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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let me preface this post by stating the obvious: I am not mechanically inclined. Now that that is out the way, can you guys lend some advice as to how to remove water that is in the lower engine block? I took apart my carbs last summer, with the daunting task of cleaning them and replacing some o-rings. Time kind of got away from me and I never ended up finishing the project, often leaving the carbs off the engine block for extended periods of time, with the bike covered. I ended up storing the bike for the winter, with the carbs back on the engine block. Here we are a year later, and I couldn't take another day of not doing it, so I took the carbs off with the intention of starting the project up again, and I noticed some scummy looking water sitting where the carbs connect to the engine block.

First off- am I completely screwed?
If not- how can I manage to drain the water out, by myself if possible. From what I have read, some people just lift the bike completely vertically, and let the water drain out that way, but I don't have it in me to pull that off by myself.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated, I'll post of a photo for clarification. Thank you in advance!
 

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To try and get a better mental picture, the carbs connect to the cylinder head via black rubber “insulators”, commonly referred to as carb boots. From what I gather, you are saying that you noticed some residue or foreign liquid inside the intake posts of the cylinder head?

Is there a way for you to upload a photo or two of what you’re describing? It will help in offering a plan.
 

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Yup, looks like rusty water in the intake tract. Well, the remedy is going to depend on how far you want to go to make it right. You could get a syringe and put a carb/brake cleaner red nozzle tube on the end of it and suck it out, or remove the head and go through cleaning it and the valve stems and seals etc.

No way to do it properly without a major level of disassembly.

If you’re just looking to get it running and move it on the syringe will work. Spray some penetrating oil on the valves and stems as best you can afterwards.

Check and change your oil as well before turning the motor over. It could be full of water as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Alright, as long as it isn't a complete loss, I'll start with the syringe method and an oil change. Thank you for your help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was able to scoop up a manual transfer pump from Advanced Auto, I got what I would assume to be more than 95% of the water out, and then soaked up what I would see with shop towels. I cleaned the carbs today, swapped out some gnarly o-rings with some freshies and it should be ready for assembly. All she needs now is an oil change and maybe a battery charge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Update:
After cleaning the carbs, putting on new grips, performing a full oil change, and charging the battery, I think it is time to attempt to fire up the bike. As I was going through final steps yesterday of reassembly, I noticed that my choke lever won't pull up, it is stuck in the down/off position. Any ideas on what I may have done wrong, I am assuming along the assembly process....
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Update #2: I fixed the choke issue; I had the cable looped through the housing too tight, not enough slack to allow for the choke to operate. I went to fire it up, nothing. I went through, all the spark plugs look good, the main starter fuse was loose, I tightened it and at least the engine then attempted to turn over. It is cranking, just won't seem to catch and turn over all the way.

This is what has been done so far:
Cleaned carbs, replaced o-rings. I had to do this because at the end of last year it was leaking gas between from the 3rd cylinder. Doesn't seem to do that anymore.
New grips, which at first made it really tight on the starter housing unit, so tight that it didn't really allow for throttle snap-back. I loosened the bolts on the housing, it has good response now.
Oil change with new filter.
The original attempt at turning the bike over lead me to investigate the main starter fuse, which is in rough shape, but seems to have some juice still, and the fuse is good.
So to sum it all up; bike won't turn over all the way. I had it on a battery tender all night, and even connected it to a riding lawn mower, without starting the mower. Ideas?
This is what the starter fuse looks like.
 

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As a man who says he's not mechanically inclined I'd say that you're giving me a bit of confidence that MAYBE I can remove the carbs from my wife's CB750 and figure out why it's dripping fuel.

Do you have continuity at the spark plug? Pull one with the plug wire connected and see if it sparks on the top of the head. Check all 4 in this manner. Once that's done, I'd try starting fluid, tends to catch easier than gasoline (you are using fresh low ROM octane gas right?). Failing that, check for air leaks: crank the motor and spray the starting fluid around the air intake boots using the mist, not the red tube. I've also heard of people using smoke to look for air leaks.

That's it. Spark, Fuel, Air, Compression.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I wouldn't have been able to do any of this work without the help of some friends and the shop repair manual. Although this has been frustrating overall as a process, having a bike that won't run, I would be lying if I said I haven't had a bit of fun taking it apart and putting it back together. Definitely a good learning experience.

I am leaning towards this being a fuel-related issue. After attempting to start it all these different times, I would assume to smell gas or at least see/feel some in the carbs, both of which were not happening. So I need to figure out why the fuel isn't getting in there. I am nearly certain that I reassembled the tank properly, I mean it only has like 1 or 2 hoses... Also, I swapped all the spark plugs out last year, so I doubt it is in that realm.
 

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Just changing the plugs doesn’t rule out a spark issue. The plugs are part of the ignition system which is a subsystem of the electrical system.

Not smelling fuel might be a clue. Make sure the vent lines aren’t clogged. You should be able to open the petcock and get fuel to flow on the ground if the line is disconnected.

Once you have fuel flowing the float bowls should fill with fuel. Closing the choke creates sufficient vacuum to draw fuel into the floats when you turn the starter. Let in some air and move the throttle a few times to help atomize if, then try to crank it….on that thought: where did you set the needles?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I didn't mess that far into cleaning the carbs, really just opened them up to replace the o rings because of the gas leaking through.

Here is a video of me trying to start the bike, maybe it will help explain things a bit better.

 
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