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Just as a general enquiry, what process do you guys all follow to give your bikes that showroom shine?
Any pitfalls to cleaning a bike? Any products/polishes you all recommend?
 

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Basically I try not to use a hose or jet wash, I start with a bucket of warm soapy water (usually car wash) start at the top and work down, I use WD 40 or Brake cleaner to get rid of any stubborn grease. I then swap to a bucket of clean water and a chamois leather to dry it all off and once it’s dry some Autoglym super resin polish on the plastic and Autoglym bumper dressing on any black plastics.

Once a year I try to remove all the lower fairings and front and rear wheels just to give it a super-deep clean.



Then it pisses down half way through a ride and wonder why I bothered (this happened to me on my Triumph yesterday)
 

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Just as a general enquiry, what process do you guys all follow to give your bikes that showroom shine?
Any pitfalls to cleaning a bike? Any products/polishes you all recommend?
I tend to not “wash” the bike as a whole. I’ve learned over time living with polished frames and swing arms that good time spent with a spray detailer (spray wax/cleaner combination) works the best. Kind of as Gunk said, when I use a hose or soap bucket, I have to make sure it gets dry in every crevice. So I would overly rinse the bike and then use my backpack leaf blower to replicate the wind from a ride to get all the water off. Then a detail with the micro fiber etc.

Using the spray cleaner allows me to target areas (wheels for example), without having the entire bike soaked and soaped. It also cuts down on dry time.

I almost always go for the “detail” type of cleaning this way, but it also works great for that “quick ride” clean in case you need to impress someone at a spur of the moment destination lol
 

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I'm a firm believer in lots of small, low effort maintenance rather than a few massive blitz jobs. This means reasonably regular 'quick' washes to keep the overall grime and bugs down, plus regular component cleaning. This involves taking a thing off the bike and cleaning it and putting it back. Last week, I pulled the back wheel off and cleaned the rear swing arm. This weekend, I will pop the front brake calipers off and give them a scrub. etc. Takes an hour every weekend to keep everything shiny and allows me to keep right on top of all maintenance. I know what's looking like it will need replacing soon or is fine for a few thousand miles more. It helps if you enjoy this sort of tinkering as it's kind of a philosophy based on the journey rather than a goal...
 

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I'm a non-hose person too.

TWo buckets, one with car wash and one clean water. My bikes never see rain or wet roads so I am an exception to having to remove heavy grime. As already stated, damp cloths and surprisingly to some, Mr Sheen is a great 'interim' polish and supplement to the better proprietary waxes.
 

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Bucket man here! I don't like using any kind of high pressure hoses, let alone power washer, to clean up the bike. I give it a maintenance wash about once a week or so, or anytime after I get caught in the rain.
 
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Start by utilizing cruiser enumerating brushes to scour your bicycle's wheels, motor, and chain (if your bicycle is chain drive). Scouring free the earth and foreign substances that you've splashed can assist you with taking out cleaning the tank and bumpers twice.
Recomended: https://zanove.com/best-snow-foam
 
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