people were using this torque figure for banjo bolts made of some other material then that could be the reason for them snapping.

That's all.
 

·
President: Team Full Chat
Joined
·
7,572 Posts
I was just trying to make the point, maybe unsuccessfully, that the higher torque figure in the workshop manual (25 lb/ft) is for steel banjo bolts and steel sealing washers and if people were using this torque figure for banjo bolts made of some other material then that could be the reason for them snapping.

That's all.
I think we're all on the same page. :)
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top