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You're welcome. :eyebrows:



Ditto on the thanks and warm wishes. Keep up the good work, people! :clap:
 

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Baketech said:
Fogey.....

Ever been here....American Cemetery - Cambridge

Very sobering place..... :crap:
Thanks, Baketech. No, I haven't been there. It'll be a nice ride from me for a winter's Sunday sometime. I've been to several of the WW1 and WW2 cemeteries in France and they are humbling places when you are faced by the reality of the numbers of young men killed.
 

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oldfogey said:
Thanks, Baketech. No, I haven't been there. It'll be a nice ride from me for a winter's Sunday sometime. I've been to several of the WW1 and WW2 cemeteries in France and they are humbling places when you are faced by the reality of the numbers of young men killed.
I have some family in Cambridge, so I have enjoyed the opportunity to pay respect at the American Cemetery, as well as the memorial at Duxford...... :(
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
oldfogey said:
From a UK perspective the day after Remembrance day, this is worth reading:

http://www.samizdata.net/blog/archives/cat_military_affairs.html
That was a good read - thanks, fogey!

An excerpt from one of the posts there:

Any lingering doubts...
Robert Clayton Dean (Texas USA) Military affairs
(3) (28)
...about my manhood have just been reinforced. And how:

Perez, 21, lost his leg to a roadside bomb in Iraq more than a year ago, but despite the phantom pains that haunt him, he says he is determined to prove to the Army that he is no less of a man - and no less of a soldier.
"I'm not ready to get out yet," he says. "I'm not going to let this little injury stop me from what I want to do."

Perez is one of at least four amputees from the 82nd Airborne Division to re-enlist. With a new carbon-fiber prosthetic leg, Perez intends to show a medical board he can run an eight-minute mile, jump out of airplanes and pass all the other paratrooper tests that will allow him to go with his regiment to Afghanistan next year

When he arrived at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C., for his rehabilitation, Perez asked a pair of generals who visited his bedside if it was possible for him to stay in the Army.

"They told me, 'It's all up to you, how much you want it'," he says. "If I could do everything like a regular soldier, I could stay in."

He wasted little time getting started. At one point, a visitor found him doing push-ups in bed. He trained himself to walk normally with his new leg, and then run with it.

Perez has to rise at least an hour earlier than his fellow soldiers to allow swelling from the previous day's training to subside enough for his stump to fit into the prosthetic.



I am glad he is on my side.
Link to news article about Spc. Perez

:clap:
 

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Baketech said:
I have some family in Cambridge, so I have enjoyed the opportunity to pay respect at the American Cemetery, as well as the memorial at Duxford...... :(
The one at Duxford was pretty moving. All of those dead aircrewmen....


So many young men (of all nations) dead because of some crazy politician. :(
 

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I've visited Duxford, as you say a great memorial for US flyers. It's also a fabulous aircraft museum for those of us who enjoy seeing live the great mechanical progress of the last century. When last there I saw a mustang, a spitfire, a B52 and a Lancaster flying together. It gives another dimension to that memorial.
 

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Many of you have probably heard this before (especially the Aussies), and to those of you who haven't, read the words carefully. It's a special tune this time of year, but sends chills through me no matter when I hear it.

********************************************************

When I was a young man I carried my pack,
And I lived the free life of a rover.
From the Murrays Green Basin to the dusty outback,
I waltzed my Matilda all over.
Then in nineteen-fifteen my country said "Son,
It’s time to stop rambling ’cause there’s work to be done",
So they gave me a tin hat, and they gave me a gun,
And they sent me away to the war.

And the band played Waltzing Matilda,
As we sailed away from the quay.
And amidst all the tears, and the shouts, and the cheers,
We sailed off to Gallipoli.

How well I remember that terrible day,
When the blood stained the sand and the water.
And how in that hell that they called Suvla Bay,
We were butchered like lambs at the slaughter.
Johnny Turk he was ready, he primed himself well,
He showered us with bullets, and he rained us with shells.
And in five minutes flat we were all blown to hell,
Nearly blew us back home to Australia.

But the band played Waltzing Matilda,
As we stopped to bury our slain.
We buried ours, and the Turks buried theirs,
Then we started all over again.

Now those who were living, just tried to survive,
In that mad world of blood, death and fire.
And for seven, weary weeks, I kept myself alive,
While the corpses around me piled higher.
Then a big Turkish shell, knocked me arse over head,
And when I awoke, in me hospital bed,
And saw what it had done, Christ, I wished I was dead,
Never knew there were worse things than dying.

And no more I’ll go Waltzing Matilda,
All around the green bushe, far and near.
For to hump tent and pegs, a man needs two legs.
No more waltzing matilda for me.

So they collected the cripples, the wounded, the maimed,
And they shipped us back home to Australia.
The legless, the armless, the blind, the insane,
Those proud wounded heroes of Suvla.
And as our ship pulled into Circular Quay,
I looked at the place where me legs, used to be,
I thanked Christ, there was no-one there waiting for me,
To grieve, to mourn, and to pity.

And the band played Waltzing Matilda,
As they carried us down the gangway.
But nobody cheered, they just stood there and stared,
And they turned all their faces away.

Now every April I sit on my porch,
And I watch the parade pass before me.
I see my old comrades, how proudly they march,
Reliving their dreams of past glory.
The old men march slowly, all bent, stiff and sore,
The forgotten heroes, of a forgotten war.
And the young people ask,
"What are they arching for?"
And I ask myself the same question.

And the band played Waltzing Matilda,
And the old men still answer the call.
But year after year, their numbers get fewer,
Some day no one will march there at all.

Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda,
Who’ll go a-Waltzing Matilda with me?
And their ghosts, may be heard, as you pass by the Billabong.
Who'll go a-waltzing Matilda with me?

*********************************************************

RIP, and thank you.
 

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oldfogey said:
I've visited Duxford, as you say a great memorial for US flyers. It's also a fabulous aircraft museum for those of us who enjoy seeing live the great mechanical progress of the last century. When last there I saw a mustang, a spitfire, a B52 and a Lancaster flying together. It gives another dimension to that memorial.
That place is amazing....truly a "living" museum. Saw a lot of flyers on my last trip including a Spit, 51D, and of all things...a Bleriot.... :thumb:

Got to watch a lot of armor crawling around in the dirt as well.... :eyebrows:
 

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Baketech said:
Got to watch a lot of armor crawling around in the dirt as well.... :eyebrows:
Yeah, that was pretty cool. I didn't realize they had that until I was there.

Bovington next time I'm over there. :thumb:
 
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Spent a week with the Royal Armoured Corps at Bovington on a Fighting Vehicle design course. Got to play with some of the toys of the time, Scorpion, FV432, Chieftain, Challenger. Much respecto for the tank regiments. Very scary things even when you're on the inside.

Highlight of the week was a guided tour of the museum by a Colonel Woodhouse. Detailed, in depth knowledge of the technical aspects of all that was there. Great stuff. I remember him saying "Leopard 1, useless thing, as much protection as a paper bag. Shoot holes straight through it with a machine gun". Comment about the M1 "Good vehicle provided you've got an armoured fuel tanker following you about".

At the firing range at Lulworth Cove, the exhibits of armour penetrating shells and the damage they do were pretty eye opening too. 12" of armour, HEAT shell put a hole straight through it.
 

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APTZ said:
Comment about the M1 "Good vehicle provided you've got an armoured fuel tanker following you about".
This is widely considered to be the "skinny" as to why we did not press on in Iraq during the 1st Gulf War. Outran our own supply lines...situation was precarious....

APTZ said:
At the firing range at Lulworth Cove, the exhibits of armour penetrating shells and the damage they do were pretty eye opening too. 12" of armour, HEAT shell put a hole straight through it.
We have a range nearby that does such testing....I can hear these shells almost 20 miles away. The pieces of pierced plate look like modern art....crazy plastic flow... :eek:
 
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