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I just finished watching a National Geographic show on Kangaroo's. The show focused on the 'roo population in Angelslea, Victoria. Those buggers are everywhere! Or so it seems. So to my fellow riders down under- tell me about these incredible animals. I understand that opinions are mostly polar- some would like to see them eliminated while others want them untouched. What must it be like to ride a bike with these guys hopping all over the bloody roads. It was well documented that many 'roos meet their end after encounters with cars and trucks, but a biker would likely have as bad a result as the 'roo. Are they as big an issue as the show may have led me to believe, or is it like here in Canada, where animals on the road are just another sometime hazard to be on the lookout for. In the mostly frozen north here, we are very envious of our Aussie friends who can ride 12 months of the year, but with all those 'roos I'm not so sure! What's the real truth? Thanks
 

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I just finished watching a National Geographic show on Kangaroo's. The show focused on the 'roo population in Angelslea, Victoria. Those buggers are everywhere! Or so it seems. So to my fellow riders down under- tell me about these incredible animals. I understand that opinions are mostly polar- some would like to see them eliminated while others want them untouched. What must it be like to ride a bike with these guys hopping all over the bloody roads. It was well documented that many 'roos meet their end after encounters with cars and trucks, but a biker would likely have as bad a result as the 'roo. Are they as big an issue as the show may have led me to believe, or is it like here in Canada, where animals on the road are just another sometime hazard to be on the lookout for. In the mostly frozen north here, we are very envious of our Aussie friends who can ride 12 months of the year, but with all those 'roos I'm not so sure! What's the real truth? Thanks
I've hit a number of roos in cars but thankfully not on a bike...yet, although I have had some very close calls.
They are often found on the roads after showers to drink the water that pools. During a long dry spell (I think it was late '04) we had a couple of days of rain out on the Nullabor and they flocked to the highway for the water. We did about 90km at near walking pace maneuving through the carnage of hundreds (if not thousands) of dead roos cleaned up by trucks during the night. Very, very sad. Even hitting dead ones can make a mess of a car. Yes, roos are definately something to be aware of and we even get them in the suburbs occasionally. They jump so high it's pretty much impossible to fence them out of public areas. A number of golf courses here have fairly large roo populations as well.
The messiest corpse I've seen on the road was a camel pulped by a semi. I don't know how much blood they hold but this one bled out all of it.
Up in the Kimberley I had several close calls with cattle during the night as many properties were not fenced along the highway.
 

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I dont think anyone wants to see them wiped out.
Sure cull them in some areas (and sell them for food, skins) but it wouldnt be Australia if we got rid of most of them. Heck you can even find some inside Sydney (a city of several million people)

The big difference between roos and most animals in terms of getting hit - most animals tend to be on the road and get startled and freeze then get hit. Roos tend to actually jump into the path of the vehicle or even into the side of the vehicle. They dont seem to comprehend vehicles at all.

You are far more likely to hit one at night or late/early in the day.
So its not a bad idea to not drive/ride in country areas at those times.

Ive hit 2 with a car and been in convoys that have hit quite a few (including the 5th car in the convoy being hit on the side by a roo!)

There are plenty of other things you need to watch for.
Wombats are slowish and quite solid - they are like a half keg!
Emus can be a pain, especially since they tend to be in groups.
Depending on where you are you can also run into problems of wild imports - deer, horses, camels, goats (had close calls with all of those!)
And of cause sheep and cattle.

But the most dangerous is the drunk!
 

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1230am coming through the clare valley in South Australia it was literally dodge the roo every 10 m. They just didn't care..........
Had one jump in to me as i was driving a bus, well the bus was stopped and it literally jumped straight into it........
Wombats cost me 2 1/2 grand damage in my ute when i hit one an hour and a half out of sydney, came under the guard rail and hit the drivers front of my ute at 110 kmh, on a side note Holden utes can fly on occasion.......
 
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