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Discussion Starter #1
When I'm working on fixing something I'm slower than a professional mechanic. First obstacle is the technical knowledge, tools and know-how on a project.


Most time consuming is that I will do things that a pro won't do: the extras.
  1. I take my time to ensure that I don't cause extra damage
  2. I dismantle and clean other things...while I'm in there
  3. I do things off-scope
It's #2 and #3 that I want to ask about. How many of you are "guilty"? Any desire to change your habits?
 

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I'm completely OCD when it comes to number 2. That's why I sometimes procrastinate doing service work, because I know I'll end up spending twice as much time than if I just stayed focused at the task on hand.
Also things like wire brushing threads, cleaning all the surrounding parts, and other related incidental tasks suck up a lot of time.
But on the other hand, I just look at it as part of owning a clean, well running bike. I like it to look as nice as it can within reason, but I want even more for the bike to perform to it's top level. In the six+ years of owning my RC51, no shop has ever touched it.
 

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Heeza Y Zasch
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I'm not proud to admit that in my younger years, I would have been found NOT guilty of charges 1 and 2 :crap: I've hurried, I've broken bits & pieces in frustration, and even turned a blind eye to other issues NEEDING attention for the sake of getting back in the saddle and out on the road.

To be honest, those days aren't fully behind me... but having an adequate workspace, proper set of tools, Service Manual(s), some experience, and now multiple bikes enables me to work slowly, methodically, and if need be leave it to cool off, and still have something to ride.

Plus, having this site at my fingertips (utilizing the SEARCH feature) gives me the courage to tackle issues that I'd not otherwise attempt. So yeah... sometime I now go overbudget addressing things that have gone unnoticed until opened up.

:cheers: Thank you Fireblades.org

cool thread bro
 

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Turning wrenches and being "satisfied" that you've done your very best to live up to your own standards is VERY TIME CONSUMING. That's not a fault, it's something to be proud of.

I can speak from both sides of the wrench. I was in the technician field as a greenhorn back in the mid 90's. There was a senior Honda Certified Master Tech in the shop that used speed vs accuracy. He would work so fast to make or beat the ridiculous flat rate times pieces would break, nuts, bolts, screws, would be left over, and I never enjoyed watching him wrench. It showed also with his own bikes. Although mechanically sound, they were beat, and never seemed "cared for".

I was a horrible flat rate technician. I cared too much about my work, tripled checked stuff, used my torque wrench, read the manuals, and ALWAYS cleaned my dirty fingerprints off fairings, etc. I paid particular attention to the sport bikes I worked on. I even cleaned dirty rims, and the customers always commented on how great the bike looked afterwards (knowing they brought it in dirty). But, I never made a bonus, never beat the flat rate, and by the time I started to ramp up my speed I became the manager.

All that being said, take as long as you need to do even the most menial task on your own bike, the only thing you miss is time in the saddle. It's one thing I've hope to display for those here on the site, the fruits of well thought out, labor intensive love and consideration to working on your bike 👍🏻
 

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Discussion Starter #6
One of the things that I run into is over-optimistic time estimates. "This should only take a few minutes" turns into a few hours and sometimes I put it away for the next day (which doesn't come until several days later).


My time is valuable. I miss more than just saddle time. I also occupy garage space that is supposed to house our cars. When we bought this house it never dawned on me that I wouldn't have garage space to work on and/or store motorcycles. If we keep the house, I'm going to figure a way to expand the garage!
 

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Hi Jaybird,must be that I'm getting on that I'm slowing down on the work I do, start one job, and then think "Oh I'll do that while I'm at it" never really get to finish the job I went in to do, and as for the space, it's no good getting a bigger garage, if your like me there's always room for another bike, counter productive really, BUT THEN AGAIN I LOVE IT.Bill:devil
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I was thinking of getting a detached garage in place of the shed I have out back. It's big enough to keep the bikes and tractor but not big enough to maneuver and certainly not enough space to work on bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Only 3 problems with my plan
1- My taxes would go up. I currently have the largest size allowed without tax implications
2- I'd need to secure HOA approval
3- My taxes would go up.


oh and 4
4- The garage would cost more
and
5- It would take up more room in my backyard
 

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I do most of my own maintenance and really enjoy getting my hands dirty, however I do know my limitations, for instance last time I tried to "set up" the suspension on a bike, I made it worse!

Other mishaps have been setting the torque wrench to the wrong number and snapping off a stud, and the bike rolling off a paddock stand whilst bolting down the seat. Bike fell on to the stool I was using and cracked the top fairing!

However I do like an afternoon with a cup of tea, the spanners out and the radio on!

 

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Sounds like most of you summed up the wrenching problems I have too. Definitely #2 .... I have learned to take my time and use the manual over the years, but the one thing that definitely kills me is that ability to spot a semi-dirty bolt on the back side of the engine on the left side... while you were in the front on the right changing the oil =) Now that (for the last year or so) I do not have a garage (only my shed), I notice the lack of room, no climate control, no lighting (save the sun), and definitely not enough room for a work-bench as I had before - I definitely have "sped up" my jobs..

I think most people on here know I am a "bit" meticulous when it comes to Serenity. So, while I am not "as bad" as when I had a great work-space, I am definitely still mildly "OCD" when it comes to my maintenance. For what it's worth, I have only broke bolts that should have broke (very worn/old/rusty) and I do not think I have ever compromised my bike's integrity or my safety by speeding up a job (at least on Serenity..) to get back on the road.

#2 also brings up one other "minor issue".... I buy parts I either do not need or that do not "look good" in order to keep her looking fresh =) I bet over the last 3 years I have spend 1k+ on parts that were never needed =) It is an addiction really..... and I am happily addicted =)
 

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Oh quick addition - my buddy Mike rented a house with a bigger garage (2.5 car I think?) in order to store his bike and truck in there comfortably... he now has a '14 Harley Breakout, '15 Harley Fatboy, and a '14 or '15 ZX14R...... he bought a new truck that will not fit in the garage... so now he is shopping for another bike (looking at the H2) to "fill the void"......
 
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