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I use the Portable tire changer and motorcycle attachment from Harbor Freight. If there is one close to your house go there, because it is cheaper than online. I paid $25.99 for the changer, and $19.99 for the motorcycle attachment. I would also recommend 2 to 4 tire irons and a wheel balancing kit. I use a homemade balancer, so I can't help you there. Tire changer and Motorcycle changer
 

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How much are balancing kits and where would you find one?
 

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I use the Tirequik balancer too.

Got my tire machine from Wikco for less than $400 delivered. Easy enough to get the rubber off of the rim but I don't have the knack of getting the last bit of the 2nd bead back on. That's on my 'to do' list for the winter.
 

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Bought the tire changer from Wicko also. save yor money and buy the one from Harbor tool. Wish I would have seen the changer at Harbor tool first, looks indenical to the Wicko machine.Build your own balancer. i bought the expensive balancer after making my own, thouhgt it would be better, another waste of money.My home made one worked just as good as the expensive one. just my 2 cents.
 

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oldgoat : Bought the tire changer from Wicko also. save yor money and buy the one from Harbor tool. Wish I would have seen the changer at Harbor tool first, looks indenical to the Wicko machine.Build your own balancer. i bought the expensive balancer after making my own, thouhgt it would be better, another waste of money.My home made one worked just as good as the expensive one. just my 2 cents.
Got any pics of your homemade balancer? I tried to make one using some caster wheels (w/o bearings) but with the weight of the wheel it doesn't roll. So I've just been using a rod from the changer and my rear stand. It works ok but not as good as I would like.
 

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Changing and balancing.
Is this something that can be done with minimal amount of mechanical ability? Safely? I don't want to pay between $50 and $80 per tire everytime I need new rubber.
 

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02FBlade : I tried to make one using some caster wheels (w/o bearings) but with the weight of the wheel it doesn't roll.
Buy a set of rollerblade bearings...the type without dust seals.... they work great...
 

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Baketech : Quote (02FBlade @ Oct. 16 2003, 6:33pm)I tried to make one using some caster wheels (w/o bearings) but with the weight of the wheel it doesn't roll.
Buy a set of rollerblade bearings...the type without dust seals.... they work great...
Yeah, get the ABEC-5 rated ones.
 

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02FBlade : Quote (oldgoat @ Oct. 16 2003, 5:31pm)Bought the tire changer from Wicko also. save yor money and buy the one from Harbor tool. Wish I would have seen the changer at Harbor tool first, looks indenical to the Wicko machine.Build your own balancer. i bought the expensive balancer after making my own, thouhgt it would be better, another waste of money.My home made one worked just as good as the expensive one. just my 2 cents.
Got any pics of your homemade balancer? I tried to make one using some caster wheels (w/o bearings) but with the weight of the wheel it doesn't roll. So I've just been using a rod from the changer and my rear stand.  It works ok but not as good as I would like.
Latest version available at: http://www.clarity.net/~adam/tire-changing-doc.html.

try this link a lot of good infor for the do it yourselfer
 

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I picked up a big ol' tire changer from America's Tire Company for $200.  It's pneumatic powered and awesome.

Made my own static balancer with some 2X4s and 1/2' bar stock.  Cost me $5 or so.

CBRSHO, if you have the right equipment, and removing your own wheels is a pretty easy task for you, changing your tires should not be too bad. What you need to realize is there is a tremendous amount of force involved in changing tires, both in de-mounting and mounting, as well as breaking and seating the beads. If you make an error and apply the force at the wrong time, in the wrong direction, or apply too much force, bad things can happen.

I watched at the guys who were changing my tires at the tire shops, and decided that I was just as capable as they were, and probably a little bit smarter. So, I got the equipment, asked a lot of advice and went for it. I've long since lost count of how many tires I've changed, and never had a problem.
 

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HondaGal : Easy enough to get the rubber off of the rim but I don't have the knack of getting the last bit of the 2nd bead back on.  That's on my 'to do' list for the winter.
This is not as hard as it first may seem. I usually have a friend assist. Put on lots of soapy water (dishwashing liquid and water works good), and start working around the tire with tire irons until it gets hard. At this point, push down on the tire 180 degrees from the tire irons until the tire bead goes into the center of the rim (this gives you more clearance as the rim is deeper there). I continue to repeatedly push on the tire until the bead is all the way into the center, then it is easy to use the tire irons to finish the job. I also find that putting pressure on the tire with the tire irons while pushing in the tire bead keeps the tire from popping out of the center of the rim. In a nut shell, you will know if you have done it right if the last bit of tire to seat is only about 6-8 inches. If it is larger, push down on the tire 180 degrees out to gain clearance.
 

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Joel : I picked up a big ol' tire changer from America's Tire Company for $200.  It's pneumatic powered and awesome.
How did you manage that? Were they selling an old one? Man.. that's an interesting idea to look for old equipment that is still usable. Hm.. time to scan the local classified ads.
 

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Holeshot : Quote (Joel @ Oct. 25 2003, 11:19pm)I picked up a big ol' tire changer from America's Tire Company for $200.  It's pneumatic powered and awesome.
How did you manage that?  Were they selling an old one?  Man.. that's an interesting idea to look for old equipment that is still usable.  Hm.. time to scan the local classified ads.
Holeshot, I happen to know one of the district reps. What I'd suggest is you simply go to some tire stores and ask to speak with the service manager. Tell them what you're planing on doing and what you're looking for. They will realize you're not going to be any compettition to them, and if you find a reasonable manager, you may get lucky.

And you're right, it was an old one. With the amount of tires they mount and demount they can't afford to wait until the machines completely die, so they put them out to pasture, so to speak. For me, I use the thing every few months, and I'm sure it will last me many years to come.
 

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