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Discussion Starter #1
I'm about 2-3 hours from starting this job.  I've bleed brakes but have never overhauled the system.  What happens when I start removing the old sheat?  Am I going to have an environmental disaster occure around my cycle?  Any tips on how to minimize this?

TIA

I'll check back here just before I begin, after I get cleaned up after I walk the doggies.
 

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Yeah, what Skully said! Cover everything! Wheels, fender, top of bike by Master Cylinder, etc. Bleed all the fluid out of the stock lines before removing them, so they're pretty dry. Just wrap a rag around the ends after you remove the bolts so when you remove them from the bike they don't drip. I then wrapped the ends of the removed stock lines with foil so nothing ldripped. Installing the new lines isn't bad. It takes awhile to get the fluid going in the dry lines, but you'll get there eventually! Have fun!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Wasn't too bad. Put the ends of the hoses into some baggies helped minimize any risks of drips dripping on paint. Took a long time to fill the empty lines. Not sure that the banjo bleeder was really neccessary either. I bled that last and not a bubble to be seen.

The brakes seem more solid, but will have to hold off judgement till after a week of riding.
 

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After you ride a bit, take the reservoir cap off and snap the brake lever a few times.  Air bubbles sometimes get trapped between the reservoir and the brake cylinder.  It'll help them from getting soft after riding for a while.
 
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