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Discussion Starter #1
I’ve seen this debated so many times that I felt it would be right to just drop my story.

Let’s start from the beginning, my father from Southeast China came out in the 1990’s. He always envied riding in China and out, family never had money to buy any motor vehicles. So he came out to USA to look for jobs, where he found one in the Midwest and went through promotions and eventually took over a restaurant. That kept him busy up to 2000. Where after I was born, he had enough money saved up for a brand new motorcycle. Shopped around and found a CBR 954RR, bought it not knowing the power or what the capabilities were. Or in his words “because it looked cool”. He got a permit thereafter and started riding, put down a total of 800 miles in 10 years.

This is what I found very interesting, he never knew the cc’s, never really ever took it up on one wheel. Only did 2 long highway trips adding up to 240 miles on her. Nor did he speed and push the bike at all.
He got a Honda shadow 600 in 2012 and the 954 was set into storage. was never taken out again till 2018.

Now this is what I have never heard any stories of. Father and son starting on a 1000cc. I turned 16 in 2018. Having ridden 8 years on a Pw50, crf110, and yz125 in my neighborhood. I took the leap, a IDOT(msf course) and got my permit, rode a rebel in the msf. Then set down around 15 hours on my buddies 636, and got my license with only around 20 hours total in the saddle.

After that in the fall I learned to ride a CBR 954rr, with full gear, (helmet, jacket, gloves, and riding boots). In 2019 I put down 300 miles, all of which really did show the power of the bike / scare the s**t out of me. A accidental twist could bring up the bike in 4th gear. Highway speeds can be ridden in first gear, there was a major learn curve just riding from a 600 to a 954. The power is all over, there is not one gear that you can’t accidentally wheelie or slide out. Now I am 18, and my season for this year is almost over, with the fuel issues due to improper storage, as you can see with my previous post. I feel it’s just something that I can set down as a statistic in the books for 2 family members starting on a 1000. It is a very disheartening experience, if that is a good explanation.
Each time you start that bike up and take off, personally I get tense trying to make sure there are no mistakes made. Just like my father, I can’t get myself to really push the bike. Each turn you go into, always has second thoughts. I can say having crashed on my dirtbike more times than I can count on all my fingers and toes. It really set you into place with how much power a 1000 has. When you ride it just grips the ground, and always wants to go. And add that little bit of throttle you realize your going 90 in a 45, now imagine you turn a blind corner going at that speed and a car in front of you is going 45 blocking the road with no escape paths you crash. I feel that’s the danger of a 1000. (Overconfidence, rider mistakes, and the ego)

I would never recommend it to anyone that is riding with a Immature mindset, to show off, or to push the bike. I can only recommend this to someone that is looking to cruise and can really honestly control themselves.

People have done it, and I know people will continue to, but I feel as someone that has started on one. Take the msf, and at least take time in a empty road or a parking lot. It’s better to drop it going 5 mph there than out on the roads. I have dropped this bike once on the left side, and itself has been dropped 3 times total. All at the same driveway, twice by my father and once by me. It will happen when you ride and if you get a bike like a 1000 to last - it will hurt.
 

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A long read, and I don't want to be critical, but talking of 'an accidental twist could bring up the bike in 4th gear' and '. . . there is not one gear that you can’t accidentally wheelie or slide out,' can not be considered 'accidental' but created by effort or inexperience. Coming from the range of bikes you mention, all the way up to the 636, should mean that you have learnt a lot about throttle control. It is the very essence of riding!

It is great that you have 'inherited' the bike from your dad, and I have read your other post and pleased to see yet another one of these fine bikes recovered and ridden. Shame it's been dropped three times, and I might differ on your statement that 'it will happen when you ride and if you get a bike like a 1000 to last.' Again, experience determines how we move our bikes, put them on paddock stands, etc, etc. Sure, many will tell stories of dropping bikes in a driveway, but my view is that it's from either carelessness or over confidence.

You do carry a good message though, about being cautious when upgrading to a higher powered bike. This has been a problem since the early- to mid-seventies. I know there were high capacity bikes before that, but we're generally talking British low power Triumph/BSA and USA's Harleys. The seventies was a time when you could go from a 125 to a high-performance two-stroke; anything from the Suzuki/Yamaha/Kawasaki 250 all the way up to Kawasaki's Mach 111 H1:
108736


Now, of course, such progression is regulated.

Still, both power and weight management of the 1000cc bikes is something to be wary of and should be anticipated by those first stepping on. My view is that we all want to explore our bike's potential. I still do, and I've been licenced for 52 years and now have a collection of 12 bikes - 10 of them 1,000cc, including the new 2020 RR-R SP. BUT, there is no 'accidental' twist of the wrist. We set out to explore, to test, to satisfy curiosity and the driver of all that is our right wrist.

We must accept both responsibility and consequences of that.(y)

108737
 

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Discussion Starter #4
A long read, and I don't want to be critical, but talking of 'an accidental twist could bring up the bike in 4th gear' and '. . . there is not one gear that you can’t accidentally wheelie or slide out,' can not be considered 'accidental' but created by effort or inexperience. Coming from the range of bikes you mention, all the way up to the 636, should mean that you have learnt a lot about throttle control. It is the very essence of riding!

It is great that you have 'inherited' the bike from your dad, and I have read your other post and pleased to see yet another one of these fine bikes recovered and ridden. Shame it's been dropped three times, and I might differ on your statement that 'it will happen when you ride and if you get a bike like a 1000 to last.' Again, experience determines how we move our bikes, put them on paddock stands, etc, etc. Sure, many will tell stories of dropping bikes in a driveway, but my view is that it's from either carelessness or over confidence.

You do carry a good message though, about being cautious when upgrading to a higher powered bike. This has been a problem since the early- to mid-seventies. I know there were high capacity bikes before that, but we're generally talking British low power Triumph/BSA and USA's Harleys. The seventies was a time when you could go from a 125 to a high-performance two-stroke; anything from the Suzuki/Yamaha/Kawasaki 250 all the way up to Kawasaki's Mach 111 H1:
View attachment 108736

Now, of course, such progression is regulated.

Still, both power and weight management of the 1000cc bikes is something to be wary of and should be anticipated by those first stepping on. My view is that we all want to explore our bike's potential. I still do, and I've been licenced for 52 years and now have a collection of 12 bikes - 10 of them 1,000cc, including the new 2020 RR-R SP. BUT, there is no 'accidental' twist of the wrist. We set out to explore, to test, to satisfy curiosity and the driver of all that is our right wrist.

We must accept both responsibility and consequences of that.(y)

View attachment 108737
I really appreciate the time you took to read it. Let me explain, I only had 5 hours on the saddle in msf and took a written exam for a permit. Then before I took the jump and just got on a 954 and try to pass the licensing test. I had a buddy that offered to use his 636 before he turned it into a stunt bike. So I got around 15 hours on that bike. I am explaining that with a 1000 even with traction control. If you start - it will wheelie in 4th and it can low side without a steady and smooth throttle hand. The bike has never been crashed, only dropped which just ruins the farings a bit. It’s a standstill drop, where you learn to move a bike and you lose your balance causes the drop. I consider myself starting on a 954, as I never really put miles on a different bike, so yes it’s extremely dangerous and it needs to be treaded carefully in words. The power of these bikes are massive, I’m sure if my father had gotten a F4i I would be pushing the bike a bit more. But regardless I rarely even use any of the power it offers. It really is a responsibility and has benefits and consequences. Hopefully in the future I can really get to understand the 954, if not I’ll likely be getting a cbr600rr or even a Yamaha mt09 in 2 years.
I love the look of that new Honda Rr-R
 

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Hi.

I took seven lessons before i got my permit back in 1997. My first bike was a CBR919RR year 96 and i had no problem to adjust with power of bike.
Took it easy first miles and then full power. Have had around 4-5 near to death on roads during my time and thats why i pretty much only do Track Days now with the bike.
I can recommend Track Day since you learn to handle your bike and what it is capable of and in Sweden we always have instructors that help you if you want to be a better driver.
I only had a moped before my first bike.
 

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Interesting thread. Agree with Stonemountain that trackdays are the best and safest way of learning where the limits are of your bike. But even then, it can be misleading as most tracks (when dry) have more grip and less debris than the average road. It's always a combination of the bike and the road, and that just needs experience to be able to judge where the grey zone begins. We all have different ideas of how far we want to go into the grey zone, and for those of us without traction control, the though of a highside is enough to keep us conservative with the gas when exiting corners. I almost learnt the hard way how easy it is to highside, while doing a trackday at Assen, when I gave too much gas coming out of Meeuwenmeer and got thrown into the air at about 130mph when the rear hooked up again after instantly spinning up because of a dip I had forgotten. Fortunately I managed to hang on and got back in the saddle, but it was a valuable lesson. If you listen to the various statistics about how dangerous bikes are, you'll hear that most solitary accidents are due to people not making it round bends. I believe a large proportion of that is because people don't believe the bike can lean over as far as needed to get round at that speed, and do the instinctive thing of putting the brakes on, which is about the worst you can do. Usually the bike can far exceed the limits of the rider, but you have to know when the limits are imposed by road conditions and adapt your riding to suit. That's what takes years of experience - but you have to be prepared to explore the limits and build up your database. You don't do that by wearing fluorescent yellow everything and riding everywhere vertical.
And of course there is the astonishing acceleration of these bikes. That's a lot easier to get used to, but we have to remember that our braking performance is only about as good as cars. Whose drivers we can assume are blind and deaf, so yes, driving at 90 in a 30 is not recommended. That's where the other statistic comes in, where bikers are knocked off by cars coming in from a side road who "didn't see ya mate" . Wholeheartedly agree with Nigelrb.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hi.

I took seven lessons before i got my permit back in 1997. My first bike was a CBR919RR year 96 and i had no problem to adjust with power of bike.
Took it easy first miles and then full power. Have had around 4-5 near to death on roads during my time and thats why i pretty much only do Track Days now with the bike.
I can recommend Track Day since you learn to handle your bike and what it is capable of and in Sweden we always have instructors that help you if you want to be a better driver.
I only had a moped before my first bike.
I did ride dirt, and I did take the msf before I got my license. So I gotcha, the power only goes as far as you turn the throttle on these older fireblades. It’s all you and the road, for sure. People who push their bikes extremely hard should go to track days, or people who are looking to push it hard.
 
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