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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone. Took the 929 to the track for the first time last weekend. It was real nice. Real nice. My only other track experience was on an R6. Big difference.

I found the 929 obviously great coming out of corners, and the turn-in to the turns was great. My only gripe was that, deep in the corners, the bike would have a tendency to dive for the inside... I'd have to really watch it to keep it on line. I think it should be a bit easier than that.

Now I could get a steering damper, which would probably help, but I don't think that's the right fix. What sort of suspension settings should I be playing with to see if I can make this better?

I understand the basics of damping/rebound/preload, but it all still seems like a bit of a mystery. I don't want to spend the money right now to have stuff rebuilt/revalved etc., because for street-riding, it's fine. I just want to get some ideas for how I can improve handling with the stock suspension for the track.

Thoughts?

--- D
 

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Good luck unless you are 130 lbs.
For under $200 cdn you can upgrade the fromt springs and fluid. Do a search.
The back should be able to dial in the sag properly.
The other adjustments are rider preference.
Spend an afternoon with a screwdirver and a note pad. Make an adjustment, write it down and go for a short ride. If the bike feels worst come back and do it again.
 

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Hi Duster929,

under what circumstances was your bike "diving to the inside" ? - by that I mean were you braking ?, accelerating, or just rolling around the corner waiting for it to open up so you could get back on the gas ?

- Spanky.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Generally, it was under compression on turn-in. I wasn't braking deep enough into corners to notice what it would do with the brakes on. On the gas, the bike would hold its line pretty well. So on exit, it wasn't a big deal. It was mostly on entry and into the first part of the turn. It was especially a problem if I went into a turn hot and tried to scrub off speed, so stayed off the gas well through the turn. Really, the times when I most wanted it to hold a line. :)

--- D
 

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I am not a track expert but I found it best to keep the throttle cracked at least a little bit throughout the turn. It did not upset the suspension as bad in the turn and seemed easier to do adjustments and tune the bike in. JM2C
 

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What kind of tires were you runing, what condition were they in, and to what pressure were they inflated? Tire profile, wear and inflation can do alot to your line.
 

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From what you've said Duster929 it sounds like you could use a little more preload upfront...if you don't have any left (ie: it's cranked right up tight already) then you could always try a half a turn of compression damping as an interrim measure while you decide if you want to shell out for heavier front springs and a revalve job...

I've put a fair bit of effort into tuning to get the most out of my 929 without spending anything on upgrading my suspension - I reckon it's worth seeing what you can achieve before spending big bucks on new stuff.

Cheers, Spanky.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Spanky, that actually sounds like a pretty good idea. I have the preload on the rear set pretty hard, but I didn't fool around with that much on the front. I bet that would make a big difference.

As for tires, they're almost-new Pilot Powers. I dropped the psi to about 30-32, and that already made a big improvement with other track-handling issues.

I know it's best to keep some throttle on through the turn, but you can't always have throttle on going into a turn. At least on tip-in, and sometimes if on the brakes going in (i.e. if passing), you just can't have throttle going, but you want to hold a solid line.

I'm going to play with the preload and see how that helps.

--- D
 

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Have you tried to set the sag? In general with the stock components, the forks are too soft, and the rear is too stiff. Depending on your weight, it may not be possible to get correct sag in the front, but turning the preload all the way in on the forks may help. You actually shouldn't have to max the preload on the rear shock. In fact, you may want to back it off a bit. Get some buddies to help you set sag. It should be about 1.25 inches front and rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
No, I haven't maxed the preload in the back. I think I set it to position 7 of 9. I've tried other positions on the rear, and this one works best for me, since I often have luggage or a passenger.

--- D
 

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Duster929 said:
No, I haven't maxed the preload in the back. I think I set it to position 7 of 9. I've tried other positions on the rear, and this one works best for me, since I often have luggage or a passenger.

--- D
ok, cool
 

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Duster929 said:
No, I haven't maxed the preload in the back. I think I set it to position 7 of 9. I've tried other positions on the rear, and this one works best for me, since I often have luggage or a passenger.

--- D
Hey Duster929, if you've cranked up the rear to position 7 but not done anything to the front suspension then your bike wont have a very balanced set-up (soft front/hard rear) and will be likely to give you the sort of handling problems you first outlined.

I've got the rear of my 929 set on position 7 too which seems to work best (for me) with the preload on the front right up tight. I ride solo 99.9% of the time, but then I weigh around 100Kgs plus riding gear.

Like HondaGalToo said, Setting the sag front and back is the best place to start - at least that will give you a base line to work from.

If you're interested, I started a thread a year or so ago in this forum that follows the saga of setting up my suspension - do a search on Spanky and have a read, I think it was called "Suspension Set-up".

Incidently, I found the front end gave me the most 'challenges' when trying to get everything set up and balanced.

Good luck,

Spanky.

P.S. I run Pilot Powers too, best road tyre I've ridden on. I run 32psi Fr and 34psi Rr.
 
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